There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Question for Peter

United States Siegfried Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
***
#46

Unless you put one of these on your animal, this is a silly debate.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
2 users Like Siegfried's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#47
( This post was last modified: 04-16-2015, 10:16 PM by Pckts )

(04-16-2015, 03:28 PM)'Siegfried' Wrote: Unless you put one of these on your animal, this is a silly debate.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 

 

Even then it would need to be outfitted to compare lb for lb pulling....
It's just like combine testing for Humans
Strength is measured in many athletic tests and the same goes for living things.

 
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#48

I'm not too surprised at the comments following my post concerning comparing the strength of a tiger with that of a grizzly at equal size. You take take a healthy mature male of each of these two species at equal bipedal height ( a fair contest ) as can be seen on post #225 at: On The Edge of Extinction - A - Tigers ( pictured - taxidermy ), I would say that the bear has a considerable strength advantage. I have never denied the advantages of the tiger: He is a faster runner and quicker in a fight. He has a considerable advantage in agility and leaping ability. With bigger full-carnivore teeth and a stronger bite force, the tiger has a deadlier bite. Both the claws of the tiger and the grizzly can do devastating damage to flesh, but the tiger has a distinct advantage in that he can grip his prey or adversary much better than a grizzly.
If the tiger were equally as strong as the grizzly, as some suggest, then the grizzly should be on top of the tiger's prey choices, rather than last. The tiger should be routinely hunting mature male grizzlies, as such a bear could feed a tiger for a week. The remaks I'm reading are like those of politicians dancing around an unpopular topic.  
2 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#49
( This post was last modified: 04-17-2015, 09:13 PM by Pckts )

(04-17-2015, 06:09 PM)'brotherbear' Wrote: I'm not too surprised at the comments following my post concerning comparing the strength of a tiger with that of a grizzly at equal size. You take take a healthy mature male of each of these two species at equal bipedal height ( a fair contest ) as can be seen on post #225 at: On The Edge of Extinction - A - Tigers ( pictured - taxidermy ), I would say that the bear has a considerable strength advantage. I have never denied the advantages of the tiger: He is a faster runner and quicker in a fight. He has a considerable advantage in agility and leaping ability. With bigger full-carnivore teeth and a stronger bite force, the tiger has a deadlier bite. Both the claws of the tiger and the grizzly can do devastating damage to flesh, but the tiger has a distinct advantage in that he can grip his prey or adversary much better than a grizzly.
If the tiger were equally as strong as the grizzly, as some suggest, then the grizzly should be on top of the tiger's prey choices, rather than last. The tiger should be routinely hunting mature male grizzlies, as such a bear could feed a tiger for a week. The remaks I'm reading are like those of politicians dancing around an unpopular topic.  


 



Why would a animal that is "equally as strong" and has considerable weapons be "at the top" of a predators list?
Why wouldn't a animal that is weaker, possesses less of a threat and is easier to kill be at the top of a predators list?
Tigers prey on bears smaller and larger than themselves, bears kill tigers, that is all there is to it on that point. 

Nobody is "dancing around the topic"
Lb for lb (the most common way strength is measured), you have no clue who is stronger. Its been stated the same over and over again. 
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
#50

Nice dance.  [img]images/smilies/dodgy.gif[/img]
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#51

(04-17-2015, 09:48 PM)'brotherbear' Wrote: Nice dance.  [img]images/smilies/dodgy.gif[/img]

 

Its called the "common sense dance", my partner is "facts" and the music is provided by "evidence."

 
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB