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Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars

Balam Offline
Jaguar Enthusiast
*****

(09-26-2020, 01:14 AM)Pckts Wrote: I joined SCI and now have access to their Record Books.

I'll post records of each Big Cats species I can find.

*Date Taken, Location, With which Hunting Program, gun used, Skull Score*

South American Jaguar Top 16 (Only 16 Available)

1. 03/1970 Paraguay, Chaco Finita R 20 12/16" 
2. 06/1971 Brazil, Pantanal Unknown R 20 6/16" 
3. 01/1983 Brazil, Mato Grosso R. Mason / Tony de Almeida R 20 1/16"
4. 08/1986 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 13/16"
5. 09/1978 Brazil, Pantanal R 19 10/16" 
6. 04/1985 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 6/16" 
7. 08/1979 Paraguay, Nueva Asuncion R 18 14/16" 
8. 01/1968 Brazil, Mato Grosso Alberto Machado R 18 3/16" 
9. 06/1969 Colombia R 17 11/16"
10. 05/1969 Brazil, Mato Grosso R 17 10/16"
11. 05/1968 Colombia R 17 7/16" 
12. 01/1970 Brazil, Rio Zingu James Donnely R 17 4/16"
13. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 4/16" 
14. 01/1952 Brazil, Amazon Marlin Perkins / Perkins & Allen Exp. R 17 3/16"
15. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 1/16"
16. 05/1965 Paraguay Rocky R 16 4/16" 

DESCRIPTION (male) South American jaguars are 7-8-1/2 feet in length (2.1-2.6 m), including 18-29 inches (46-74 cm) of tail, stand 27-30 inches (68-76 cm) at the shoulder and weigh 200-230 pounds (91-104 kg), with some individuals considerably larger. Females are approximately 25 percent smaller than males. The largest jaguars are found near the equator, their size diminishing to the north and south. This is the opposite of many other mammals, which tend to decrease in size toward the equator.

The South American jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere, much larger than the jaguar of North America or the cougars from either continent. The largest jaguars of all-heavily built, deep-bodied, with massive forequarters-are found in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil and adjacent parts of Bolivia. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow with black spots that form square-shaped rosettes on head, neck and legs. The underparts are white or light buff with large black blotches. The tail is relatively short, the head is large and broad and the large yellow eyes are placed well forward.

BEHAVIOR Solitary and territorial, the male is a wanderer with a home range twice the size of a female's and overlapping those of several females. There is no fixed breeding season. The female probably mates every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with her for about two years. Life expectancy 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Entirely carnivorous, it preys mostly on capybara, deer and peccaries, also on sloths, tapirs, fish, caimans and snakes. Often kills domestic livestock, which has made it unpopular with ranchers and has led to its persecution. A good tree climber and an excellent swimmer; unlike most cats, it is fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar, but its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forests, preferably dense and especially near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful.

DISTRIBUTION Throughout South America in suitable habitat, except for the extreme south, but primarily in Venezuela, Brazil and Bolivia.

Outside South America, it is found in Central America and Mexico.

REMARKS The South American jaguar is a magnificent animal, the "king of the rain forest," and one of the very top hunting trophies of the Americas or of the world. Any adult male is a fine trophy, but securing one can be difficult. There are several methods. One is by calling, especially at night from a blind or machan. Another is by baiting; after a bait has been hit one can either sit by it at night or follow the jaguar's trail with a pack of dogs. The last can be wet, miserable work during the rainy season, with the dogs swimming much of the time and the hunters following as best they can on foot or horseback, or even by dugout, until the final chase, when all participants are likely to be in the water. Smaller males and most females tend to tree when the dogs get close, but bigger males are likely to stand and fight the dogs on the ground, which can be an unforgettable experience for all concerned. A properly conducted jaguar hunt can be one of the world's great adventures.

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are listed, three in South America and five in North America. South American subspecies are: onca (Amazon jaguar), from the Amazon and Orinoco river basins; peruviana (Peruvian jaguar), from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia; and palustris (Parana jaguar), from southern Brazil and Argentina. We do not separate them.

STATUS In parts of South America, jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975).





North American Jaguars
1. 01/1993 Mexico, Ocosingo Rudolfo Santillan R 19 8/16" 
2. 03/1965 Mexico, Sinaloa Hugo Castellanos R 18 9/16" 
3. 01/1950 Mexico, Sonora R 17 10/16"
4. 08/1981 Costa Rica, Guanacaste Floriberto Alfaro R 17 6/16" 
5. 03/1987 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. Julio de Coso R 17 4/16" 
6. 04/1981 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 17 2/16" 
7. 02/1965 Mexico, Nayarit Heriberto Parra Paerg R 16 10/16"
8. 08/1987 Mexico, Campeche Ignacio Padilla R 16 9/16" 
9. 02/1965 Belize Curtis Prock R 16 8/16" 
10. 03/1974 Mexico, Campeche R 16 8/16"
11. 06/1979 Mexico, El Tepehuaje Tony Rivera R 16 7/16" 
12. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 5/16" 
13. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 4/16" 
14. 05/1982 Mexico, Jalisco Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
15. 05/1986 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
16. 04/1971 Belize, Orange Walk Curtis Prock R 15 15/16" 
17. 01/1968 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. R 15 14/16" 
18. 12/1970 Mexico, Sonora R 15 14/16" 
19. 08/1966 Belize John Littlejohn / Tiger Safaris H 15 13/16" 
20. 01/1964 Belize, n. border Daniel Tillet R 15 8/16"

DESCRIPTION (male) Adult North American jaguars are 6-8 feet (1.8-2.4 m) in length, including 18-24 inches (46-61 cm) of tail. Shoulder height 25-30 inches (64-76 cm). Weight 100-160 pounds (45-75 kg), sometimes more. Females are about 25 percent smaller than males. Chromosome count is 38.

The jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere. About the same length and height as the cougar, but more compactly and powerfully built. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow, with whitish or light buff underparts. There are black spots on head, neck and legs, and large black blotches on the underparts. The back and sides have large black rosettes with one or more black spots in the center. The tail is relatively short, with strong black markings toward the tip. Black, or melanistic, individuals are fairly common, but their spots can still be seen faintly.

BEHAVIOR The male is solitary and territorial, a wanderer with a home range that is twice the size of a female's and will overlap those of several females. Breeding usually takes place in the spring in northern areas, but there is no fixed season in the tropics. Females mate every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with the mother for about two years. Full growth and sexual maturity are reached in 3-4 years. Life expectancy about 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Jaguars are entirely carnivorous, preying largely on peccaries and deer, but also on smaller mammals, fish and snakes. They often kill domestic livestock, which has made them unpopular with ranchers and has led to their persecution. They are good tree climbers and excellent swimmers; unlike most cats, they are fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a so-called "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar; however, its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forest, preferably dense and near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful there. Found in scrub and desert in northern parts of its range.

DISTRIBUTION Mexico and Central America. Wanderers occasionally occur as far north as Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Also found throughout South America, except in the extreme south (South American jaguars are larger than those in North America).

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are usually recognized, five from North America and three from South America. The North American subspecies are: arizonensis (Arizona jaguar) from Sonora, Arizona and New Mexico, pale buff in color with rosettes broken into spots; hernandisii (Pacific Coast jaguar) from a narrow strip along the Pacific coast from Sonora to Oaxaca, with broken-up, barely perceptible rosettes; veraecrucis (Gulf Coast jaguar) from the coastal forests along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Veracruz; goldmani (Yucatan jaguar) from the Yucatan Peninsula, with a bold, intense color pattern; and centralis (Central American jaguar) from Guatemala to Panama and extending into Colombia in South America, a small form with distinct rosettes. All North American subspecies are combined for record-keeping.

STATUS In parts of Mexico and Central America (and also in South America), jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock, and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars everywhere are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975). They may not be imported into the United States, which is unfortunate for U.S. residents, as the jaguar has always been considered one of the top hunting trophies of the Americas and of the world.

REMARKS The University of Mexico has been authorized by the Mexican government to conduct a jaguar study program whereby a limited number of jaguars are darted and tranquilized, photographed, measured, aged, fitted with radio collars and revived so that their movements and numbers can be monitored and evaluated. The jaguar is baited and/or trailed by a pack of dogs until it climbs a tree where it can be darted. A wildlife biologist provided by the university or an official of the biosphere reserve accompanies the darting expedition, and care is taken to assure that the jaguar is not harmed. For a fee (which is used to support the program), sportsmen are permitted to take part in these non-lethal hunts and to fire the dart gun. This program is coordinated in Mexico by United for Conservation, a Mexican non-profit organization directed by SCI member Carlos Manterola. In the early stages of this program it was coordinated by the late David Hanlin.

SCI accepts Record Book entries for jaguars (and incidental cougars) darted as part of this study, and uses body measurements taken by the field biologist to arrive at the score.

Excellent! Nice to see this records and they confirm what I've been saying for a whole about Chaco jaguars being among the largest as well @peter you might want to take a look at those measurements.

I also wonder which region of Colombia those skulls belong to, but judging their sizes, I'm guessing these are Llanos individuals which is very valuable information as well.
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United States Pckts Offline
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(09-26-2020, 02:53 AM)Balam Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 01:14 AM)Pckts Wrote: I joined SCI and now have access to their Record Books.

I'll post records of each Big Cats species I can find.

*Date Taken, Location, With which Hunting Program, gun used, Skull Score*

South American Jaguar Top 16 (Only 16 Available)

1. 03/1970 Paraguay, Chaco Finita R 20 12/16" 
2. 06/1971 Brazil, Pantanal Unknown R 20 6/16" 
3. 01/1983 Brazil, Mato Grosso R. Mason / Tony de Almeida R 20 1/16"
4. 08/1986 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 13/16"
5. 09/1978 Brazil, Pantanal R 19 10/16" 
6. 04/1985 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 6/16" 
7. 08/1979 Paraguay, Nueva Asuncion R 18 14/16" 
8. 01/1968 Brazil, Mato Grosso Alberto Machado R 18 3/16" 
9. 06/1969 Colombia R 17 11/16"
10. 05/1969 Brazil, Mato Grosso R 17 10/16"
11. 05/1968 Colombia R 17 7/16" 
12. 01/1970 Brazil, Rio Zingu James Donnely R 17 4/16"
13. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 4/16" 
14. 01/1952 Brazil, Amazon Marlin Perkins / Perkins & Allen Exp. R 17 3/16"
15. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 1/16"
16. 05/1965 Paraguay Rocky R 16 4/16" 

DESCRIPTION (male) South American jaguars are 7-8-1/2 feet in length (2.1-2.6 m), including 18-29 inches (46-74 cm) of tail, stand 27-30 inches (68-76 cm) at the shoulder and weigh 200-230 pounds (91-104 kg), with some individuals considerably larger. Females are approximately 25 percent smaller than males. The largest jaguars are found near the equator, their size diminishing to the north and south. This is the opposite of many other mammals, which tend to decrease in size toward the equator.

The South American jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere, much larger than the jaguar of North America or the cougars from either continent. The largest jaguars of all-heavily built, deep-bodied, with massive forequarters-are found in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil and adjacent parts of Bolivia. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow with black spots that form square-shaped rosettes on head, neck and legs. The underparts are white or light buff with large black blotches. The tail is relatively short, the head is large and broad and the large yellow eyes are placed well forward.

BEHAVIOR Solitary and territorial, the male is a wanderer with a home range twice the size of a female's and overlapping those of several females. There is no fixed breeding season. The female probably mates every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with her for about two years. Life expectancy 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Entirely carnivorous, it preys mostly on capybara, deer and peccaries, also on sloths, tapirs, fish, caimans and snakes. Often kills domestic livestock, which has made it unpopular with ranchers and has led to its persecution. A good tree climber and an excellent swimmer; unlike most cats, it is fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar, but its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forests, preferably dense and especially near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful.

DISTRIBUTION Throughout South America in suitable habitat, except for the extreme south, but primarily in Venezuela, Brazil and Bolivia.

Outside South America, it is found in Central America and Mexico.

REMARKS The South American jaguar is a magnificent animal, the "king of the rain forest," and one of the very top hunting trophies of the Americas or of the world. Any adult male is a fine trophy, but securing one can be difficult. There are several methods. One is by calling, especially at night from a blind or machan. Another is by baiting; after a bait has been hit one can either sit by it at night or follow the jaguar's trail with a pack of dogs. The last can be wet, miserable work during the rainy season, with the dogs swimming much of the time and the hunters following as best they can on foot or horseback, or even by dugout, until the final chase, when all participants are likely to be in the water. Smaller males and most females tend to tree when the dogs get close, but bigger males are likely to stand and fight the dogs on the ground, which can be an unforgettable experience for all concerned. A properly conducted jaguar hunt can be one of the world's great adventures.

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are listed, three in South America and five in North America. South American subspecies are: onca (Amazon jaguar), from the Amazon and Orinoco river basins; peruviana (Peruvian jaguar), from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia; and palustris (Parana jaguar), from southern Brazil and Argentina. We do not separate them.

STATUS In parts of South America, jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975).





North American Jaguars
1. 01/1993 Mexico, Ocosingo Rudolfo Santillan R 19 8/16" 
2. 03/1965 Mexico, Sinaloa Hugo Castellanos R 18 9/16" 
3. 01/1950 Mexico, Sonora R 17 10/16"
4. 08/1981 Costa Rica, Guanacaste Floriberto Alfaro R 17 6/16" 
5. 03/1987 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. Julio de Coso R 17 4/16" 
6. 04/1981 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 17 2/16" 
7. 02/1965 Mexico, Nayarit Heriberto Parra Paerg R 16 10/16"
8. 08/1987 Mexico, Campeche Ignacio Padilla R 16 9/16" 
9. 02/1965 Belize Curtis Prock R 16 8/16" 
10. 03/1974 Mexico, Campeche R 16 8/16"
11. 06/1979 Mexico, El Tepehuaje Tony Rivera R 16 7/16" 
12. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 5/16" 
13. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 4/16" 
14. 05/1982 Mexico, Jalisco Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
15. 05/1986 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
16. 04/1971 Belize, Orange Walk Curtis Prock R 15 15/16" 
17. 01/1968 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. R 15 14/16" 
18. 12/1970 Mexico, Sonora R 15 14/16" 
19. 08/1966 Belize John Littlejohn / Tiger Safaris H 15 13/16" 
20. 01/1964 Belize, n. border Daniel Tillet R 15 8/16"

DESCRIPTION (male) Adult North American jaguars are 6-8 feet (1.8-2.4 m) in length, including 18-24 inches (46-61 cm) of tail. Shoulder height 25-30 inches (64-76 cm). Weight 100-160 pounds (45-75 kg), sometimes more. Females are about 25 percent smaller than males. Chromosome count is 38.

The jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere. About the same length and height as the cougar, but more compactly and powerfully built. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow, with whitish or light buff underparts. There are black spots on head, neck and legs, and large black blotches on the underparts. The back and sides have large black rosettes with one or more black spots in the center. The tail is relatively short, with strong black markings toward the tip. Black, or melanistic, individuals are fairly common, but their spots can still be seen faintly.

BEHAVIOR The male is solitary and territorial, a wanderer with a home range that is twice the size of a female's and will overlap those of several females. Breeding usually takes place in the spring in northern areas, but there is no fixed season in the tropics. Females mate every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with the mother for about two years. Full growth and sexual maturity are reached in 3-4 years. Life expectancy about 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Jaguars are entirely carnivorous, preying largely on peccaries and deer, but also on smaller mammals, fish and snakes. They often kill domestic livestock, which has made them unpopular with ranchers and has led to their persecution. They are good tree climbers and excellent swimmers; unlike most cats, they are fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a so-called "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar; however, its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forest, preferably dense and near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful there. Found in scrub and desert in northern parts of its range.

DISTRIBUTION Mexico and Central America. Wanderers occasionally occur as far north as Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Also found throughout South America, except in the extreme south (South American jaguars are larger than those in North America).

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are usually recognized, five from North America and three from South America. The North American subspecies are: arizonensis (Arizona jaguar) from Sonora, Arizona and New Mexico, pale buff in color with rosettes broken into spots; hernandisii (Pacific Coast jaguar) from a narrow strip along the Pacific coast from Sonora to Oaxaca, with broken-up, barely perceptible rosettes; veraecrucis (Gulf Coast jaguar) from the coastal forests along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Veracruz; goldmani (Yucatan jaguar) from the Yucatan Peninsula, with a bold, intense color pattern; and centralis (Central American jaguar) from Guatemala to Panama and extending into Colombia in South America, a small form with distinct rosettes. All North American subspecies are combined for record-keeping.

STATUS In parts of Mexico and Central America (and also in South America), jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock, and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars everywhere are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975). They may not be imported into the United States, which is unfortunate for U.S. residents, as the jaguar has always been considered one of the top hunting trophies of the Americas and of the world.

REMARKS The University of Mexico has been authorized by the Mexican government to conduct a jaguar study program whereby a limited number of jaguars are darted and tranquilized, photographed, measured, aged, fitted with radio collars and revived so that their movements and numbers can be monitored and evaluated. The jaguar is baited and/or trailed by a pack of dogs until it climbs a tree where it can be darted. A wildlife biologist provided by the university or an official of the biosphere reserve accompanies the darting expedition, and care is taken to assure that the jaguar is not harmed. For a fee (which is used to support the program), sportsmen are permitted to take part in these non-lethal hunts and to fire the dart gun. This program is coordinated in Mexico by United for Conservation, a Mexican non-profit organization directed by SCI member Carlos Manterola. In the early stages of this program it was coordinated by the late David Hanlin.

SCI accepts Record Book entries for jaguars (and incidental cougars) darted as part of this study, and uses body measurements taken by the field biologist to arrive at the score.

Excellent! Nice to see this records and they confirm what I've been saying for a whole about Chaco jaguars being among the largest as well @peter you might want to take a look at those measurements.

I also wonder which region of Colombia those skulls belong to, but judging their sizes, I'm guessing these are Llanos individuals which is very valuable information as well.

They are up there for sure.... Almeida also knew of a 21'' Scoring skull but obviously it didn't make the SCI record book info.

They also have Darted scores but unfortunately I'm not sure how they are getting the total?

I assume it's body measurements and I'll post the description below:

I'll post below just for interest sake

North American Top 20 Darting Score
1. 02/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 139 3/8" 
2. 04/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 132 2/8"
3. 05/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 132 2/8"
4. 02/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 130 1/8" 
5. 03/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 130 1/8"
6. 05/2002 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 124 4/8"
7. 05/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 123 5/8" 
8. 05/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 121 1/8" 
9. 05/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 121 1/8" 
10. 01/2002 Mexico, Quintana Roo Tony Rivera / Projects Jaguar D 120 4/8"
11. 05/1996 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 118 4/8" 
12. 05/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 117 6/8" 
13. 03/1998 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera / Antonio Rivera & Son D 116 6/8"
14. 03/2003 Mexico, Quintana Roo Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 113 4/8" 
15. 03/1998 Mexico, Campeche Antonio Rivera & Son D 112 6/8"
16. 03/2003 Mexico, Quintana Roo Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 112 5/8" 
17. 04/2001 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera / ECO Safaris D 112 1/8"
18. 04/1997 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 110 7/8"
19. 07/1996 Mexico, Campeche Tony Rivera D 106 2/8"
20. 06/2004 Mexico, Cozumel Tony Rivera D 95 3/8" 


REMARKS The University of Mexico has been authorized by the Mexican government to conduct a jaguar study program whereby a limited number of jaguars are darted and tranquilized, photographed, measured, aged, fitted with radio collars and revived so that their movements and numbers can be monitored and evaluated. The jaguar is baited and/or trailed by a pack of dogs until it climbs a tree where it can be darted. A wildlife biologist provided by the university or an official of the biosphere reserve accompanies the darting expedition, and care is taken to assure that the jaguar is not harmed. For a fee (which is used to support the program), sportsmen are permitted to take part in these non-lethal hunts and to fire the dart gun. This program is coordinated in Mexico by United for Conservation, a Mexican non-profit organization directed by SCI member Carlos Manterola. In the early stages of this program it was coordinated by the late David Hanlin.

SCI accepts Record Book entries for jaguars (and incidental cougars) darted as part of this study, and uses body measurements taken by the field biologist to arrive at the score.

South America Darting Score (Only 5 available) but it was done in Chaco so you can see some info on their body measurements and compare. 


1. 06/2009 Paraguay, Chaco McBride Hunting Services / Rocky McBride D 160" 1 1
2. 07/2008 Paraguay McBride Hunting Services / Rocky McBride D 156 5/8" 2 2
3. 07/2011 Paraguay, Aurora Rocky McBride D 152 2/8" 3 3
4. 07/2012 Paraguay, Chaco McBride Hunting Services / Rocky McBride D 150 1/8" 4 4
5. 07/2008 Paraguay, Chaco Faro Maro / Rocky McBride D 148 7/8" 5
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 04:09 AM by Pckts )

Nvm, I found the form for darting measurements.

*This image is copyright of its original author


For Comparison, Here's Joker

Joker was 236 cm long (from the head to the tip of the tail), 76 cm tall, 126 cm of chest circumference, 66 cm of neck circumference

Since we don't have his Head Circumference, we're unable to get a full score.
But with his body and chest he'd be 141.9" without his head but we can use Shaka's head and add it.

Shaka's Score
Shaka's body measured 237 cm in length (head: 37 cm, body: 135, tail: 65)
Chest circumference: 108, neck: 64

Shaka's Score is 150.3"
Joker's Score w/Shaka's Head is 156.46"

*One quick side note before we compare exactly*
I'm asking Edu to provide both Shaka and Jokers head circumference so we can be sure I'm using the right measurement. Because I think the 37cm is just the length of head not width. 
I'll confirm that when he gets back to me. 
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Balam Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 07:38 AM by Balam )

@Pckts indeed, those Chaco jaguars are huge as well and those measurements don't lie, that's why I don't doubt the estimates we got for Aries of 120-130 kg. We also have those huge pugmarks of 15 cm in length from the Argentinian Chaco.

I'm looking forward to seeing more about the measurements of Shaka and Joker. Could you also ask Edu about the state of the captures that were scheduled for this month?
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 06:48 PM by Dark Jaguar )

@Balam

The male 151.353 of 94 kg from Mariana Furtado shall be removed from the table, he is included twice, note the same ID on top of the other.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Check him bellow at the original table of Mariana Furtado on his 2 captures.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Male 151.353

1st capture in December 5th 2004, weighed 94 kg

2nd capture in March 30th 2006, weighed 96 kg

Thus lets keep him on his second capture and remove his first one with 94kg.




ALSO I just noticed the Cerrado males IDed as 151.633 (2), 150.260 (2) and Macharão (2) they shall be removed too from the Cerrado jags table, For the same reasons of the pantanal male above. they captured twice in different times.



The Pantanal table have 59# jaguars. without the Moreira sourced male ( which is Matheus Manco already included ) and this male 151.353.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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(09-26-2020, 06:56 PM)Balam Wrote: I have made a couple of changes to the table.

First of all, I eliminated the repeated jaguar by Furtado as Dark Jaguar stated. I also deleted the capture from Moreira, for some reason as I was reviewing the table and something told me to ensure that said jaguar was not an individual already captured before, so I went to the original post as I had doubts it might've been Matheus and then I reread a previous post by Dark Jaguar on here where it confirmed it was him, I had skipped that portion of the post and was unaware of it.
Finally, I added the proper source for the 142 kg jaguar from northern Pantanal and changed the link to the name of the organization that captured it which is Panthera. A few things about this capture that I want to comment on is that much like Lopez, this jaguar topped the scale to the max at 315 lbs or 142 kg, meaning it could've been heavier than that. But for now, we'll retain the value of 142 kg as that is the official value stated by Panthera. Video of the capture.

The direct link to te updated table can be found in the Index thread, so to those looking for the updated version please visit the thread. I'm gonna post the updated one here to avoid confusion, but for future updates please check the indexed post. The sample remains at 59 animals after the deductions I made today:


*This image is copyright of its original author

148 kg Lopez male source is also by Panthera.
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Dark Jaguar Offline
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The cerrado jaguars table will be down to 13 individuals, Hopefully in the future we'll get more cerrado males, I still didn't give up to find out Rogério size as we already know he is in the 100's kg range.
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 07:19 PM by Dark Jaguar )

(09-26-2020, 07:09 PM)Balam Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 07:05 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: The cerrado jaguars table will be down to 13 individuals, Hopefully in the future we'll get more cerrado males, I still didn't give up to find out Rogério size as we already know he is in the 100's kg range.

I'm guessing some males are being repeated, let me know so we can make the changes. It'd be amazing not only to get Rogerio's but also that cattle-killing male I mentioned to you a couple of months ago. I'm aware that convincing IOP to release this data will be hard, but hopefully we can get it.


the Cerrado males to be removed are the ones IDed as 151.633 (2), 150.260 (2) and Macharão (2).


Could you believe I even tried to get cerrado jaguars size like Rogério,Patrícia,Ariane... by the vet guy from IOP ??  Funny  

but I got nothing.

Its incredible how hard it is to get info from them, its almost impossible.



that cerrado male captured in 2014 with the carcass is definitely larger than Tiago IMO.
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 07:33 PM by Dark Jaguar )

(09-26-2020, 07:23 PM)Balam Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 07:15 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 07:09 PM)Balam Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 07:05 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: The cerrado jaguars table will be down to 13 individuals, Hopefully in the future we'll get more cerrado males, I still didn't give up to find out Rogério size as we already know he is in the 100's kg range.

I'm guessing some males are being repeated, let me know so we can make the changes. It'd be amazing not only to get Rogerio's but also that cattle-killing male I mentioned to you a couple of months ago. I'm aware that convincing IOP to release this data will be hard, but hopefully we can get it.


the Cerrado males to be removed are the ones IDed as 151.633 (2), 150.260 (2) and Macharão (2).


Could you believe I even tried to get cerrado jaguars size like Rogério,Patrícia,Ariane... by the vet guy from IOP ??  Funny  

but I got nothing.

Its incredible how hard it is to get info from them, its almost impossible.



that cerrado male captured in 2014 with the carcass is definitely larger than Tiago IMO.

With the deduction of the repeated captures the average is 100 kg, which I think is accurate for this population and not for Pantanal ones as some people keep trying to push (but let me not get into this again lol). Anyways, let's hope for more weights to be released so this table can fill up nicely.

Btw, if you are frustrated by the secrecy of IOP, imagine how I'm feeling after trying for months to get the weights for Aurora jaguars from Panthera and them refusing to provide them, it's killing me, I want to start working on the Llanos table immediately. 


*This image is copyright of its original author


What surprises me the most above all this is that the weight is just the basic data, there's no harm letting other people know it, they could just answer by taping the number of the weight of the animal like ''***kg'' and thats all, thats all we want. its so simple but yet we get refused by most in every way by unknown reasons (maybe bad mood?? Grin ).

Even at title with the animal there's no harm saying how many kg it weighed. Many years back I thought getting the weight of the captured animals would be the easiest data to get for being the basic one, but I was wrong.

But I am not giving up and I'll bombard them with these same questions as much as possible until they release it. Even already knowing they won't.
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( This post was last modified: 09-26-2020, 08:20 PM by Dark Jaguar )

(09-26-2020, 06:56 PM)Balam Wrote: I have made a couple of changes to the table.

First of all, I eliminated the repeated jaguar by Furtado as Dark Jaguar stated. I also deleted the capture from Moreira, for some reason as I was reviewing the table and something told me to ensure that said jaguar was not an individual already captured before, so I went to the original post as I had doubts it might've been Matheus and then I reread a previous post by Dark Jaguar on here where it confirmed it was him, I had skipped that portion of the post and was unaware of it.
Finally, I added the proper source for the 142 kg jaguar from northern Pantanal and changed the link to the name of the organization that captured it which is Panthera. A few things about this capture that I want to comment on is that much like Lopez, this jaguar topped the scale to the max at 315 lbs or 142 kg, meaning it could've been heavier than that. But for now, we'll retain the value of 142 kg as that is the official value stated by Panthera. Video of the capture.

The direct link to te updated table can be found in the Index thread, so to those looking for the updated version please visit the thread. I'm gonna post the updated one here to avoid confusion, but for future updates please check the indexed post. The sample remains at 59 animals after the deductions I made today:


*This image is copyright of its original author


@Balam

could you send me the link of the Index Thread where the pantanal/cerrado tables are?? I can't find it.
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Balam Offline
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(09-26-2020, 08:18 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-26-2020, 06:56 PM)Balam Wrote: I have made a couple of changes to the table.

First of all, I eliminated the repeated jaguar by Furtado as Dark Jaguar stated. I also deleted the capture from Moreira, for some reason as I was reviewing the table and something told me to ensure that said jaguar was not an individual already captured before, so I went to the original post as I had doubts it might've been Matheus and then I reread a previous post by Dark Jaguar on here where it confirmed it was him, I had skipped that portion of the post and was unaware of it.
Finally, I added the proper source for the 142 kg jaguar from northern Pantanal and changed the link to the name of the organization that captured it which is Panthera. A few things about this capture that I want to comment on is that much like Lopez, this jaguar topped the scale to the max at 315 lbs or 142 kg, meaning it could've been heavier than that. But for now, we'll retain the value of 142 kg as that is the official value stated by Panthera. Video of the capture.

The direct link to te updated table can be found in the Index thread, so to those looking for the updated version please visit the thread. I'm gonna post the updated one here to avoid confusion, but for future updates please check the indexed post. The sample remains at 59 animals after the deductions I made today:


*This image is copyright of its original author


@Balam

could you send me the link of the Index Thread where the pantanal/cerrado tables are?? I can't find it.

Here
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United States Pckts Offline
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(09-26-2020, 03:37 AM)Pckts Wrote: Nvm, I found the form for darting measurements.

*This image is copyright of its original author


For Comparison, Here's Joker

Joker was 236 cm long (from the head to the tip of the tail), 76 cm tall, 126 cm of chest circumference, 66 cm of neck circumference

Since we don't have his Head Circumference, we're unable to get a full score.
But with his body and chest he'd be 141.9" without his head but we can use Shaka's head and add it.

Shaka's Score
Shaka's body measured 237 cm in length (head: 37 cm, body: 135, tail: 65)
Chest circumference: 108, neck: 64

Shaka's Score is 150.3"
Joker's Score w/Shaka's Head is 156.46"

*One quick side note before we compare exactly*
I'm asking Edu to provide both Shaka and Jokers head circumference so we can be sure I'm using the right measurement. Because I think the 37cm is just the length of head not width. 
I'll confirm that when he gets back to me. 

I'm still waiting to here back from Edu but I'm going to use Almeida's head circumference info.

Almeida's info below:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Even if we use the average head circumference of 27.77" which im sure Joker is larger than that, his score would still be a massive 169" which would surpass any of the Chaco Males scores from darting.
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Canada TheNormalGuy Offline
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I did not know where to post this. Sorry for the inconvenience

I recently started my own youtube channel !

I asked for permission to use from another youtuber for my first video and the second video (this one) is mine. I took it 7 days ago at the Granby Zoo, Qc, Canada

Enjoy and don't forget to like or subscribe [don't want to be egoist with that, but ille say it anyways]










@Balam the jaguar on the video is a jaguaress, right ? 

Others picture i took of the jaguars (they were and are 3)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Quote:
^this one is certainly a male. He dwarf the jaguaress of the video. She joined him at one point and the size difference was really obvious.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:^Female of the video

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"


*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female of the video tail's" & what i assume to be a male [the third jaguar of the exhibit]"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"
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Balam Offline
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(09-28-2020, 09:49 AM)TheNormalGuy Wrote:
I did not know where to post this. Sorry for the inconvenience

I recently started my own youtube channel !

I asked for permission to use from another youtuber for my first video and the second video (this one) is mine. I took it 7 days ago at the Granby Zoo, Qc, Canada

Enjoy and don't forget to like or subscribe [don't want to be egoist with that, but ille say it anyways]










@Balam the jaguar on the video is a jaguaress, right ? 

Others picture i took of the jaguars (they were and are 3)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Quote:
^this one is certainly a male. He dwarf the jaguaress of the video. She joined him at one point and the size difference was really obvious.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:^Female of the video

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"


*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female of the video tail's" & what i assume to be a male [the third jaguar of the exhibit]"

*This image is copyright of its original author
Quote:"Female from the video"


Really nice picture Christopher, I'm sure that's a female and my guess is that most of their genotype comes from Central America or Mexico. This is the perfect thread to share your videos and pictures. I might take a walk at the zoo here in Toronto as well now that I'm seeing your pictures, there's also a sanctuary in the province that has the only lion-jaguar hybrids.
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A bit more photos on Thor male's capture in order to collect his semen.

Credits: Richard Rasmussen who also followed the capture.



Gediendson - ''The capture is the most important moment we observed on these animals but in reality on the case of the Jaguar, it will want to charge at us.''.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author




Measurements taken.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author





Here's the best moment of the capture.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author






*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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