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The most powerful predator teeth of all time?

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-27-2015, 01:24 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

Livyatan Melville: The largest recorded individual tooth measures up to 14 inches (35 cm), while the rumor suggests some even larger tooth up to 16 inches (40 cm).

I don't have the weight of the largest tooth, but consider that a 7.5 inches (19 cm) modern sperm whale tooth can weigh up to 700 grams (1.5 pounds), it is likely that the largest Leviathan tooth can weigh over 10 pounds.

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/18783/lot/66/

Here is a monster tooth of the Leviathan.


*This image is copyright of its original author





Tyrannosaurus Rex: The longest recorded tooth measures up to 13.75 inches, although the weight is unknown for that tooth. But a 5 inches fragment already weighs up to 337.8 grams, so an entire tooth can weigh over 900 grams (2 pounds).

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/dinosaurs/8952217/Tyrannosaurus-Rex-tooth-sells-for-world-record.html

Here is the replica of the largest recorded T. rex tooth.


*This image is copyright of its original author




Megalodon: There are many pics of the exaggerated fake Meg teeth being found online, but when it comes to the real teeth, a 169 mm tooth based on the slant height weighs up to 538 grams, and I guess the largest one should weigh over 600 grams.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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India brotherbear Offline
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http://www.geologypage.com/2016/04/fossi...iller.html 
  
   
*This image is copyright of its original author
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-24-2016, 09:44 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

(04-24-2016, 06:03 PM)brotherbear Wrote: http://www.geologypage.com/2016/04/fossi...iller.html 
  
   
*This image is copyright of its original author

This isn't from Leviathan, but from a regular Sperm whale.

These guys were truly the overlords among the known predators in the history, just check the comparison with the T-Rex tooth.



*This image is copyright of its original author
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India brotherbear Offline
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GrizzlyClaws - I read somewhere some years ago that whalers of the 1800s used to collect sperm whale jaws as souvenirs. Some of those bulls measured over 80 feet long. Any truth that you know of? 
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-25-2016, 12:04 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(04-24-2016, 10:05 PM)brotherbear Wrote: GrizzlyClaws - I read somewhere some years ago that whalers of the 1800s used to collect sperm whale jaws as souvenirs. Some of those bulls measured over 80 feet long. Any truth that you know of? 

Yeah, I heard it since the AVA era, and it is from the Whaling Museum in Massachusetts, US.

The specimen was estimated to be 80 feet long and weighed over 120 tons. And I am wondering how many new species of the giant Sperm whales that we could discover in the future.
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chaos Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-23-2016, 10:26 PM by sanjay Edit Reason: corrected the link )

Check out this "whale " of a tooth
https://www.yahoo.com/news/fossilised-to...24002.html
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India brotherbear Offline
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The site doesn't work for me, but I found these: http://www.epictimes.com/04/22/2016/giant-killer-whale/  and  http://magazines.scholastic.com/news/201...ying-Tooth
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chaos Offline
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Thanks for the assist Bro Bear. This would put ancient Orcas in the same arena as Megaladon. Quite an intriguing find.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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12 inches, wow!
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callmejoe9 Offline
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The Livyatan was certainly a fantastic find. We've known about macroraptorial sperm whales for over a century now, but most of them were pretty orca-sized. I'd imagine it was quite a shock to recover the 3-meter skull from the Pisco Formation. The holotype skull is estimated to have belonged to a 13.5-meter individual when using the skull-body proportions of modern sperm whales, and 16.2-17.5 meters when a closer relative, the Zygophyseter. At the largest, this specimen likely surpassed 50 tons.

https://static-content.springer.com/esm/...M6_ESM.pdf

I ran into a paleoartist who makes a strong argument that the 16.2-meter estimate was the most reliable. Instead of using the total skull length, he focused on the occipital-atlas ratio, which was conserved between sperm whales. The substitutes he used was both the modern sperm whales and the Brygmophyseter, which was more complete than the Zygophyseter. After using the portion of the occipital bone from the holotype to get the estimated size of the occipital protrusion, he scaled the protrusions on the Brygmophyseter and modern sperm whale skeletons to the same size. This method amazing led to the size differences between the scaled substitutes to basically go away, as the overall skeletons from the neck-down were very conserved. Making some adjustments, the paleoartists could not make much room for the holotype specimen to have been too much smaller or shorter than 16.2m.


https://www.deviantart.com/harry-the-fox...-744756670


I'm only mentioning him because he uses a reasonable methodology for his argument and it was highly congruent with the official estimates anyway.

The holotype bone was originally dated at 12-13 million years old but has been updated to about 8.9-9.9 million. 
https://www.researchgate.net/publication...ne_of_Peru

Large teeth have been found in other parts of the world in the past 3 years such as Chile, Argentina, South Africa, and Australia. This suggests these creatures dominated the Southern hemisphere and went extinct in the early Pliocene. The Australian and South African estimates are the youngest at 4-5 million years old. It's a fair assumption these belonged to either the Livyatan or its close relatives because:

A. No other macroraptorial sperm whale teeth comes close to its size.

B. Other morphological characters are highly congruent.

However, given the difference in age and that teeth alone aren't very diagnostic at the species-level, it's also likely these were different species, but very close relatives.
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flatiousa Offline
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A few hardy researchers have conducted tests on real live animals. The most powerful bite recorded from a living animal belongs to the saltwater crocodile, according to a 2012 study by Gregory Erickson of Florida State University in Tallahassee and colleagues.  Co więcej, onesie nie krępują ruchów, są elastyczne i bardzo komfortowe. Czy można chcieć czegoś więcej? Już teraz wybierz dla siebie jedno z naszych kigurumi!
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