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Tigers with mane

India sanjay Offline
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#1

Mane are only know to have lion.
In some exception tigers have also been reported having mane. Of all tiger species, I think, Sumatran tiger have Thick,dense and long mane.
But recently I have seen an image of captive Siberian Tiger with exceptional tiger mane
See the images below
Siberian Tiger With Long Mane
*This image is copyright of its original author

Tiger with long mane
*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Pckts Offline
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#2

I have a "best manes" thread already if you'd like to post this there?
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United States Polar Offline
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#3

Lions still have the better manes in my opinion. Tiger ones are a little more to the bottom-side of the face while lion ones are just a little more up. But I like cats without manes, usually.
"Lions, tigers, bears, AND polar bears, oh my!"

- Polar, September 2017
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India sanjay Offline
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#4

(01-18-2016, 03:26 AM)Pckts Wrote: I have a "best manes" thread already if you'd like to post this there?

I thought we can discuss on tiger mane specifically
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United States Pckts Offline
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#5

Alrighty, its up to you of course. You're the mod, Ill go ahead and contribute what i have there to here as well....

Here we go:
T42 is located in Ranthambhore and is probably the most aggressive male towards tourists.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Shivaji located in Tadoba Buffer Zone

Shivaji was always loved for his consitent attitude, it seems every picture of him was him giving you the "F-off" face.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Bamera Male from Bandhavghar

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


T25 or Dollar Male from Ranth

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Machlis Grandson, T64 aka Akash

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


The Blue Eyed Male Tiger from Bandhavgarh

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Mukunda Male


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Younger Mukunda

*This image is copyright of its original author


and many more good ones here if anybody wants to post them or needs to get some IDs on some ...
http://wildfact.com/forum/topic-best-manes

@Polar
I agree, we can't compare a "tiger mane" to a lions mane, but they are both distinctive and its interesting when some tigers develop this characteristic. But I'm with you, I prefer the maneless looks cause it really shows the muscle mass in their jaws. Like with Bhima from Kahna
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United States Polar Offline
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#6
( This post was last modified: 01-19-2016, 07:39 AM by Apollo )

Quote:@Polar
I agree, we can't compare a "tiger mane" to a lions mane, but they are both distinctive and its interesting when some tigers develop this characteristic. But I'm with you, I prefer the maneless looks cause it really shows the muscle mass in their jaws. Like with Bhima from Kahna.

T-42's coat oddly looks like that of a Siberian Tiger, and usually, Siberians have a larger neck ruff than Bengals do. But in contrast, some state that Siberians are usually less aggressive than Bengals, and I don't really think that's true. Whether maned or maneless, aggression depends on the individual cat.
"Lions, tigers, bears, AND polar bears, oh my!"

- Polar, September 2017
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United States Pckts Offline
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#7

@Polar
Absolutely, and the term aggressive is relative as well.

Whats "aggressive?"

Attacks on humans?
Chasing Jeeps?
Fighting?
Bold in defense of food or territory?

There are just to many factors to say one cat is or isn't more aggressive.

Arguably the greatest fighter and defender of all is Munna, he has no mane.
But most tigers develop some mane and this also occurs more during colder months and most loose this "mane" some time in their life and grow it back. Much like a tigers "winter coat" compared to its "summer coat"
Its probably more to do with genetics and climate than anything else.
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United States Polar Offline
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#8

@Pckts:

In terms of "starting a fight" or initial aggression, it goes like this:

Lion=Tiger>Brown Bear>Polar Bear

In terms of "killing" or killer aggression when the animal had enough, it goes like this:

Polar Bear>Brown Bear>Tiger>Lion

Initial Aggression:

Chasing jeeps
Defending territory by intimidating rivals without major physical harm
Starting a fight
Chasing other rivals around just to intimidate them

Killer Aggression:

Hunger
Defending territory by trying to kill rivals under all circumstances
Ending a fight by killing the opponent
Chasing other rivals around to kill them

I'll just simply use these two terms for types of aggression from now on.
"Lions, tigers, bears, AND polar bears, oh my!"

- Polar, September 2017
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United States Pckts Offline
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#9
( This post was last modified: 01-19-2016, 05:41 AM by Pckts )

That is certainly your opinion

I don't disagree with your assessment of "initial aggression"

I do disagree on "killer aggression" 
I think the tiger is the most aggressive when coming to your definition of "killer aggression"
But that probably has to do with our biased for each animal.
Bears and Cats play by different rules and its even more complicated between sub species and terrain they inhabit.

But the biggest thing per usual is the fact that every single animal named has their own personality and what makes them snap will be completely different from individual to individual.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#10


*This image is copyright of its original author
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United States Sicilianu Offline
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#11

Somewhat unrelated, I worked with an Amur leopard who had a small mane, especially in winter. I will try to find a picture.... 

I wonder how testosterone driven manes are. As an individual, he had killed two females before landing the wonderful (and extremely aggressive) female at the zoo I worked it. She ran that relationship, but I wonder if the deaths and the mane could be testosterone driven.

Good news is that they had many wonderful cubs! Great news for the subspecies!
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United States Pckts Offline
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#12
( This post was last modified: 06-17-2016, 08:27 PM by Pckts )

(06-17-2016, 07:02 AM)Sicilianu Wrote: Somewhat unrelated, I worked with an Amur leopard who had a small mane, especially in winter. I will try to find a picture.... 

I wonder how testosterone driven manes are. As an individual, he had killed two females before landing the wonderful (and extremely aggressive) female at the zoo I worked it. She ran that relationship, but I wonder if the deaths and the mane could be testosterone driven.

Good news is that they had many wonderful cubs! Great news for the subspecies!

Welcome.

I have wondered about this myself, I look at tigers with manes and their attitude towards people. Tigers like t42, t24, Shivaji have noticeable manes and are very aggressive towards people but the flip side is tigers like bamera, t6, Tyson aren't aggressive towards people.
Then I look at particular locations, tigers in ranthambhore and Tadoba seem to have more individuals with manes than tigers in kahna or pench even though both are in central India. 
My conclusion is that it's probably more to do with genetics than testosterone and also time of year. I've read from eye witnesses that tigers will grow and shed their manes depending on the time of year. But we do know that lions have larger and darker manes when their testosterone levels are higher so maybe tigers follow the same rules. A tiger with a mane may have a larger one if their t levels are higher? A tiger not genetically predisposed to having a mans may not be affected?
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Sicilianu Offline
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#13

Indeed that is likely the gist of it. I think that primitive Panthera likely had a gene (or genes) for a small mane that would crop up when certain environmental factors favored the expression of the gene - taken to the extreme in male lions, who have a social system that facilitates increased intraspecific aggression and by extension signaling to decrease unnecessary intraspecific aggression. DNA-Genes-Environment are so linked that is can be hard parse out individual contributions to a physical state.
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United States Polar Offline
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#14

I think the mane does not really affect aggression that much, not so much testosterone either. Some people I have met along my powerlifting team took Test and actually reported themselves as being more energized but less socially aggressive. 

A particular acquaintance of mine named Robert, at 6'4" and 255-pounds, had his Test level check done at one of his bi-annual appointments. The results were shocking: he only had 6% more testosterone than an average joe, yet he lifted considerably more than I do, even on a pound-for-pound basis.

I say it depends on the individual. As with lions' mane colors and sizes, tigers with manes may have less aggression and testosterone than ones without manes, and vice versa as well.
"Lions, tigers, bears, AND polar bears, oh my!"

- Polar, September 2017
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United States paul cooper Online
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#15




Tiger with longer hair around the head
I wonder why some of them get a mane?...
There's a skeleton choking on a crust of bread..
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