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The Mighty Mapogos

China fursan syed Offline
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Mlowathis Mr.T and Kinky Tail 


Taken on 2009-08-14 at 06:39:13 just as the sun had risen.
Credits to Mitchelle Krog 


*This image is copyright of its original author

One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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China fursan syed Offline
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Ohhh ohhhh ohhhhhh ..... here comes trouble

For one, I cannot part with a single photo containing Mr T, no matter if he was out of focus in this photo or not it still tells a story.

The cubs and their reactions to him getting angry for me are priceless. Even after this Mr T remained super calm with his cubs despite them continuing to annoy him constantly.

It goes to show that a fearless Warrior like T had a soft side too.

Credits to Mitchelle Krog 

*This image is copyright of its original author










One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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United States taetertot Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-03-2018, 01:46 PM by taetertot )

Hi, new here, with a question. I've been really interested in Sabi Sands ever since my nieces went there and brought back stories. I just now finally tracked down the documentary "Brothers in Blood: Lions of Sabi Sands" and watched it. Here is the thing though: the doc names the Mapogo as Mahkulu, Pretty Boy, Mr T, Kinky Tail, Rasta, and Skewed Spine/Scar Spined Male. Dreadlock is given as an alternate name for Rasta. And then at the end, they state that Pretty Boy and Rasta disappeared shortly Kinky Tail's death, with some assuming the Majin got them. And then Mr T dies and the doc ends, they never mention what happens to Mak and the lion they named as Scar at the beginning.

But the consensus usage everywhere, like here, youtube, facebook, seems to be Dreadlock in place of Scar, with Rasta as a different lion. And the standard chronology says Dreadlock disappeared, and then Rasta was killed in the showdown with the Majin on June 10, 2010.

And yet I look at the people who speak on that documentary and I can't believe they got that wrong. They include people like Karin van der Merwe, Nkorho Lodge manager, who shot the footage of Kinky Tail's death; and one of the guy who witnessed Mr T's dying moments. Just go to imdb and look at who's on that doc: Sabi Sands field guides, lodge managers, field rangers, game wardens, etc. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4689268/

So what's going on here with the naming discrepancy? It would make sense if Dreadlock and Rasta are alternate names, it's variations on a theme in a world where naming conventions are often descriptive, like Mr T and his Mohawk. I'm sorry if it's been addressed before, I'm browsing multiple threads right now and haven't read every post in this thread yet.
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China fursan syed Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-03-2018, 02:02 PM by fursan syed )

(02-03-2018, 01:24 PM)taetertot Wrote: Hi, new here, with a question. I've been really interested in Sabi Sands ever since my nieces went there and brought back stories. I just now finally tracked down the documentary "Brothers in Blood: Lions of Sabi Sands" and watched it. Here is the thing though: the doc names the Mapogo as Mahkulu, Pretty Boy, Mr T, Kinky Tail, Rasta, and Scar. Dreadlock is given as an alternate name for Rasta.

But the consensus usage everywhere, like here, youtube, facebook, seems to be Dreadlock in place of Scar, with Rasta as a different lion.

And yet I look at the people who speak on that documentary and I can't believe they got that wrong. They include people like Karin van der Merwe, Nkorho Lodge manager, who shot the footage of Kinky Tail's death; and one of the guy who witnessed Mr T's dying moments. Just go to imdb and look at who's on that doc: Sabi Sands field guides, lodge managers, field rangers, game wardens, etc. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4689268/

So what's going on here with the naming discrepancy? It would make sense if Dreadlock and Rasta are alternate names, it's variations on a theme in a world where naming conventions are often descriptive, like Mr T and his Mohawk. I'm sorry if it's been addressed before, I'm browsing multiple threads right now and haven't read every post in this thread yet.

Hello @taetertot 

they did some mistakes in names, but its most likely the mistakes of the narrator not the mistakes of the field guides and rangers.
the problem is during the early days of mapogo era Rasta was called Dreadlocks, sabi sand is divided in to many different smaller reserves so different reserves different names.

(The Scar in the documentary was originally pretty boy, the Pretty Boy in the documentary is dreadlocks, and the dreadlocks in the documentary is Rasta)  

These are the different names of six mapogos 
 
Eyrefield Males aka Sparta Males aka Mapogo Males aka Mapoho Males aka Mapocho Males aka Cannibals

1. Makhulu or Makulu aka Ngalalalekha 
2. Pretty Boy aka T2 aka Bent Spine aka Scorro
3. Rasta aka Red aka Leonidas aka (Dreadlocks in early years)
4. Dreadlocks aka Scar aka Snip Tail 

Two Younger Mapogo Males also called Mlowathi Males in Mala Mala from Late 2008 to mid 2010

5. Kinky Tail aka Shaka
6. Mr.T aka Mohawk aka SaTan aka Short Mane aka Broken Nose
One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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United States Fredymrt Offline
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(02-03-2018, 01:59 PM)fursan syed Wrote: Two Younger Mapogo Males also called Mlowathi Males in Mala Mala from Late 2008 to mid 2010

The mlowathi males were first named on Mala Mala after their takeover from the old Rollercoaster male. That name was given to Mr.t &  Kt by Mala Mala late in year (Sep 2009 ) and it was not unique to just them as other males were named that in the past.
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South Africa HouseOfLions Offline
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(03-07-2018, 08:39 AM)Fredymrt Wrote:
(02-03-2018, 01:59 PM)fursan syed Wrote: Two Younger Mapogo Males also called Mlowathi Males in Mala Mala from Late 2008 to mid 2010

The mlowathi males were first named on Mala Mala after their takeover from the old Rollercoaster male. That name was given to Mr.t &  Kt by Mala Mala late in year (Sep 2009 ) and it was not unique to just them as other males were named that in the past.

He didn't say it was unique to them but that they were also called that. That is why he listed all the names they were called during their lifetime.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to Lesley Stahl - Londolozi.

The Trojan Lioness:

There’s a new book out called The Age of Empathy by Frans de Waal about how chimpanzees console each other, prefer to share and nurse the injured. The notion that primates are compassionate and generous leads to the conclusion that humans are hardwired for empathy. I buy it!


That’s the thing about observing animals: you inevitably learn as much about us as you do about them. Take our trip this summer to an animal reserve.

We were horrified. A gang of six male lions had invaded our favorite corner of Africa and were committing gruesome crimes. They took over prides, one after the other, by killing the males, slaughtering all the cubs (yes, the babies) and then raping the grieving mothers. How depraved! How law of the jungle! How like an animal! How not like a man whom Shakespeare compared to an angel!

But wait a minute. Hold on. What about the Trojan women? Odysseus and the Greeks captured Troy, killed all the men and enslaved (raped) all the women. The Greeks didn’t have to kill the Trojan children – whom they enslaved – because human females are what scientists call “receptive,” even with kids in tow. Lionesses are only “receptive” once they have no more cubs to care for.

Bosnia. Ancient Carthage. Somalia. Kill the men, possess the women. Cry havoc!

So this is the tale of the Trojan lionesses.

Lionesses have bad table manners, which demonstrates they’re not sharers, but can also lead to tragic consequences, as we were about to learn.

We had just bundled into an open-air Land Rover, wrapped in layers of blankets and vests and scarves and newly acquired gloves. And a hot water bottle! The sun wasn’t up yet and it was winter in South Africa. The radio squawked.

“Some lionesses have killed a giraffe,” said Tom, our guide and driver, his South African accent sounding so civil in contrast to his news. “We’ll try to take a look.”

Then the trees and the rutted road and the clear-blue dry-season sky began toroar. Nature’s own surround sound. Roar answered roar. A lion food fight was underway, the roars getting louder, meaner, more frightening. We clutched our hot water bottles.


We were rushing and bouncing and banging into a lion version of Richard III, a tale replete with visions of dynasty, the apparent murder of princes, and a tall-stack breakfast of giraffe meat.

We were staying at Londolozi, one of the great lodges in Africa, located on the edge of Kruger National Park in South Africa. Tom had known for years the lionesses who killed the giraffe, knew when they were born, when they had their first dates, that these moms had followed the unfortunate giraffe into the territory ruled by the gang of six lions, dominated by Satan, so dubbed by the guides because he not only killed other lions – but ate them. Satan is a cannibal. Which we were told is as rare in the world of lions as it is in the world of men.

When the lionesses took down the giraffe, they should have remembered their manners. But they didn’t. There were seven lionesses and their cubs. They couldn’t all eat the prime parts of the giraffe at the same time. So they fought, and growled. That deep, thrilling, terrorizing growl that carries for miles and miles. Two of the male lions heard it and knew what it meant.

“The males came in from the north,” our radio crackled.

Perhaps the lionesses stood and fought because they had numbers: Seven females against two males gave them confidence. A thunderstorm of roars. It seemed to move the earth, as Hemingway said. Then the sound changed. Running. Confusion. What was happening?

“The lionesses are running away,” Tom said.

We caught up with the lionesses a few minutes later at a small watering hole. Being cats, they were washing their paws and their faces, getting the blood off. They huddled together, shoulder to shoulder, like a family caught in a storm. We counted seven lionesses and three cubs.


“There are supposed to be six cubs,” Tom said. “Where are the missing cubs? Hiding or dead or dying in the grass?”

The missing cubs, probably murdered, were the princes in the Tower who were slaughtered by Richard III to clear his way to the English throne. Richard was usurping a kingdom, Satan – a pride, both using the same merciless tools.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Having washed and drunk their fill, the defeated army of lionesses began a long, single-file retreat, constantly looking back over their shoulders, putting as much space between themselves and the killers as they could. Their wounds were still bleeding: cheeks, noses, rib cages, flanks.

The crippled pride crossed paths with a small herd of giraffes. One lioness gave chase, but the others were in no mood for another giraffe hunt. They were not going to make the same mistake again before the blood from the first had even dried. The hunter, finding her hunt unsupported, soon gave up and returned to the others.

Here’s where you see yourself in the animal kingdom: in the posture of defeat – shoulders hunched; the eyes of failure – sad and ashamed; the gait of ignominious retreat – slow and plodding. We were inching along in our Land Rover beside this pathetic family, right next to them, and my heart was aching for the mothers of the missing cubs.

So, we people … we gain empathy from the jungle, but we also gain blood lust and an urge to conquer. It’s all in our genes.

As for the defeated army of Trojan Lionesses, we would learn that their cubs were hiding! The mothers would go back for them, and the wars would go on. One of “our” lionesses was later killed fighting the males for the body of a hippo. Meanwhile our own casualty reports keep mounting.

We continue to evolve but do we advance?
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to JMK.

Kinky tail, 2010.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to Ulusaba.

Death in the mist: 17th March 2012 by Virgin.


As we set out on the morning safari, a heavy mist hung in the air around the base of Rock lodge.  We were anxious to head south to find out what had happened with the Mapogos during the night knowing that the Southern male coalition had moved to within a kilometer of their position. 


There were reports of lions calling to the south so we went in search of fresh tracks.  We stopped to listen, south of Skwenga dam and heard roars and growling coming from just beyond our vision in the mist.  As we turned the corner, we saw four lions running down the road away from us.  We quickly realised that it was three of the Southern males pursuing one of the Mapogos!  They crossed the drainage line feeding Skwenga dam and a within a hundred meters  the males had caught up with the Mapogo. 

We saw that it was the male with the deep cut on his right nostril.  What happened next was absolutely incredible, the Mogogo turned to face his aggressors.  The three younger males slowly circled him and then the attack began as one launched on his flank, sinking his teeth into his spine just above the tail.  The other two attacked his head while another aimed bites at his belly. 

After intense seconds of fury, the attack broke off as the three regrouped.  As they rested, the three Southern males planned their next attack as the Mapogo stood holding his ground.  The attacks grew more and more aggressive as the males targeted the spine of the Mapogo. 

We witnessed three such attacks in just 15 minutes.  The fighting took place over most of the morning and after a while, the fourth male joined in adding his strength.  This proved too much for the Mapogo and after several attacks, the lions succeeded in severing his spine.  Without the use of his legs and suffering from a bad head injury, the Mapogo was left to succumb to his wounds as the Southern males walked off.  Why did he have to face them alone?  Where are the other two Mapogo?  We later learnt that they had beat a hasty retreat to the east as their brother was left to flee before the might of the four younger and stronger males.

The story is not over but we all believe the end has been written for the Mapogos, they will soon have to face these four males if they want to keep their territory along with their cubs. 

After watching this male grow over the past few years, I trust his courage and strength are reflected in these photos and that his spirit will be remembered by all who have had the privilege of seeing him while on safari at Ulusaba.

Regards,

Phillip Andrew and the Ranger and Tracker team
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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China fursan syed Offline
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RIP Mr.T 
The Legend is gone




One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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Homage to SaTan Mapogo




One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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China fursan syed Offline
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Mr.T Mapogo History's Most Brutal Lion 




One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to Ann Guinane Shane.

August 2011, the 3 remaining Mapogos Makhulu, Pretty Boy and Mr T calling, while resting, around the vehicle - one on the left, one on the right, and one behind - it shook the whole truck... turn up the volume!

Click on it to play.



‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Credits to Ann Guinane Shane.

Mr.T with his girl.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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China fursan syed Offline
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Never Before Seen Images of Kinky Tail Mapogo 

Dated: July 2007, at Ulusaba Game Reserve
Credits Goes to Ann Guinane Shane



*This image is copyright of its original author



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One day's life of a lion is preferable to hundred years of a jackal "Tipu Sultan"
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