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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - C - THE JAGUAR (Panthera onca)

United States Pckts Offline
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#31

He looks skinny, very sad to see. Hopefully the translocate some more to Arizona and help that population grow. Come on US, make me proud.
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#32

(08-21-2015, 06:33 AM)Majingilane Wrote: Guate do you have any idea of how much jaguars weight in Argentina? From what I know, that is quite little since they are so elusive, their home range reachs to at least the north of Argentina, maybe Misiones that is directly connected to Brasil.
And great tables and images, that jaguar of almost 150 kg is a huge, muscular beast. Amazing animal.

From 55 kg the smallest female to 130 kg the largest male , mentioned with no details in Redyaguarate.org.ar , the skull measurements of animals shot in Argentina are comparable to the ones from the Bolivian Chaco or Brazilian Pantanal so 100kg male and 65 kg females average is reasonable but concrete data is lacking.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#33

In fact, the data is about the jaguar in general, not specifically of those in Argentina.

Original in Spanish: "Desde 55 hasta 130 kilos, según la subespecie (la Palustris es en general la más grande) y el sexo (los machos son más grandes que las hembras)."

Translated to English: From 55 up to 130 kilos, according with the subspecies (Palustris is generally the bigger one) and sex (males are larger than females).

Link: http://www.redyaguarete.org.ar/datos-per...uales.html

I guess you have saw data on the skulls of this specimens (I don't), so I believe in your assumption. Besides, pictures of specimens in the north of Argentina (which is close to the Pantanal), it shows animals of great size.
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#34

(12-29-2015, 11:55 PM)GuateGojira Wrote: In fact, the data is about the jaguar in general, not specifically of those in Argentina.

Original in Spanish: "Desde 55 hasta 130 kilos, según la subespecie (la Palustris es en general la más grande) y el sexo (los machos son más grandes que las hembras)."

Translated to English: From 55 up to 130 kilos, according with the subspecies (Palustris is generally the bigger one) and sex (males are larger than females).

Link: http://www.redyaguarete.org.ar/datos-per...uales.html

I guess you have saw data on the skulls of this specimens (I don't), so I believe in your assumption. Besides, pictures of specimens in the north of Argentina (which is close to the Pantanal), it shows animals of great size.

I see the (segun la subespecie) part now so yes this is for all jaguars not just the region.
I have extensive hunting records of trophy animals worldwide including carnivores, however the way a trophy skull is measured is different from taking morphological reading by biologists, but say if the size of skulls of  jaguars shot in the Pantanal  are similar to those shot in Misiones then we can assume they are comparable.
Unfortunately jaguars have fewer books , studies, and data about them than Pumas, cheetahs, and leopards and far less than tigers or lions.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#35

http://www.latimes.com/visuals/video/la-...video.html
Rare footage of jaguar in the Santa Rita Mountains outside Tucson



This is rare footage of the only jaguar known to be living in the wild in the United States. The footage was shot in the fall in the Santa Rita Mountains about 30 miles outside Tucson. The Center for Biological Diversity in Tucson has been working for years to save jaguars in the U.S.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#36

The Whereabouts of Jaguars
by Rich Laburn on December 1, 2011 7
Last month we brought you a story about the Caiman Ecological Refuge situated in the Southern Pantanal, South America.  This ecotourism destination, much like Londolozi, is home to many spotted cats and where we have abundant Leopard, they have the Jaguar.  The Caiman Ecological Refuge is currently undertaking the Restoration of certain areas of the Pantanal in order to create a balance between wildlife and cattle ranching and the team there have embarked on a jaguar habituation programme with a vision to soon be able to offer jaguar viewing to guests at Caiman, similar to which has been achieved with Leopards at Londolozi.  The below post is an interesting report from the environmental manager, Helder Brando, detailing how they are collaring Jaguars to be able to monitor their movements and gain a better understanding of their behaviour.  Not only does this information aid in better understanding the cat, but it also allows for the Jaguars to be tracked, found and thus habituated with greater ease.

‘At two o’clock in the morning the Onçafari Project team was preparing itself for the first jaguar capture. We were running through the forest edge towards the expected location and when we went out of the car we could see a beautiful female in the trap. As expected, she was calm and we did all the preparations for the sedative. The photo below shows the dart already fired. She was so quiet with our presence that she didn’t even respond to the dart firing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Female Jaguar
At the horizon a powerful storm was approaching and as we were working, the sounds of thunders and the cold wind built the scenery. It was an unique experience to work with the Americas’ largest wildcat surrounded by the sounds of the Pantanal rain. It was a beautiful female weighting 85 kg and about 5 years old. The whole process of setting the GPS collar was done quickly and in less than two hours she was recovering herself already.
Her coat was wonderful without any apparent marks, a healthy young adult. The storm was gone weak and was now a gentle rain. She recovered quickly on the wet grass and her name couldn’t be more appropriate: CHUVA, meaning “Rain” in portuguese.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Female Jaguar
Two days later, another pleasant surprise awaited us. It was about eight o’clock in the morning. We knew that four jaguars were using that area, when a soft sunlight showed a beautiful jaguar resting on the track. Even though it was attached to the trap, the jaguar was sleeping when we arrived. Its honey-colored eyes showed a calm and confident expression.
In five minutes, the jaguar was already lying down and in a few seconds would be totally sedated. It was a soft yellow coloured male with very dark spots and rosettes. Working during the day was very special and eventhough we were quite concentrated we could appreciate all the experience and all the details of this big cat.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Male Jaguar
It was a spectacular morning. Being close to this undenger animal is a unique opportunity for those working in conservation and ecotourism. This was a big jaguar male, with powerful muscles, huge paws and prominently large jaw and at the same time showing a smooth behavior. Working with an animal so relaxed made the whole procedure easy to the veterinarian Joares May and the biologist Helder Brandão. Setting the GPS collar, the biometric measurements, the biological sampling, collecting ticks and the monitoring of the vital signs were done quickly.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Male Jaguar
All the work was done on the back of the Onçafari Project vehicle and soon after the animal was placed in a hammock forest to recover itself. At this point the Caiman community had the opportunity to witness this phase of the capture, an important moment for environmental education and awareness of the importance of the jaguar in the ecosystem. This is one of the objectives of the Onçafari Project, stimulated by CENAP: stablish an educational channel of communication among communities, ranchers and researchers.

*This image is copyright of its original author

On the back of the Oncari Project Vehicle
This beautiful cat weighed 110 kg, having all the necessary tools to defend its territory and compete for females. With an estimated age of 7 years old, this jaguar was very healthy with well-preserved teeth and in reproductive period. The jaguar captures for setting the collars and to monitor the territories were a success and the goals were achieved this year. The process of habituating jaguars to vehicles has begun and the future looks very promising. Check out the look of this great jaguar, although still without a specific name. Perhaps with this history someone can come up with an interesting name. Notice that it is a very strong and large male, but yet quite calm and confident, showing signs of struggle with other males and presenting scars on the forehead and face.’
The below maps show the movements of the different Jaguars we have collared around the Caiman Ecological Refuge situated in Southern Pantanel, South America.  To view the original post Click Here

*This image is copyright of its original author

01

*This image is copyright of its original author

02

*This image is copyright of its original author

03
Author: Helder Brandão (environmental manager)

"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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India brotherbear Offline
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#37

from "Records of North America Big Game" a Boone and Crockett Club Publication. This book gives a long list of record jaguars and cougars. Here is a fair comparison showing record animals. I will show the top 2 of each.
Cougar - Score: 16 and 4/16 - Length: 9 and 9/16 - Width: 6 and 11/16 ... Score: 16 and 3/16 - Length: 9 and 8 16 - Width: 6 and 11/16.
Jaguar - Score: 18 and 7/16 - Length: 10 and 15/16 - Width: 7 and 8/16 ... Score: 18 and 5/16 - Length: 10 and 14/16 - Width: 7 and 7/16.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#38

Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Mesoamerican Jaguars (Panthera onca): Implications for Conservation and Management Wultsch, Caragiulo, Dias-Freedman, Quigley, Rabinowitz & Amato, 2016

Abstract:
"Mesoamerican jaguars (Panthera onca) have been extirpated from over 77% of their historic range, inhabiting fragmented landscapes at potentially reduced population sizes. Maintaining and restoring genetic diversity and connectivity across human-altered landscapes has become a major conservation priority; nonetheless large-scale genetic monitoring of natural populations is rare. This is the first regional conservation genetic study of jaguars to primarily use fecal samples collected in the wild across five Mesoamerican countries: Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. We genotyped 445 jaguar fecal samples and examined patterns of genetic diversity and connectivity among 115 individual jaguars using data from 12 microsatellite loci. Overall, moderate levels of genetic variation were detected (NA = 4.50 ± 1.05, AR = 3.43 ± 0.22, HE = 0.59 ± 0.04), with Mexico having the lowest genetic diversity, followed by Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, and Costa Rica. Population-based gene flow measures (FST = 0.09 to 0.15, Dest = 0.09 to 0.21), principal component analysis, and Bayesian clustering applied in a hierarchical framework revealed significant genetic structure in Mesoamerican jaguars, roughly grouping individuals into four genetic clusters with varying levels of admixture. Gene flow was highest among Selva Maya jaguars (northern Guatemala and central Belize), whereas genetic differentiation among all other sampling sites was moderate. Genetic subdivision was most pronounced between Selva Maya and Honduran jaguars, suggesting limited jaguar movement between these close geographic regions and ultimately refuting the hypothesis of contemporary panmixia. To maintain a critical linkage for jaguars dispersing through the Mesoamerican landscape and ensure long-term viability of this near threatened species, we recommend continued management and maintenance of jaguar corridors. The baseline genetic data provided by this study underscores the importance of understanding levels of genetic diversity and connectivity to making informed management and conservation decisions with the goal to maintain functional connectivity across the region."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#39

A biodiversity hotspot losing its top predator: The challenge of jaguar conservation in the Atlantic Forest of South America Paviolo et al., 2016

Abstract:
"The jaguar is the top predator of the Atlantic Forest (AF), which is a highly threatened biodiversity hotspot that occurs in Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina. By combining data sets from 14 research groups across the region, we determine the population status of the jaguar and propose a spatial prioritization for conservation actions. About 85% of the jaguar’s habitat in the AF has been lost and only 7% remains in good condition. Jaguars persist in around 2.8% of the region, and live in very low densities in most of the areas. The population of jaguars in the AF is probably lower than 300 individuals scattered in small sub-populations. We identified seven Jaguar Conservation Units (JCUs) and seven potential JCUs, and only three of these areas may have ≥50 individuals. A connectivity analysis shows that most of the JCUs are isolated. Habitat loss and fragmentation were the major causes for jaguar decline, but human induced mortality is the main threat for the remaining population. We classified areas according to their contribution to jaguar conservation and we recommend management actions for each of them. The methodology in this study could be used for conservation planning of other carnivore species."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#40

Jaguar spotted in the United states

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/news/extr...spartanntp
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United States Pckts Offline
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(12-08-2016, 11:37 PM)Kingtheropod Wrote: Jaguar spotted in the United states

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/video/news/extr...spartanntp

Great news, El Jefe' now has a friend haha
Hopefully this is a sign of things to come
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Implications of Fine-Grained Habitat Fragmentation and Road Mortality for Jaguar Conservation in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil Cullen, Stanton, Lima, Uezu, Perilli & Akçakaya, 2016

Abstract:
"Jaguar (Panthera onca) populations in the Upper Paraná River, in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest region, live in a landscape that includes highly fragmented areas as well as relatively intact ones. We developed a model of jaguar habitat suitability in this region, and based on this habitat model, we developed a spatially structured metapopulation model of the jaguar populations in this area to analyze their viability, the potential impact of road mortality on the populations' persistence, and the interaction between road mortality and habitat fragmentation. In more highly fragmented populations, density of jaguars per unit area is lower and density of roads per jaguar is higher. The populations with the most fragmented habitat were predicted to have much lower persistence in the next 100 years when the model included no dispersal, indicating that the persistence of these populations are dependent to a large extent on dispersal from other populations. This, in turn, indicates that the interaction between road mortality and habitat fragmentation may lead to source-sink dynamics, whereby populations with highly fragmented habitat are maintained only by dispersal from populations with less fragmented habitat. This study demonstrates the utility of linking habitat and demographic models in assessing impacts on species living in fragmented landscapes."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-18-2017, 03:02 AM by Ngala )

Predicting carnivore distribution and extirpation rate based on human impacts and productivity factors; assessment of the state of jaguar (Panthera onca) in Venezuela Jędrzejewskia et al., 2017

Highlights
• Carnivores depend on joint effects of anthropogenic and environmental factors.
• Jaguars disappear faster in dry, unproductive areas.
• Chances of persistence are higher in humid and productive areas.
• Carnivore declines cannot be predicted from human density alone.

Abstract:
"The worldwide decline in carnivore populations has been attributed to various human impacts. However, our understanding of the mechanisms behind these declines is insufficient to predict the timing and location of local extinctions. We collected data on presence/absence and time since extirpation of jaguars across Venezuela. To test if human impacts or ecosystem productivity better explain the observed spatial variation in probability of jaguar occurrence we compared logistic regression models fit with different combinations of anthropogenic and environmental variables. Similarly, we modelled the time since extirpation, using a multiple regression approach. Our study supported the hypothesis that jaguar extirpations and distribution are determined by a joint effect of anthropogenic factors and environmental variables, mainly those related with ecosystem productivity. Human population density and habitat alterations exerted strong negative effects on jaguar populations, while annual precipitation, mean temperature, forest cover, primary productivity, and other vegetation indices had positive effects. The strength of human impact is shaped by ecosystem productivity: jaguars disappear faster in dry, unproductive areas, and survive better in humid, productive areas even when human densities are higher. We estimated that jaguars in Venezuela have been extirpated from approximately 26% of the territory of Venezuela; present jaguar range covers approximately 66% of the country. We demonstrate that human population density alone cannot adequately explain past extirpations nor predict future jaguar declines. We conclude that the predicted future growth of the human population will not necessarily determine jaguar declines, and proper management and conservation programs could potentially prevent jaguar extirpations."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#44

The jaguar's spots are darker than they appear: assessing the global conservation status of the jaguar Panthera onca Antonio de la Torre, González-Maya, Zarza, Ceballos & Medellín, 2017

Abstract:
"The IUCN Red List is widely used to guide conservation policy and practice. However, in most cases the evaluation of a species using IUCN Red List criteria takes into account only the global status of the species. Although subpopulations may be assessed using the IUCN categories and criteria, this rarely occurs, either because it is difficult to identify subpopulations or because of the effort involved. Using the jaguar Panthera onca as a model we illustrate that wide-ranging species that are assigned a particular category of threat based on the IUCN Red List criteria may display considerable heterogeneity within individual taxa in terms of the level of risk they face. Using the information available on the conservation status of the species, we evaluated the jaguar's current geographical range and its subpopulations. We identified the most threatened subpopulations, using the extent of occurrence, area of occupancy, population size and the level of threat to each subpopulation. The main outcome of this analysis was that although a large subpopulation persists in Amazonia, virtually all others are threatened because of their small size, isolation, deficient protection and the high human population density. Based on this approach, future conservation efforts can be prioritized for the most threatened subpopulations. Based on our findings we recommend that for future Red List assessments assessors consider the value of undertaking assessments at the subpopulation level. For the jaguar, sub-global assessments should be included on the Red List as a matter of urgency."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-30-2017, 06:02 PM by Ngala )

Validation of the Calakmul–Laguna de Terminos corridor for jaguars Panthera onca in south-eastern Mexico Hidalgo-Mihart, Contreras-Moreno, Jesús de la Cruz & Juárez-López, 2017

Abstract:
"The fragmentation of jaguar Panthera onca populations as a result of habitat loss is considered to be one of the main challenges for the conservation of the species. Corridors have been proposed as a means of maintaining connectivity and the long-term viability of jaguar populations. The corridor that connects the jaguar conservation units of Calakmul and Laguna de Terminos in Mexico has been considered to be a link for the movement of individuals between these units but its functionality had yet to be verified. During 2012–2014 we divided the corridor into four sections, where we used camera traps to verify the corridor's functionality. We obtained 106 photographs of jaguars, proving the presence of jaguars (including resident jaguars and females) in three of the corridor sections. We did not record any individuals in more than one section of the corridor. The presence of several resident jaguars and females throughout the corridor suggests that portions of the corridor should be incorporated into the Calakmul and Laguna de Terminos jaguar conservation units. Nevertheless, to confirm that the corridor is fully functional it is necessary to obtain evidence of movement of jaguars among the various sections of the corridor. Our results suggest that the area should be included in regional conservation strategies."
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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