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Tiger Predation

Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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(04-03-2018, 06:10 PM)Rishi Wrote: Hunt goes wrong, wild boars kill tiger!
Apr 3, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author


BHOPAL: An adult tiger has been killed in a fight with a wild boar in Balaghat district, taking the toll of big cat deaths to nine in four months. 

The 6-year-old tiger’s carcass was spotted in Balaghat’s Logur range — on the Kanha-Pench corridor — late Saturday night and it was recovered on Sunday. Initially, forest officials suspected the tiger was electrocuted or poisoned, but no such evidence was found during autopsy. “Fight with wild boars seems to be only reason as we have found boar hair and faecal samples on the spot,” said an officer. DFO Deva Prasad told TOI that the matter is still under investigation. “Wild boars could be the reason,” said the officer.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild boars are very aggressive and fiercely defend themselves.
Weighing upto over 150kg, they use their formidable skull as a battering ram and come armed with sharp tusks.

Balaghat is one of the non-protected areas in Kanha-Pench corridor where density of both tiger and prey is comparatively high.
This region is also one of the World Wildlife Fund — India TX2 sites, which aims at doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2020.


I'm quite curious about how they jumped from electrocution or poison to fight with a boar as cause of death... I mean, wounds caused by a boar ought to be distinctive, or do indian boars have pokemon-like attacks?
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-03-2018, 12:12 PM by Rishi )

(04-30-2018, 06:41 PM)Shir Babr Wrote:
(04-03-2018, 06:10 PM)Rishi Wrote: Hunt goes wrong, wild boars kill tiger!
Apr 3, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author


BHOPAL: An adult tiger has been killed in a fight with a wild boar in Balaghat district, taking the toll of big cat deaths to nine in four months. 

The 6-year-old tiger’s carcass was spotted in Balaghat’s Logur range — on the Kanha-Pench corridor — late Saturday night and it was recovered on Sunday. Initially, forest officials suspected the tiger was electrocuted or poisoned, but no such evidence was found during autopsy. “Fight with wild boars seems to be only reason as we have found boar hair and faecal samples on the spot,” said an officer. DFO Deva Prasad told TOI that the matter is still under investigation. “Wild boars could be the reason,” said the officer.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild boars are very aggressive and fiercely defend themselves.
Weighing upto over 150kg, they use their formidable skull as a battering ram and come armed with sharp tusks.

Balaghat is one of the non-protected areas in Kanha-Pench corridor where density of both tiger and prey is comparatively high.
This region is also one of the World Wildlife Fund — India TX2 sites, which aims at doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2020.


I'm quite curious about how they jumped from electrocution or poison to fight with a boar as cause of death... I mean, wounds caused by a boar ought to be distinctive, or do indian boars have pokemon-like attacks?

The usual reasons of tiger deaths in fringe-forests areas are electrocution & poisoning, like infighting is in core habitats.
If all body parts are there, then they initially assume either of the two to speed up the process & start looking for signs. 

Electrocution don't always leave marks, just a centimetres long burn!

Like in this separate case:

*This image is copyright of its original author

The boar pushed her to electrified fence during the wrestle. He could have done it intentionally... Those fences are put-up to deter boars & they probably know what it does.
(Wasn't aware of the conduction property of electricity though.)
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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-08-2018, 05:39 AM by Shir Babr )

(05-03-2018, 06:42 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(04-30-2018, 06:41 PM)Shir Babr Wrote:
(04-03-2018, 06:10 PM)Rishi Wrote: Hunt goes wrong, wild boars kill tiger!
Apr 3, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author


BHOPAL: An adult tiger has been killed in a fight with a wild boar in Balaghat district, taking the toll of big cat deaths to nine in four months. 

The 6-year-old tiger’s carcass was spotted in Balaghat’s Logur range — on the Kanha-Pench corridor — late Saturday night and it was recovered on Sunday. Initially, forest officials suspected the tiger was electrocuted or poisoned, but no such evidence was found during autopsy. “Fight with wild boars seems to be only reason as we have found boar hair and faecal samples on the spot,” said an officer. DFO Deva Prasad told TOI that the matter is still under investigation. “Wild boars could be the reason,” said the officer.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild boars are very aggressive and fiercely defend themselves.
Weighing upto over 150kg, they use their formidable skull as a battering ram and come armed with sharp tusks.

Balaghat is one of the non-protected areas in Kanha-Pench corridor where density of both tiger and prey is comparatively high.
This region is also one of the World Wildlife Fund — India TX2 sites, which aims at doubling the number of tigers in the wild by 2020.


I'm quite curious about how they jumped from electrocution or poison to fight with a boar as cause of death... I mean, wounds caused by a boar ought to be distinctive, or do indian boars have pokemon-like attacks?

The usual reasons of tiger deaths in fringe-forests areas are electrocution & poisoning, like infighting is in core habitats.
If all body parts are there, then they initially assume either of the two to speed up the process & start looking for signs. 

Electrocution don't always leave marks, just a centimetres long burn!

Like in this separate case:

*This image is copyright of its original author

The boar pushed her to electrified fence during the wrestle. He could have done it intentionally... Those fences are put-up to deter boars & they probably know what it does.
(Wasn't aware of conduction property of electricity though.)


I see. I was guessing for electrocution to be the cause the tiger had to be found in the immediacy of a fence, and boars attacks leave slash wounds, that's why I found it confusing.
But why the hell is the current in those fences so strong that is capable of killing a tiger if its only supposed to deter boars??
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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author


What seems to be a subadult attacking a gaur.
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United States paul cooper Offline
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(05-08-2018, 05:33 AM)Shir Babr Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author


What seems to be a subadult attacking a gaur.

The gaur looks relaxed.. i think the subadult is just getting a piggy back ride?
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-08-2018, 12:10 PM by Rishi )

(05-03-2018, 11:48 AM)Shir Babr Wrote: I see. I was guessing for electrocution to be the cause the tiger had to be found in the immediacy of a fence, and boars attacks leave slash wounds, that's why I found it confusing.
But why the hell is the current in those fences so strong that is capable of killing a tiger if its only supposed to deter boars??
Because they steal the electricity directly from nearby power lines (220V-440V) by a method called "hooking". 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Also, electrocution induced trauma or internal haemorrhage doesn't always kill immediately.

(05-08-2018, 07:35 AM)paul cooper Wrote:
(05-08-2018, 05:33 AM)Shir Babr Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author


What seems to be a subadult attacking a gaur.

The gaur looks relaxed.. i think the subadult is just getting a piggy back ride?

No, its mouth is foaming & it's in shock!

The mother had probably hamstringed it before letting the cubs take over.
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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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(05-08-2018, 07:51 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(05-03-2018, 11:48 AM)Shir Babr Wrote: I see. I was guessing for electrocution to be the cause the tiger had to be found in the immediacy of a fence, and boars attacks leave slash wounds, that's why I found it confusing.
But why the hell is the current in those fences so strong that is capable of killing a tiger if its only supposed to deter boars??
Because they steal the electricity directly from nearby power lines (220V-440V) by a method called "hooking". 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Also, electrocution induced trauma or internal haemorrhage  doesn't always kill immediately.

I'm sorry for being ignorant, I didn't even knew that the fences were illegal in the first place. Thanks for replying.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Tigress feeding on spotted deer in Pench




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Such smart & brave tigress Sonam stealing food from Crocodile for her cubs.





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Tiger pair chased by elephants.




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United States Pckts Offline
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Kunwar Shantanu Singh‎ 

Having breakfast in the morning.
It was the great starting of his day.
When He successfully killed a "Sambhar Deer" in 1 attempt
#Legend_Fateh will always be
unconquered




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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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(05-22-2018, 09:47 PM)Pckts Wrote: Kunwar Shantanu Singh‎ 

Having breakfast in the morning.
It was the great starting of his day.
When He successfully killed a "Sambhar Deer" in 1 attempt
#Legend_Fateh will always be
unconquered





Great to see Fateh looking great he seems huge, that Sambar looks fairly adult aswel!
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United States Pckts Offline
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(05-22-2018, 11:48 PM)Pantherinae Wrote:
(05-22-2018, 09:47 PM)Pckts Wrote: Kunwar Shantanu Singh‎ 

Having breakfast in the morning.
It was the great starting of his day.
When He successfully killed a "Sambhar Deer" in 1 attempt
#Legend_Fateh will always be
unconquered





Great to see Fateh looking great he seems huge, that Sambar looks fairly adult aswel!

I was thinking it was a youngster or a small female because sambar  are pretty big, but maybe Fateh is a huge male as well.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Fateh feeding on domestic cow




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Chotti mada family and gaur interaction in Kanha




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