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Tigers of North-Eastern India

United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-12-2017, 05:06 PM by Ngala )

Since the Sunderban tiger thread has gone so well and the images have been fantastic I figured that a thread on Kaziranga and the Tigers that live there would be cool.

While the Tigers in the Sunderbans and Kaziranga are the same Sub Species, the differences between them are as great as the differences between any other tiger sub species.

So lets take a look at the Habitat, terrain and the flora and fauna that live there.

Kaziranga National Park 


is a national park in the Golaghat and Nagaon districts of the state of Assam, India. The sanctuary, which hosts two-thirds of the world's great one-horned rhinoceroses is a World Heritage Site.[1] According to the census held in March 2015, which was jointly conducted by the Forest Department of the Government of Assam and some recognized wildlife NGOs, the rhino population in Kaziranga National Park is 2,401. It comprises 1,651 adult rhinos (663 male, 802 are females, 186 unsexed); 294 sub-adults (90 males, 114 females, 90 unsexed); 251 juveniles and 205 cubs.[2] Kaziranga is home to the highest density of tigers among protected areas in the world, and was declared a Tiger Reserve in 2006. The park is home to large breeding populations of elephants, wild water buffalo, and swamp deer.[3] Kaziranga is recognized as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International for conservation of avifaunal species. When compared with other protected areas in India, Kaziranga has achieved notable success in wildlife conservation. Located on the edge of the Eastern Himalaya biodiversity hotspot, the park combines high species diversity and visibility.

Kaziranga is a vast expanse of tall elephant grass, marshland, and dense tropical moist broadleaf forests, crisscrossed by four major rivers, including the Brahmaputra, and the park includes numerous small bodies of water. Kaziranga has been the theme of several books, songs, and documentaries. The park celebrated its centennial in 2005 after its establishment in 1905 as a reserve forest.



The Kaziranga National Park lies at the edge of eastern Himalayas, with the mighty Brahmaputra flowing in its vicinity. It lies between latitudes 26°34' N to 26°46' N and longitudes 93°08' E to 93° 36' in the 9A Indo-Burma bio-geographical region. Spread over the Golaghat and Nagaon districts of Assam, the Kaziranga National Park covers a vast area of 430 sq km. It is about 217 km away from Guwahati, which is quite accessible place from other parts of the country by road, rail and air. Other places near the Kaziranga include Jorhat (97 km) and Furkating (75 km).


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Kaziranga, Jan 2016. Kaziranga is called "Serengeti of India". For grassland landscape and the teeming wildlife. Here, in one frame--swamp deer rub against each other, a rhino feeds and a water buffalo looks up. Egrets dot the edge of the marsh. We could not turn our eyes away. Please do visit. — at Kaziranga National Park.

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Feel free to post any wildlife or habitat images here, stories or observations and most importantly, TIGERS!
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United States Pckts Offline
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Kaziranga tigers number over 125

Jan 23, 2015


The all-India tiger estimation report has put the total number of tigers in the Northeast of India at 201, a significant increase from the 148 recorded in 2010. Of the 167 tigers counted in Assam, more than 125 are believed to be in  Kaziranga National Park, where TigerTiger and parent charity DSWF have worked to protect tigers for over twenty years.
“The number of tigers is definitely increasing in Kaziranga. While a park and sanctuary-wise break-up is yet to be released, that Kaziranga’s tiger population is on the rise is evident from more sightings of cubs in the current season,” Kaziranga Park Director M K Yadava said.
Altogether 18 to 20 tiger cubs have been sighted in different pockets of the national park while one male cub had to be shifted to the state zoo in Guwahati after it was separated from its mother.
“The most positive aspect of Kaziranga is that tigers are rarely targeted by poachers here,” says Park DFO S K Seal Sarma .
In contrast, Kaziranga has lost three rhinos to poachers in the current year and 27 were killed in 2014. The three tigers known to have died in Kaziranga last year died due to natural causes.
"This is very positive news for the tigers of Kaziranga ," says DSWF CEO Sally Case. "But protecting them and the rhinos that share the park remains an ongoing, long-term commitment for  DSWF and TigerTime. Thank you to everyone whose contribution to our work has helped create this amazing news but please help us maintain tiger numbers and protect the rare one-horned rhino by continuing your support."
- See more at: http://tigertime.info/blog/219/99/Kazira...brE1n.dpuf

http://tigertime.info/blog/219/99/Kazira...r-over-125


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( This post was last modified: 02-02-2016, 04:51 AM by Pckts )

Kohora Range - The Central Heart of Kaziranga
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

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Sambhar Deer
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

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As They Say "Size Matters"!
Have a Look at This Guy!
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

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Elephants at Kohora Range (Central Zone)
Kaziranga Tiger reserve
India

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Habitat Shot of Kaziranga's Western Range
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

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Poland lightsOut Offline
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#4
( This post was last modified: 02-03-2016, 07:57 AM by lightsOut )




Indian tiger pair (Panthera tigris) at Kaziranga National Park





Tigers, Water Buffalos, Rhinos in Kaziranga Megafauna Park





The famous tiger attack video from Kaziranga in Assam, India.




Tiger captured in Kaziranga

"Fools laugh at others. Wisdom laughs at itself" -Osho.
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United States Pckts Offline
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Deer Population Rising in Kaziranga
May 15'

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A World Heritage Site, Kaziranga National Park in Assam has recorded a rise in the population of Eastern Swamp Deer. According to reports, the latest survey conducted by Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) estimated 1129 Eastern Swamp Deer in the National Park.
Locally called Dal Harina, the Eastern Swamp Deer has only one habitat left for them in the form of Kaziranga National Park. A four-day census that concluded on May 6, estimated 1129 with 328 adult males, 569 adult females, 122 yearlings and 110 fawns. M K Yadava, Director, Kaziranga National Park informed that the last year’s census estimated 854 swamp deer.
Eastern Swamp Deer is a sub-species of deer, which is on the verge of extinction in the country. This sub-species is amongst the five big mammals species found in Kaziranga National Park. The other big four mammal species are one-horned rhino, elephant, wild buffalo and tiger.







Kaziranga National Park to attract more tourists

Situated in the Golaghat and Nagaon districts of Assam, the Kaziranga National Park is now open for tourists. The park spread in an area of 430 kms hosts two-thirds of the world’s great one-horned rhinoceroses. Assam’s Forest and Environment minister Etwa Munda opened the park at Mihimukh elephant tower in the Kohora Range. Kaziranga also boasts the highest density of tigers among protected areas in the world and was declared a Tiger Reserve in 2006.
https://www.youtube.com/watch…



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Bikash Kalita
The King of Kaziranga.

People who have traveled North-East will know it better, how difficult it is to see a tiger. But was lucky to have the sight of the king and able to take a few shots,

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This is one VERY handsome Kaziranga tiger. The biggest of the Bengal's their elusive nature makes a sighting like this very special http://youtu.be/ciYf3z6ZLgs Find out how we work to protect Kaziranga's tigers here: http://tigertime.info/what-we-do/india




Kaziranga - young male - wild and free - just as it should be

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United States Pckts Offline
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Combat pour un territoire ... un tigre mort

Un tigre a été retrouvé mort près du camp de Agoratoli Dhanbari Plage, Parc national de Kaziranga. Le tigre est mort à cause d'une lutte territoriale avec un autre Tigre. Cependant, après avoir survécu pendant près de sept heures, le tigre est mort.

A Tiger has been found dead near Dhanbari camp of Agoratoli Range , Kaziranga National Park. The Tiger died due to a territorial fight with another Tiger. émoticône frown
The tiger was found near the camp with severe injuries on its right leg. After getting a tip-off, the forest officials rushed to the spot and rescued the tiger. The doctors of the Wild Life Rescue Centre (WRC) provided primary treatment. However, after surviving for almost seven hours, the tiger died.


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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-11-2016, 10:31 PM by Pckts )

Credit to Apollo on the find...

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it reminded me of this one...





Can there truly be a larger cat than these guys, by the looks of them, I don't think so.


Kaziranga Tigress released back in to the wild
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=926_1424207482
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United States Pckts Offline
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This bullock at Dumjan, a village at the fringe of the Kaziranga National Park, survives a battle with a tiger last night when the mighty cat stealthily attacked the cattle shed behind few huts. Out of six cattle ruminating in the shed, overlooking the edge of the park and lined with flowering Azar trees, the tiger pounced upon the healthiest one. Breaking the bamboo fence, tiger pulled the bullock, lifting through the neck muscles while the bovine struggled and faught back. The muddy vegetable field where dung slurry made the surface more slippery, the bullock was able to get out of the powerful jaw's clutches. The owners by this time were awake and began shouting.
The Corbett Foundation was called to provide veterinary care around midnight to this bleeding bullock in shock. There is extensive damage to the underlying musculature but vital parts like trachea, oesophagus and jugular veins were safe and intact.
Providing timely veterinary care to the livestock injured by wildlife should form an integral part of mitigating the conflict.
Thanks Manoj Gogoi for immediately visiting the injured animal and getting instant veterinary help along with Dr Naveen Pandey.
It would take around three weeks for the wound to heal under veterinary care.


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Kaziranga wins top tiger density status

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1160213/js...sIZTlI7DeF

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A tiger in Kaziranga National Park. Picture courtesy: KNP/WWF/Aaranyak
Guwahati, Feb. 12: Kaziranga National Park has the highest density and the third highest population of tigers in the country, a recently released report of a study undertaken in 2014 has revealed.
The tiger density in Kaziranga is 12.72 per 100 square km, followed by the Jim Corbett National Park (11) in Uttarakhand and Bandipur National Park (10.28) in Karnataka, says a detailed report, Status of Tigers, Co-predators and Prey in India, brought out by the Wildlife Institute of India and the National Tiger Conservation Authority.
The park, which was declared a tiger reserve in 2007, has an area of 860 square km.
This is the first time that a central report has said that Kaziranga has the highest density of tigers. In 2010, a wildlife NGO of Assam, Aaranyak, had said the reserve has the highest density of tigers. The NGO had covered only the central and western areas of the park. The national tiger estimation of 2010, which was carried out by the NTCA and WII, had said Corbett had the highest density of tigers in the country.
As for tiger estimation, Kaziranga has 103 big cats, preceded only by Corbett (215) and Bandipur (120), says the report. The range of tiger population in Kaziranga is between 91 and 115, it adds.
The report gives the big cat population of all tiger reserves in the country. In an earlier report, Status of Tigers in India 2014, released last year, the figures, based on the 2014 study, were given on landscape basis.
Kaziranga field director M.K. Yadava told The Telegraph, "It is certainly good news. The authorities take it with pride that the reserve has the highest density of tigers."
He said studies undertaken by the park authorities had revealed that the carrying capacity of tigers is 141 (plus-minus 5). Carrying capacity is how many animals can be supported in a certain environment on the resources present.
Kaziranga authorities have submitted a draft tiger conservation plan to the Centre, which has asked for some more details before it can clear it, Yadava said. The plan lists 10 disasters like earthquakes, bio hazards, erosion and consequences of building dams on the Brahmaputra, which may strike Kaziranga and threaten its conservation value.
Yadava said the park authorities had carried out a camera trap exercise on their own last year. "We are expecting 120 tigers. The final results should be out soon," he added.
Kaziranga gets flooded every year by the Brahmaputra and the Karbi hills on its south act as an important refuge. The report says, "It is crucial to manage traffic on the highway passing through Kaziranga by modern technology so that infrastructure and urban sprawl do not form a barrier for this important movement of wildlife into Karbi Anglong".
Jimmy Borah, senior coordinator of the Tiger Conservation Programme of WWF-India, said the tiger, being a conservation-dependent species, acts as a symbol of excellent health of bio-diversity. "With a good protection regime for rhinos and the presence of a high prey base, tigers in Kaziranga have benefited in both ways. It is now up to all of us to ensure that these tigers have enough space and connecting corridors to disperse and breed in suitable habitats," Borah said.
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Brazil strana Offline
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(02-16-2016, 12:01 AM)Pckts Wrote: Kaziranga wins top tiger density status

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1160213/js...sIZTlI7DeF

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A tiger in Kaziranga National Park. Picture courtesy: KNP/WWF/Aaranyak
Guwahati, Feb. 12: Kaziranga National Park has the highest density and the third highest population of tigers in the country, a recently released report of a study undertaken in 2014 has revealed.
The tiger density in Kaziranga is 12.72 per 100 square km, followed by the Jim Corbett National Park (11) in Uttarakhand and Bandipur National Park (10.28) in Karnataka, says a detailed report, Status of Tigers, Co-predators and Prey in India, brought out by the Wildlife Institute of India and the National Tiger Conservation Authority.
The park, which was declared a tiger reserve in 2007, has an area of 860 square km.
This is the first time that a central report has said that Kaziranga has the highest density of tigers. In 2010, a wildlife NGO of Assam, Aaranyak, had said the reserve has the highest density of tigers. The NGO had covered only the central and western areas of the park. The national tiger estimation of 2010, which was carried out by the NTCA and WII, had said Corbett had the highest density of tigers in the country.
As for tiger estimation, Kaziranga has 103 big cats, preceded only by Corbett (215) and Bandipur (120), says the report. The range of tiger population in Kaziranga is between 91 and 115, it adds.
The report gives the big cat population of all tiger reserves in the country. In an earlier report, Status of Tigers in India 2014, released last year, the figures, based on the 2014 study, were given on landscape basis.
Kaziranga field director M.K. Yadava told The Telegraph, "It is certainly good news. The authorities take it with pride that the reserve has the highest density of tigers."
He said studies undertaken by the park authorities had revealed that the carrying capacity of tigers is 141 (plus-minus 5). Carrying capacity is how many animals can be supported in a certain environment on the resources present.
Kaziranga authorities have submitted a draft tiger conservation plan to the Centre, which has asked for some more details before it can clear it, Yadava said. The plan lists 10 disasters like earthquakes, bio hazards, erosion and consequences of building dams on the Brahmaputra, which may strike Kaziranga and threaten its conservation value.
Yadava said the park authorities had carried out a camera trap exercise on their own last year. "We are expecting 120 tigers. The final results should be out soon," he added.
Kaziranga gets flooded every year by the Brahmaputra and the Karbi hills on its south act as an important refuge. The report says, "It is crucial to manage traffic on the highway passing through Kaziranga by modern technology so that infrastructure and urban sprawl do not form a barrier for this important movement of wildlife into Karbi Anglong".
Jimmy Borah, senior coordinator of the Tiger Conservation Programme of WWF-India, said the tiger, being a conservation-dependent species, acts as a symbol of excellent health of bio-diversity. "With a good protection regime for rhinos and the presence of a high prey base, tigers in Kaziranga have benefited in both ways. It is now up to all of us to ensure that these tigers have enough space and connecting corridors to disperse and breed in suitable habitats," Borah said.

Hi Pckts,
 
I have read this news in "Telegraph" about Kaziranga  yesterday . Last year it was reported in the same Telegraph India that Kaziranga had 163, but certainly they have considered also Nameri and Pakke. However, Orang Park (  very near Kaziranga too, I do not understand why it is not upgraded to Tiger Reserve status, despite being small  area ) looks to have the top tiger density.
 It would be fascinating to have more information about the complex Bandipur/Nagarhole/Mudumalai/BRT/Wayanad: with such good prey base and numerous tigers, there are certainly many big cats over there. I can not believe that these South India tigers are not as huge as the Central India tigers .
By the way, do you know where can I find the complete tiger account and density by each reserve ?? In Wildlife India Institute and NCTA official sites  I could find only the same "2014 ALL INDIA TIGERS ESTIMATION RESULT ", where there are not details about each reserve individually, with some exceptions, like Sariska, Panna, Dampa, Valmicki, when the number of tigers found is reported. Generally the say only the results of regions , like Rajaji +Corbett +Dudhwa + Pilibit , or Kanha + Pench +Achaknar, Kazi + Nameri + Pakke.
It would be good to get  precise information.
Thanks.
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Poland lightsOut Offline
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Veteran

"Fools laugh at others. Wisdom laughs at itself" -Osho.
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United States Pckts Offline
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That tight tiger actually got shot in face, It's sad.
Tfs though
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United States Pckts Offline
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@strana

"Hi Pckts,
 
I have read this news in "Telegraph" about Kaziranga  yesterday . Last year it was reported in the same Telegraph India that Kaziranga had 163, but certainly they have considered also Nameri and Pakke. However, Orang Park (  very near Kaziranga too, I do not understand why it is not upgraded to Tiger Reserve status, despite being small  area ) looks to have the top tiger density.
 It would be fascinating to have more information about the complex Bandipur/Nagarhole/Mudumalai/BRT/Wayanad: with such good prey base and numerous tigers, there are certainly many big cats over there. I can not believe that these South India tigers are not as huge as the Central India tigers .
By the way, do you know where can I find the complete tiger account and density by each reserve ?? In Wildlife India Institute and NCTA official sites  I could find only the same "2014 ALL INDIA TIGERS ESTIMATION RESULT ", where there are not details about each reserve individually, with some exceptions, like Sariska, Panna, Dampa, Valmicki, when the number of tigers found is reported. Generally the say only the results of regions , like Rajaji +Corbett +Dudhwa + Pilibit , or Kanha + Pench +Achaknar, Kazi + Nameri + Pakke.
It would be good to get  precise information.
Thanks. "

Unfortunately I don't know where you would be able to find individual reserves tiger population #'s, may be an email to F. D. of each reserve could serve useful, but I'm sure it will depend on who you're able to get in touch with.
The tiger numbers used by IUCN are a bit old but fairly accurate, here is a link
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/136899/0

I agree that Orang Park should definitely be upgraded to a Tiger Reserve but I assume that is more of a political issue than any thing else. Hopefully it will also be added to the protected reserve list.
In regards to S. Indian Tigers being as large as Central India, I see no reason why some couldn't be just as large. I know for a fact that Raja was said to be a very large cat, as large as many others from C. India, and considering C. Indian has a range of Tiger size from Gabbar all the way up to Waghdoh as well as Kahna Males which IMO are among the largest in C. India, overall. So I'm sure there are quite a few tigers walking around S. India that could rival C. Indian Tiger size, I have seen some large ones from the past in hunting records as well, I just don't think overall that they are as large as C. Indian Tigers.
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United States Pckts Offline
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The Tigers of Assam



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As part of the All India Tiger Monitoring (AITM) programme the teams that TigerTime and our loyal supporters fund in Assam have been busy counting tigers. Counting and measuring pugmarks (tiger pawprints) is now a thing of the past and instead the teams set up camera traps around the national parks. Placed on either side of a path or between trees the cameras are triggered when an animal breaks the infrared beams and is photographed from both sides. This is important as tigers have different stripe patterns on either flank so to build up a true picture of tiger numbers and to identify individuals two pictures work best. The traps also record prey species and occasionally poachers. 
These pictures show some amazing images of the beautiful tigers that live in Kaziranga, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the banks of the Bramaputra River and which, through your donations we are helping to protect.
The team are currently inputting the data and we'll have more information on tiger numbers soon. For now, simply enjoy!
You can find out more about our work in Kaziranga which includes monitoring, anti-poaching, wildlife crime investigation and community outreach by clicking here. 
Please help us continue our important work to protect the tigers of Assam by making a donation here. Thank you.
- See more at: http://tigertime.info/blog/170/99/Tigers...ud8Ci.dpuf


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United States stoja9 Offline
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#15

Those tigers seem faded. Really light stripes and almost tan instead of orange. Is that common for that region?
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