There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---
Original post series Tigerluver has shared first original post series on WildFact.

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Tyrannosaurus rex

China Smilodon-Rex Offline
Regular Member
***
#16

(09-13-2018, 02:23 AM)GuateGojira Wrote:
(09-13-2018, 12:42 AM)Spalea Wrote: Very happy to read such conclusions like these ones about the T.rex ! After having read the Jack Horner's book "The complete T.rex" I remember to have been in total disagreement with his theory i.e. the T. rex was a total scavenger. I prefered the Robert T. Bakker's depictions which were revolutionary.

As for the spinosaurus, no one crocodile brought a sail-like dorsal as spinosaurus did. To imagine it swimming and diving in depth like a croc ? Very, very difficult !

Yes, T.rex was probably the most powerfull carnivore that ever existed, no animal had such a perfect design for predation, is a machine designed to kill whatever existed. The only backdown are the arms, but all the other parts of the body, brain and senses, tail, legs and specially the jaguar-like head are designed for predation. Dr Robert Bakker is one of the BEST paleontologist ever! Of course that I support his view about the T. rex!   Lol

Jack Horner, sadly, is just a bad joke now, specially with his "idea" of Triceratops=Torosaurus, that was the last nail in his coffin, it is just stupid! He was good, I don't know what happen to him. Sad

About Spinosaurus, yes, I doubth that it will be able to dive, but it can surelly swim, and with that size, that was more than enoght to catch its giant prey. Oh yes, there were fishes as large as rhinos in his habitat!!!
Guys, do you believe that "sue" is not the biggest T-rex? Jack.Hoener has some huge T-rex's specimens may larger than sue, as a matter of fact, The Tyrannosaurs rex's maximum weight could up to over 12tones, more than twice of African bush elephant.
2 users Like Smilodon-Rex's post
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#17

Sadly, Jack Horner is not a good source, he said that he had another T. rex named "Celeste" years ago (at the 90's) and that was "10% larger than Sue", but since then nothing has been published. In fact, this is the only information available of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


This is from the book "Tyrannosaurus rex: the tyrant king". So no, there is not a larger specimen from the part of Horner.

However, while for the moment there is not a T. rex "longer" than Sue - FMNH PR 2081, there is a heavier one. The specimen RSM P2523.8 know as "Scotty" was apparently heavier than Sue with more robust bones despite its similar length (c.12 m.). This is a picture of Scotty:

*This image is copyright of its original author


These are the known bones of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


The study of Campione et al. (2014) "Body mass estimation in non-avian bipeds using a theoretical conversion to quadruped stylopodial proportions" calculate a weight of  8,004 kg (6,000 - 10,007) for Scotty compare with Sue at 7,377 kg (5,531 - 9,224). Another study of Scott Harman from 2013, calculated a weight of 8,400 kg for Sue, this means that Scotty was heavier than that, probably around 9 tons.

An amateur investigator at DevianArt named "Franoys" made abother study with Sue and he calculated a body mass of 8,830 kg, check this image from him:

*This image is copyright of its original author


So if Sue weighed 8,839 kg, Scotty weighed more than 9 tons! From my point of view the maximum size of the Tyrannosaurus rex, for the moment, is 12.3 m long and a weight of c.9 tons.
5 users Like GuateGojira's post
Reply

United States tigerluver Offline
Prehistoric Feline Expert
*****
Moderators
#18

I have moved the T. rex posts here.
3 users Like tigerluver's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#19

In my own personal view of Tyrannosaurus rex - like Arctodus simus ( also my personal view ) - T-rex was a scavenger, a kleptoparasite, and a part-time predator. He was the king of his territory and could displace any more accomplished predator from its kill.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

Malaysia johnny rex Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
***
#20

We always heard female Tyrannosaurs are much larger, heavier and maybe even more dominant than the smaller males. Pete Larson and Carpenter are one of those who proposed such idea. But to be sure, I am not sure if the females are indeed bigger and more dominant than the males. It could be the males that are much bigger and dominant than the females just like most modern land apex predators.
3 users Like johnny rex's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#21

(09-26-2018, 02:43 PM)johnny rex Wrote: We always heard female Tyrannosaurs are much larger, heavier and maybe even more dominant than the smaller males. Pete Larson and Carpenter are one of those who proposed such idea. But to be sure, I am not sure if the females are indeed bigger and more dominant than the males. It could be the males that are much bigger and dominant than the females just like most modern land apex predators.

Just a thought; is there a typical size difference between sexes in birds? I really don't know much about birds. Do any of them ( the males ) battle for a mate or territory?
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

United States chaos Offline
wildlife enthusiast
***
#22

(09-26-2018, 03:17 PM)brotherbear Wrote:
(09-26-2018, 02:43 PM)johnny rex Wrote: We always heard female Tyrannosaurs are much larger, heavier and maybe even more dominant than the smaller males. Pete Larson and Carpenter are one of those who proposed such idea. But to be sure, I am not sure if the females are indeed bigger and more dominant than the males. It could be the males that are much bigger and dominant than the females just like most modern land apex predators.

Just a thought; is there a typical size difference between sexes in birds? I really don't know much about birds. Do any of them ( the males ) battle for a mate or territory?
 Apparently, scientists are able to distinguish T-Rex gender from skeletal remains, but how?
2 users Like chaos's post
Reply

India parvez Offline
Tiger Maharshi
*****
#23

@chaos I have read tigers have bone in their penis that helps during copulation. Obviously dinosaurs too must have had this kind of bone that is typical to the respective sexes.
Wisdom of third eye
1 user Likes parvez's post
Reply

Malaysia johnny rex Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
***
#24

Some bird species have males which are the larger and dominant morph @brotherbear, while others such as most birds of prey and some ratites (flightless birds) have reverse sexual size dimorphism (size differences between males and females) in which the females are larger than males and more dominant than the smaller males. 

Not really @chaos, finding gender by just looking at fossils is actually nearly impossible. So far, only one specimen of Tyrannosaurus have been assumed as female called as MOR 1125 or B-rex because there is a medullary tissue found in its femur. It is known that only female birds have this kind of tissue especially when the female bird is about to lays eggs, so this Tyrannosaurus specimen is assumed to be female if what was found in its femur is indeed 100% similar to bird medullary tissue.
3 users Like johnny rex's post
Reply

China Smilodon-Rex Offline
Regular Member
***
#25


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

《T-rex Generation》 Cartoon painted by Ted.Rechlin a famous animal cartoonist
1 user Likes Smilodon-Rex's post
Reply

China Smilodon-Rex Offline
Regular Member
***
#26

(09-26-2018, 02:14 PM)brotherbear Wrote: In my own personal view of Tyrannosaurus rex - like Arctodus simus ( also my personal view ) - T-rex was a scavenger, a kleptoparasite, and a part-time predator. He was the king of his territory and could displace any more accomplished predator from its kill.
As a matter of fact,  Tyrannosaurus-rex was a positive and awesome super massive predator, meanwhile, it also played an role of super massive scavenger. Tyrannosaurus-rex like combined the role of tiger and brown bear in ecosystem at that period.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like Smilodon-Rex's post
Reply

China Smilodon-Rex Offline
Regular Member
***
#27


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Tyrannosaurs-rex VS Triceratops
3 users Like Smilodon-Rex's post
Reply

China Smilodon-Rex Offline
Regular Member
***
#28

(09-16-2018, 01:01 PM)GuateGojira Wrote: Sadly, Jack Horner is not a good source, he said that he had another T. rex named "Celeste" years ago (at the 90's) and that was "10% larger than Sue", but since then nothing has been published. In fact, this is the only information available of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


This is from the book "Tyrannosaurus rex: the tyrant king". So no, there is not a larger specimen from the part of Horner.

However, while for the moment there is not a T. rex "longer" than Sue - FMNH PR 2081, there is a heavier one. The specimen RSM P2523.8 know as "Scotty" was apparently heavier than Sue with more robust bones despite its similar length (c.12 m.). This is a picture of Scotty:

*This image is copyright of its original author


These are the known bones of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


The study of Campione et al. (2014) "Body mass estimation in non-avian bipeds using a theoretical conversion to quadruped stylopodial proportions" calculate a weight of  8,004 kg (6,000 - 10,007) for Scotty compare with Sue at 7,377 kg (5,531 - 9,224). Another study of Scott Harman from 2013, calculated a weight of 8,400 kg for Sue, this means that Scotty was heavier than that, probably around 9 tons.

An amateur investigator at DevianArt named "Franoys" made abother study with Sue and he calculated a body mass of 8,830 kg, check this image from him:

*This image is copyright of its original author


So if Sue weighed 8,839 kg, Scotty weighed more than 9 tons! From my point of view the maximum size of the Tyrannosaurus rex, for the moment, is 12.3 m long and a weight of c.9 tons.
Guate, have you heard about the UCMP 137538?it's said it would be the biggest T-rex individual according to calculation

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

 The UCMP 137538 specimen's photo

*This image is copyright of its original author

 In fact, ucmp 137538'body-size is based on sue or stan to calculate and estimate

*This image is copyright of its original author

The size comparison between different T-rex individuals
3 users Like Smilodon-Rex's post
Reply

United States chaos Offline
wildlife enthusiast
***
#29

(09-26-2018, 07:41 PM)parvez Wrote: @chaos I have read tigers have bone in their penis that helps during copulation. Obviously dinosaurs too must have had this kind of bone that is typical to the respective sexes.

Hence the term "Boner".
1 user Likes chaos's post
Reply

United States chaos Offline
wildlife enthusiast
***
#30

(11-29-2018, 07:38 PM)Smilodon-Rex Wrote:
(09-16-2018, 01:01 PM)GuateGojira Wrote: Sadly, Jack Horner is not a good source, he said that he had another T. rex named "Celeste" years ago (at the 90's) and that was "10% larger than Sue", but since then nothing has been published. In fact, this is the only information available of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


This is from the book "Tyrannosaurus rex: the tyrant king". So no, there is not a larger specimen from the part of Horner.

However, while for the moment there is not a T. rex "longer" than Sue - FMNH PR 2081, there is a heavier one. The specimen RSM P2523.8 know as "Scotty" was apparently heavier than Sue with more robust bones despite its similar length (c.12 m.). This is a picture of Scotty:

*This image is copyright of its original author


These are the known bones of this specimen:

*This image is copyright of its original author


The study of Campione et al. (2014) "Body mass estimation in non-avian bipeds using a theoretical conversion to quadruped stylopodial proportions" calculate a weight of  8,004 kg (6,000 - 10,007) for Scotty compare with Sue at 7,377 kg (5,531 - 9,224). Another study of Scott Harman from 2013, calculated a weight of 8,400 kg for Sue, this means that Scotty was heavier than that, probably around 9 tons.

An amateur investigator at DevianArt named "Franoys" made abother study with Sue and he calculated a body mass of 8,830 kg, check this image from him:

*This image is copyright of its original author


So if Sue weighed 8,839 kg, Scotty weighed more than 9 tons! From my point of view the maximum size of the Tyrannosaurus rex, for the moment, is 12.3 m long and a weight of c.9 tons.
Guate, have you heard about the UCMP 137538?it's said it would be the biggest T-rex individual according to calculation

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

 The UCMP 137538 specimen's photo

*This image is copyright of its original author

 In fact, ucmp 137538'body-size is based on sue or stan to calculate and estimate

*This image is copyright of its original author

The size comparison between different T-rex individuals
When and where was this UCMP found? Ever since my childhood I've been fascinated by the T-Rex, as have millions of others. It amazes me as to what new discoveries will eventually be un-earthed.
Great topic!
1 user Likes chaos's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB