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Smilodon fatalis

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#16

(12-30-2017, 06:07 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Epaiva, what would you say would be the approximate typical shoulder height, head and body length, and weight of Smilodon fatalis?

Shoulder height of 1 mt  head and shoulder length of 1,80 mt and weight from 250 to more than 300 kgs, if you see their skeleton they were more massive than Tigers and Lions.
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United States brotherbear Offline
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#17

(12-31-2017, 12:13 AM)epaiva Wrote:
(12-30-2017, 06:07 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Epaiva, what would you say would be the approximate typical shoulder height, head and body length, and weight of Smilodon fatalis?

Shoulder height of 1 mt  head and shoulder length of 1,80 mt and weight from 250 to more than 300 kgs, if you see their skeleton they were more massive than Tigers and Lions.

Shoulder height - 1 m ( 3 feet 3 inches ).
Body Length - 1.8 m ( 5 feet 11 inches ). 
Weight - from 250 to 300 kg ( 551 pounds to 661 pounds ).
Roughly the size of a lion but considerably heavier.
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#18
( This post was last modified: 04-18-2018, 02:40 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @bbs_wild

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#19
( This post was last modified: 05-14-2018, 03:42 AM by epaiva )

Credits to @katennemeow and @3angie3

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*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States tigerluver Offline
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First record of Smilodon fatalis Leidy, 1868 (Felidae, Machairodontinae) in the extra-Andean region of South America (late Pleistocene, Sopas Formation), Uruguay: Taxonomic and paleobiogeographic implicationsAbstract

The Felidae are known in South America from the Ensenadan Stage/Age onwards. Among them, machairodonts of the genus Smilodon stand out. Three species are recognized, and all three are present on the continent: S. gracilis from the early-middle Pleistocene in north-east Venezuela; S. fatalis, found only in Lujanian sediments on the west side of the Andes (north-west of Peru and south-west of Ecuador); and S. populator, which inhabited the eastern part of the Andes during the Ensenadan and Lujanian. This distribution has led to the suggestion that the last two felids were allopatric during the Lujanian. Here, we report the first evidence of S. fatalis in the eastern part of the continent (Sopas Formation, late Pleistocene of Uruguay), based on an almost complete skull. This finding not only enlarges its distribution in South America but questions the idea of allopatric distribution. It also adds a new component to the mammalian predator trophic level of Uruguay, with the capacity to predate large South American herbivores and megaherbivores. A revision of materials previously assigned to S. populator in the extra-Andean zone of South America will be required.

Here is the skull and its measurements:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Every year, it seems the Pleistocene was more and more crowded. Now South America even had two Smilodons, even though they are still considered to be geographically separated from each other (allopatric). PM for the paper.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(06-26-2018, 07:25 AM)tigerluver Wrote: First record of Smilodon fatalis Leidy, 1868 (Felidae, Machairodontinae) in the extra-Andean region of South America (late Pleistocene, Sopas Formation), Uruguay: Taxonomic and paleobiogeographic implicationsAbstract

The Felidae are known in South America from the Ensenadan Stage/Age onwards. Among them, machairodonts of the genus Smilodon stand out. Three species are recognized, and all three are present on the continent: S. gracilis from the early-middle Pleistocene in north-east Venezuela; S. fatalis, found only in Lujanian sediments on the west side of the Andes (north-west of Peru and south-west of Ecuador); and S. populator, which inhabited the eastern part of the Andes during the Ensenadan and Lujanian. This distribution has led to the suggestion that the last two felids were allopatric during the Lujanian. Here, we report the first evidence of S. fatalis in the eastern part of the continent (Sopas Formation, late Pleistocene of Uruguay), based on an almost complete skull. This finding not only enlarges its distribution in South America but questions the idea of allopatric distribution. It also adds a new component to the mammalian predator trophic level of Uruguay, with the capacity to predate large South American herbivores and megaherbivores. A revision of materials previously assigned to S. populator in the extra-Andean zone of South America will be required.

Here is the skull and its measurements:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Every year, it seems the Pleistocene was more and more crowded. Now South America even had two Smilodons, even though they are still considered to be geographically separated from each other (allopatric). PM for the paper.
@tigerluver
Thanks a lot for your valuable information
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#22
( This post was last modified: 07-21-2018, 09:06 PM by epaiva )

Book Smilodon the iconic Sabertooth by Lars Werdelin and H. G. McDonald

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India Rishi Offline
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#23

Remarkably well made Smilodon fatalis vinyl kit from dansdinosaurs.com
Sculpted by Sean Cooper.


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"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Canada Wolverine Offline
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Really a peace of art, I would ordered it but price is a bit salty....
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-13-2018, 08:41 PM by epaiva )

Credit to @nhmla

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-19-2018, 09:08 AM by epaiva )

Reconstructed life appearance of Smilodon family
Book Sabertooth
Mauricio Anton

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United States brotherbear Offline
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There was this ages-old theory about how Smilodon killed with his long saber-like teeth. The story goes that he stabbed his prey with his mouth shut. Considering his massive neck and shoulder muscles ( rivaling those of a grizzly ), and considering that this method works for the only saber-toothed animal living today ( walrus )... perhaps?
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
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United States brotherbear Offline
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On a documentary that I recently watched, it was said that Smilodon adults has very little sexual morphism. Both male and female being the same size and with the same-sized teeth.  Would this suggest that Smilodon males did not fight for mates nor for territory? If so, the lifestyle of a pride of saber-toothed cats must have been very different from that of lions.
 > The Great Bear - Grizzly - Ursus Arctos - Brown Bear <  
  
             
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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(09-04-2018, 03:03 AM)brotherbear Wrote: On a documentary that I recently watched, it was said that Smilodon adults has very little sexual morphism. Both male and female being the same size and with the same-sized teeth.  Would this suggest that Smilodon males did not fight for mates nor for territory? If so, the lifestyle of a pride of saber-toothed cats must have been very different from that of lions.

Hello ! Good to see you back !

I read something like that too...

https://today.duke.edu/2009/11/sabertooth.html

With all the possible consequences.
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Canada Wolverine Offline
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S. fatalis by Roman Uchytel
https://www.newdinosaurs.com/roman-uchytel/


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