There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 1 Vote(s) - 2 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Smilodon fatalis

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#1
( This post was last modified: 10-03-2017, 10:10 PM by epaiva )

Smilodon fatalis was the famous cat known from the Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles.The tar, a bit like asphalt, has yielded about a million bones of late Pleistocene mammals, of which 162,000 bones are from Smilodon, representing perhaps 1200 individuals. it weighted up to 280 kg (620 lb) measured from 175 to 190 cm and had a height at the shoulders of 100 cm (39 in). The coat pattern of Smilodon is unknown, but it has been artistically restored with plain or spotted patterns.
Smilodon fatalis hunted large herbivores such as bison and camels, but it is unclear in what manner the bite itself was delivered.
The front limbs on these cats were longer and stronger than modern cats, and from that, and its teeth, its method of attack must have been different. An educated guess would be: they were an ambush predators, which clung on round the neck of their prey, and slashed at the underside of the throat. This contrasts with the method of the modern lion, which brings down its prey by weight of numbers, and clamps its jaws over the prey's nose and mouth. The prey dies of suffocation.
Smilodon's gape could have reached almost 120 degrees, while that of the modern lion reaches 65 degrees. This makes the gape wide enough to allow Smilodon to slash the throats of their victims without closing their jaws in a bite.


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
8 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

India Rishi Online
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#2

(05-03-2017, 10:34 PM)epaiva Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

How is their fur-colour estimated..??
"Everything not saved will be lost."

4 users Like Rishi's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#3

Compare Smilodon with a tiger:

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
4 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#4
( This post was last modified: 05-08-2017, 02:59 AM by epaiva )

(05-07-2017, 08:25 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Compare Smilodon with a tiger:

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

@brotherbear

Incredible how powerful Smilodon fatalis were compared to Tigers and Lions
3 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#5
( This post was last modified: 07-21-2017, 08:11 AM by epaiva )

Smilodon fatalis skeleton


*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#6
( This post was last modified: 08-09-2017, 09:48 PM by epaiva )


*This image is copyright of its original author


Sequential reconstruction of the head of Smilodon fatalis. The position of the main muscles of mastication, the temporalis and masseter (top right) is clearly indicated by features of the skull (top left) and their mass goes a long way to define the volumes of the animal`s living head. The cartilaginous nose is placed so that its anterior tip, or rhinarium, is slightly anterior to the incisor arch (bottom left). External attributes like fur length and coloring are based on analogies with extant relatives, phylogenetic reasoning, and functional considerations (bottom right). Taken from the Book Sabertooth (Mauricio Anton)
@Rishi
6 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#7
( This post was last modified: 08-23-2017, 07:59 PM by epaiva )

Smilodon fatalis upper fang


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#8
( This post was last modified: 09-29-2017, 06:46 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @thelabreatarpits


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
6 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

United States Cisneros Offline
New Join
#9

Incredible creature and awesome pics. I love this period, especially the cats like Smilodon fatalis.
4 users Like Cisneros's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#10
( This post was last modified: 09-30-2017, 08:40 AM by epaiva )


*This image is copyright of its original author


Skeleton comparison of Smilodon top and conical toothed Panthera. Note that the sabertooth has longer neck, shorter back and tail, and more robust limb bone.
Book Sabertooth - Mauricio Anton
3 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
*****
#11

@epaiva :

About #10: compared with the #3, the back doesn't get inclined downward frankly, it is simply more curved. If the #3 is true, the smilodon moved like an extant spotted hyena (less quickly but perhaps having more stamina). If the #10 turns out to be true, the smilodon moved like an extant felid (short and fast speed). Thus, the conclusions are very different as concerns the animal biology and the way of life.
3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#12
( This post was last modified: 11-01-2017, 05:48 PM by epaiva )

Smilodon fatalis defending its kill, a Bison calf, from a trio of Dire wolves. (drawing Mark Hallett) taken from the book THE OTHER SABER-TOOTHS


*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#13
( This post was last modified: 11-01-2017, 05:50 PM by epaiva )

Taken from the book THE OTHER SABER-TOOTHS


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#14
( This post was last modified: 12-16-2017, 10:16 PM by epaiva )

Credit to @shotgunpunk


*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#15

Epaiva, what would you say would be the approximate typical shoulder height, head and body length, and weight of Smilodon fatalis?
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
2 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB