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Nature & Animal Art!

United States Polar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-03-2018, 02:08 AM by Polar )

A drawing depicting if a bear and tiger were to co-evolve and breed together in the future...

   
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Spalea Offline
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@Polar :

About #83: a kind of striped " daeodon " ? Wink
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United States Polar Offline
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(03-03-2018, 04:27 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Polar :

About #83: a kind of striped " daeodon " ? Wink

Lol yes!
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Canada Wolverine Away
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( This post was last modified: 03-03-2018, 10:23 AM by Wolverine )

@Spalea I know you like art, look at this wonderfull Polish cartoons of diferent wild animals from European forests. Basically these are advertisements of a Polish beer called "Zubr" ("Wizent"). You can even feel the smell of European forest"

European bison:





Wolves:





Bobr:





Bear:






There are also many other animals.
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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Big cats are amazing tacticians when it comes to hunting, I had imagined for a long time how the big cats might handle a wild bovine if presented to them an efficient hunting scenario 1 on 1.
Especially this illustration is for the diff. horn types and how a cat deals or could deal with it.
1)auroch - a big cat dodges the initial charge of the front pointing horns, distracts the bovine into charging and manuevers around to the flank and hangs on to it. Eventually getting a throat hold.

*This image is copyright of its original author

2) cape buffalo- low curving and wide horn of cape means getting under for a throat grip is rather risky, nor is going for the flanks due to its side reach. a  big cat must dodge and bluff just enough that the bovine presents its muzzle at some point snorting angrily and then latch onto it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

3)wild water buffalo- muzzle hold could be an option but a swift lowering of it's head and it' horn reach will be great and a big cat could be in danger zone in seconds instead being less agile and it's long horn causing some heavy movement at the front end a big cat should be able to get on the backside and hamstring it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

4)bison- muzzle hold could be an option also but its pretty low to the ground and muzzle faces downwards, throat hold presents the same challenge also pendulous beard distracts this attempt, hamstring is another option but this short legged bovine is rather quick on it's feet and manuvers easily to face the threat, safest option is to jump on it's back from side and then begin biting at the spine. yes it's a slow process.

*This image is copyright of its original author

5) gaur- hamstring is also an option, but getting to the backside without it knowing presents a challenge, as much risky as it is, Gaur horns goes high upright , is a tall bovine and a big cat should go for the classic throat bite for this bovine.

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Polar Offline
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Awesome illustration, @Jimmy!
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Spalea Offline
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@Wolverine :

About #86: Marvelous ! We could feel ourselves to be a party of the forest by being an animal too. The sound effects are top, and bravo the super european bison ! And I like especially too the wolves...

@Jimmy :

About #87: Bravo ! Very good strategic sketchs about how to envisage an attack according to the bovid's horns characteristics if we were a big cat...
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-03-2018, 05:44 PM by Jimmy )

Thanks @Polar and @Spalea
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(03-03-2018, 11:31 AM)Jimmy Wrote: Big cats are amazing tacticians when it comes to hunting, I had imagined for a long time how the big cats might handle a wild bovine if presented to them an efficient hunting scenario 1 on 1.
Especially this illustration is for the diff. horn types and how a cat deals or could deal with it.
1)auroch - a big cat dodges the initial charge of the front pointing horns, distracts the bovine into charging and manuevers around to the flank and hangs on to it. Eventually getting a throat hold.

*This image is copyright of its original author

2) cape buffalo- low curving and wide horn of cape means getting under for a throat grip is rather risky, nor is going for the flanks due to its side reach. a  big cat must dodge and bluff just enough that the bovine presents its muzzle at some point snorting angrily and then latch onto it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

3)wild water buffalo- muzzle hold could be an option but a swift lowering of it's head and it' horn reach will be great and a big cat could be in danger zone in seconds instead being less agile and it's long horn causing some heavy movement at the front end a big cat should be able to get on the backside and hamstring it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

4)bison- muzzle hold could be an option also but its pretty low to the ground and muzzle faces downwards, throat hold presents the same challenge also pendulous beard distracts this attempt, hamstring is another option but this short legged bovine is rather quick on it's feet and manuvers easily to face the threat, safest option is to jump on it's back from side and then begin biting at the spine. yes it's a slow process.

*This image is copyright of its original author

5) gaur- hamstring is also an option, but getting to the backside without it knowing presents a challenge, as much risky as it is, Gaur horns goes high upright , is a tall bovine and a big cat should go for the classic throat bite for this bovine.

*This image is copyright of its original author
@Jimmy
Great illustration
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India sanjay Offline
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Simply WOW @Jimmy
Keep the good work man, Awesome
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United States phatio Offline
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(03-03-2018, 11:31 AM)Jimmy Wrote: Big cats are amazing tacticians when it comes to hunting, I had imagined for a long time how the big cats might handle a wild bovine if presented to them an efficient hunting scenario 1 on 1.
Especially this illustration is for the diff. horn types and how a cat deals or could deal with it.
1)auroch - a big cat dodges the initial charge of the front pointing horns, distracts the bovine into charging and manuevers around to the flank and hangs on to it. Eventually getting a throat hold.

*This image is copyright of its original author

2) cape buffalo- low curving and wide horn of cape means getting under for a throat grip is rather risky, nor is going for the flanks due to its side reach. a  big cat must dodge and bluff just enough that the bovine presents its muzzle at some point snorting angrily and then latch onto it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

3)wild water buffalo- muzzle hold could be an option but a swift lowering of it's head and it' horn reach will be great and a big cat could be in danger zone in seconds instead being less agile and it's long horn causing some heavy movement at the front end a big cat should be able to get on the backside and hamstring it.

*This image is copyright of its original author

4)bison- muzzle hold could be an option also but its pretty low to the ground and muzzle faces downwards, throat hold presents the same challenge also pendulous beard distracts this attempt, hamstring is another option but this short legged bovine is rather quick on it's feet and manuvers easily to face the threat, safest option is to jump on it's back from side and then begin biting at the spine. yes it's a slow process.

*This image is copyright of its original author

5) gaur- hamstring is also an option, but getting to the backside without it knowing presents a challenge, as much risky as it is, Gaur horns goes high upright , is a tall bovine and a big cat should go for the classic throat bite for this bovine.

*This image is copyright of its original author
Amazing drawing and well written descriptions @Jimmy.
Keep it coming
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United States phatio Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-04-2018, 10:11 AM by phatio )

Good Morning Richard Parker...

*This image is copyright of its original author

Never lose hope
This one is my tribute to one of my favorite movie :)
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India sanjay Offline
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Phatio, you should consider participating in exhibitions and sell your photos in local. I am sure you will have lot of people to buy it.
May be someone from WildFact is interested in buying ??
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United States Polar Offline
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This particular thread is really getting some traction now. Noticed six guests on this thread simultaneously a few hours ago. Nice to have animal art!
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United States Polar Offline
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The blue hue of my drawing makes it look like the pencil-drawn prime, male polar bear is in his natural chilly habitat....cool arctic breeze....


   
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