There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Prehistoric Crocodiles

United States brobear Offline
New Member
*
#61

https://www.kronosrising.com/the-creatur...s9TfzPw1EQ 
   
It appears that History’s mightiest terrestrial predator was not without fear, but what was eating it?  
 

*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like brobear's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
*****
#62

@brobear :

About #61and the linked account: very interesting theory which I'm agreee with. It's sure that even a T-rex would have an enemy, no one wild creature hasn't ennemy to fear. And the parrallel with the extant lions and tigers is good. A superpredator on land is never "invulnerable". At any one time, inevitably, he could be in a delicate situation, and of course, having need to drink at last one time a day...

An other interesting point I notice is the lenght of the whiskers according to the social or solitary way of life of the lions and tigers
3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

United States brobear Offline
New Member
*
#63

Quote: Before we get into the science aspect, let’s examine how T-rex most likely drank. I believe the Cassowary is the best example we have to compare it to today. I’ve studied footage of ostriches drinking and their technique is similar, except that there is excessive head raising in order to get the water to flow down that long neck.  (If anything, an ostrich would be a good comparison for a sauropod in terms of drinking – write that down). Let’s look at this video of a Cassowary imbibing.  This is probably similar to what a large theropod did: remaining upright, possibly wading into the water a bit, lowered its head down, then lifted it back to the horizontal to ingest. Note that the bird remains alert the entire time. 
 
Of course, while doing this a Tyrannosaur, or any animal small enough to fall on the menu, was a potential target for a big, hungry crocodylomorph. And let’s not kid ourselves and say, “Oh, no crocodile, even Deinosuchus, could take down a T-rex.” Pushing 40 feet, the “dread crocodile” was as large as the largest of Tyrannosaurs, with jaws that were potentially even more powerful. And, let’s not forget, crocodiles often travel in loose “gangs”. Once a prey item is pulled off balance and into the water, it’s a feeding frenzy that no Tyrannosaurus could survive.  
  
*Brobear: I would wager on the T-rex having the stronger bite; not that it would save him.  
2 users Like brobear's post
Reply

Malaysia johnny rex Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
***
#64
( This post was last modified: 06-22-2019, 09:35 PM by johnny rex )

Tyrannosaurus rex lived much later than Deinosuchus. The tyrannosaurids that lived alongside Deinosuchus are the much smaller Albertosaurus. While it is possible for Deinosuchus to kill a Tyrannosaurus rex, a Tyrannosaurus rex can also kill any Deinosuchus especially on land. Deinosuchus and Tyrannosaurus Rex are around the same size. Bite force measurements are subjective as different studies will show different results, but I will assume both animals have comparable bite strength.
4 users Like johnny rex's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Regular Member
***
#65
( This post was last modified: 06-23-2019, 06:25 PM by BorneanTiger )

(02-18-2019, 05:50 PM)Spalea Wrote: @brobear :

About #61and the linked account: very interesting theory which I'm agreee with. It's sure that even a T-rex would have an enemy, no one wild creature hasn't ennemy to fear. And the parrallel with the extant lions and tigers is good. A superpredator on land is never "invulnerable". At any one time, inevitably, he could be in a delicate situation, and of course, having need to drink at last one time a day...

An other interesting point I notice is the lenght of the whiskers according to the social or solitary way of life of the lions and tigers

If we were to use what happens with modern crocodilians and terrestrial predators such as the lion, tiger and jaguar, barring their aquatic rivals such as hippos and otters, then it would be a case of if the terrestrial predator is in the water, or gets too close to the water, then it is at risk of becoming a prey for the croc, but if the croc gets too close to land, or is being hunted by a terrestrial predator that is fond of swimming, then the croc is in trouble: 

15-foot Bengali crocodile (possibly a saltwater crocodile, or a rather large mugger crocodile: https://archive.org/details/journalofbom...b/page/296) kills a Bengal tiger that swam across a river in the Sundarbans, South Asia, 2011, otherwise, crocs are noted to have been preyed upon by tigers: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne...tiger.html

Crocodile killing an African lioness that was crossing a river: 




Fang the South-East African lion scaring off crocodiles that his pride couldn't scare off in Masai Mara, Kenya: 




Southern African lions eating a crocodile in Zimbabwe: 




Machli the Bengal tigress killing a 14-foot mugger crocodile at Ranthambore National Park, northwest India: 




Jaguars vs crocodilians: 



3 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United States Styx38 Offline
Member
**
#66

Video that briefly explains the relationship between Deinosuchus and Albertosaurus.





2 users Like Styx38's post
Reply

Malaysia johnny rex Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
***
#67

(06-24-2019, 11:56 AM)Styx38 Wrote: Video that briefly explains the relationship between Deinosuchus and Albertosaurus.






The Deinosuchus in Prehistoric Park documentary are grossly oversized by judging from the skull that Nigel carried.
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#68

(06-23-2019, 12:02 AM)BorneanTiger Wrote:
(02-18-2019, 05:50 PM)Spalea Wrote: @brobear :

About #61and the linked account: very interesting theory which I'm agreee with. It's sure that even a T-rex would have an enemy, no one wild creature hasn't ennemy to fear. And the parrallel with the extant lions and tigers is good. A superpredator on land is never "invulnerable". At any one time, inevitably, he could be in a delicate situation, and of course, having need to drink at last one time a day...

An other interesting point I notice is the lenght of the whiskers according to the social or solitary way of life of the lions and tigers

If we were to use what happens with modern crocodilians and terrestrial predators such as the lion, tiger and jaguar, barring their aquatic rivals such as hippos and otters, then it would be a case of if the terrestrial predator is in the water, or gets too close to the water, then it is at risk of becoming a prey for the croc, but if the croc gets too close to land, or is being hunted by a terrestrial predator that is fond of swimming, then the croc is in trouble: 

15-foot Bengali crocodile (possibly a saltwater crocodile, or a rather large mugger crocodile: https://archive.org/details/journalofbom...b/page/296) kills a Bengal tiger that swam across a river in the Sundarbans, South Asia, 2011, otherwise, crocs are noted to have been preyed upon by tigers: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne...tiger.html

Crocodile killing an African lioness that was crossing a river: 




Fang the South-East African lion scaring off crocodiles that his pride couldn't scare off in Masai Mara, Kenya: 




Southern African lions eating a crocodile in Zimbabwe: 




Machli the Bengal tigress killing a 14-foot mugger crocodile at Ranthambore National Park, northwest India: 




Jaguars vs crocodilians: 




That first video, where was said, that crocodile kills lioness. That was one of those fabricated videos. That first attack was mix from many different videos. Looks like there in first scene some antelope got killed even though first was shown a swimming lion from some other video. Other cases were one male lion which got attacked and survived. Then there were two lions, who got out of water. Other videos were better, but that first one was one of those fabricated to make things look dramatic.
2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#69
( This post was last modified: 06-26-2019, 03:30 PM by Shadow )

(06-25-2019, 04:45 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(06-23-2019, 12:02 AM)BorneanTiger Wrote:
(02-18-2019, 05:50 PM)Spalea Wrote: @brobear :

About #61and the linked account: very interesting theory which I'm agreee with. It's sure that even a T-rex would have an enemy, no one wild creature hasn't ennemy to fear. And the parrallel with the extant lions and tigers is good. A superpredator on land is never "invulnerable". At any one time, inevitably, he could be in a delicate situation, and of course, having need to drink at last one time a day...

An other interesting point I notice is the lenght of the whiskers according to the social or solitary way of life of the lions and tigers

If we were to use what happens with modern crocodilians and terrestrial predators such as the lion, tiger and jaguar, barring their aquatic rivals such as hippos and otters, then it would be a case of if the terrestrial predator is in the water, or gets too close to the water, then it is at risk of becoming a prey for the croc, but if the croc gets too close to land, or is being hunted by a terrestrial predator that is fond of swimming, then the croc is in trouble: 

15-foot Bengali crocodile (possibly a saltwater crocodile, or a rather large mugger crocodile: https://archive.org/details/journalofbom...b/page/296) kills a Bengal tiger that swam across a river in the Sundarbans, South Asia, 2011, otherwise, crocs are noted to have been preyed upon by tigers: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne...tiger.html

Crocodile killing an African lioness that was crossing a river: 




Fang the South-East African lion scaring off crocodiles that his pride couldn't scare off in Masai Mara, Kenya: 




Southern African lions eating a crocodile in Zimbabwe: 




Machli the Bengal tigress killing a 14-foot mugger crocodile at Ranthambore National Park, northwest India: 




Jaguars vs crocodilians: 




That first video, where was said, that crocodile kills lioness. That was one of those fabricated videos. That first attack was mix from many different videos. Looks like there in first scene some antelope got killed even though first was shown a swimming lion from some other video. Other cases were one male lion which got attacked and survived. Then there were two lions, who got out of water. Other videos were better, but that first one was one of those fabricated to make things look dramatic.

I actually looked a bit closer that lioness scene. It looks like, that there is first filmed when some lion goes to swim, then naturally some other case, where crocodile goes to swim. Then again some closeups underwater etc. as can be seen to add dramatics. And of course when there is actual fight, everything is so blurred, that there could be happening anything, no possibility to know which animals there are actually... probably other one is at least some sort of crocodile, caiman or hippo :) Then, when it is over... after all those closeups, the best what people making that documentary can offer is some footage, where killed animal again could be anything. Also the crocodile seems to have transformed itself into a caiman :)

It is no secret, that in documentaries we see often fabricated scenes, but usually at least species are as those should be... In closeup, where there is some feline, I think, that it could be a puma maybe. Ears don´t look like a lion for me. Maybe @epaiva you could give opinion, when you compare 0:37-0:38 to what can be seen 1:02-1:09. Quite obvious, don´t you think? Then again 1:20-1:21 I think, that it is a puma, which then again isn´t connected to earlier scenes in any other way than that it is too in water for some reason.

I point out this video just because this is one good example about fabricated videos, and this was originally presented by Nat Geo wild. Same time there is a lot of footage, where lions and crocodiles are really fighting on land and in rivers. And this is what Nat Geo wild offers to viewers.





This is Nat Geo version with dramatic narration.




2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#70

Sarcosuchus imperator in University of Chicago with Paul Sereno 
Credit to Dinosaur 101

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#71

Sarcosuchus imperator skull in the Museum of Scotland 
Credit to Tom McPherson

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#72

Purussaurus mirandai skull en Museo de Ciencias de Caracas, Venezuela 

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like epaiva's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB