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Lions of Timbavati

Australia Herekitty Offline
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Lions of Tintswalo: The Buffalo Are Back! Words by Paul Steyn, images by Neil Jennings, November 28, 2018

The summer rains have arrived, the plains are beginning to burst with grass, and that means one important thing: the big herds of buffalo are moving into the area, and it’s going to be an interesting time for the legendary buffalo hunters of the Manyeleti. As we’ve written before, the Lions of Tintswalo are renowned for their ability to bring down big buffaloes in dramatic showdowns that display their immense strength, strategy and resilience. Now, with the green shoots appearing on the plains, the buffalo are back and we are preparing for some exhilarating sightings in the months to come.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Tintswalo’s regular prides have been out and about, and we’ve already enjoyed a few amazing sightings as the prey animals congregate around the water sources after the rains. Just this month, we have seen five different prides and three different coalitions of lions. The Mbiri Pride has not wasted any time with the buffalo herds, and recently took down a large bull. With all these kills, the Mbiri pride is looking incredibly healthy and strong. The sub adults are going to be big, mature lions and will soon be a force to be reckoned with, cementing their reputation as the Manyeleti’s ultimate hunting pride.
In one incredible moment, the Nharu Pride managed to bring down a young giraffe. But as they were beginning to gorge themselves, the Mbiri Pride charged in and stole the kill in a fit of rage. The sounds of the battle echoed over us as the two resident prides, so well-known by all our guests, battled it out over the carcass.
A few of the Nharus ran off, but, amazingly, some of them remained behind, determined not to lose their carcass without a fight. Perhaps to avoid further conflict, the Mbiris let these other lions feed on the carcass, and we were treated to an amazing sighting of the two prides eating together. None of the lions from either pride were injured in the fights. Perhaps these battles get to the point where the lions all realise that it’s better to share the food, rather than fight and hurt each other in the process. Or maybe, after so many years sharing similar territories, the lions know each other so well, and are willing to suspend their territorial instincts and share.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Mbiris really are a force to be reckoned with, and it seems they don’t go for long without a meal. Last month, The pride found an elephant carcass that had died of old age. The pride spent a lot of time with the old Avoca Males at the carcass, and as you can imagine, there was a lot of meat to go around, and this provided days of viewing for our guests.
In other sightings, the Talamati pride was seen in the south, with one young Avoca Male, feeding on a wildebeest carcass. These males are amazing specimens and we are sure we will see little cubs soon! The Koppies pride is looking great and we viewed them on multiple occasions with two males growing in stature and into an impressive size.
We’ve also encountered a new and interesting pride in the far north of the reserve, made up of seven females and five cubs. It’s always wonderful to find new lions! A whole new dynamic is brought into the region as they make themselves known to the other lions. We will be referring to this new pride as the Orpen Pride, and the two large males that move with them as the Orpen Males. These two males are very impressive and are moving further south into the reserve, becoming a threat to the Koppies males. It will be fascinating to see where this all leads!

*This image is copyright of its original author

It seems there might be cubs on the horizon here too. The Young Avoca males have been hanging around with the Talamati females in the South. Up in the North, the Koppies Pride has been doing very well with the Red Road male and are covering large areas through the reserve.
As always, the Lions of Tintswalo are in constant change and flux, as power dynamics shift and new blood arrives on the reserve. It’s important to remain up to date about who is who, so here’s the current breakdown of all the lions currently living near Tintswalo Safari Lodge.
Orpen pride: 2x males, between 4-6 females and cubs of about 5 months.
Male in pride is known as ‘Junior Nkuhuma’, originally from the northern Sabi sands and Southern Manyeleti where the Nkuhuma pride rule their territory.
Koppies pride with Red Road male 3 females, 1 young male of about 1.5 years old
Birmingham pride: 2-5 females, 2 young males of about 3 years old, pretty much independent now
Mbiri pride: 11 individuals plus Nharu young male, 4 females, 7 sub adults about 2 years old, 1 young Nharu male 3 years old
3 Avoca\Giraffe males Age about 10 years
Nharu Pride 11 - 3 females, 8 sub adults about 3 years old
Talamati pride 5 females
Avoca males 3 males about 5 years old
Nkuhuma pride Last time we saw them there were 11 animals
Torchwood pride Last time we saw them there were 10 animals
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United States Peteporker Offline
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Herekitty Wrote:Lions of Tintswalo: The Buffalo Are Back! Words by Paul Steyn, images by Neil Jennings, November 28, 2018

The summer rains have arrived, the plains are beginning to burst with grass, and that means one important thing: the big herds of buffalo are moving into the area, and it’s going to be an interesting time for the legendary buffalo hunters of the Manyeleti. As we’ve written before, the Lions of Tintswalo are renowned for their ability to bring down big buffaloes in dramatic showdowns that display their immense strength, strategy and resilience. Now, with the green shoots appearing on the plains, the buffalo are back and we are preparing for some exhilarating sightings in the months to come.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Tintswalo’s regular prides have been out and about, and we’ve already enjoyed a few amazing sightings as the prey animals congregate around the water sources after the rains. Just this month, we have seen five different prides and three different coalitions of lions. The Mbiri Pride has not wasted any time with the buffalo herds, and recently took down a large bull. With all these kills, the Mbiri pride is looking incredibly healthy and strong. The sub adults are going to be big, mature lions and will soon be a force to be reckoned with, cementing their reputation as the Manyeleti’s ultimate hunting pride.
In one incredible moment, the Nharu Pride managed to bring down a young giraffe. But as they were beginning to gorge themselves, the Mbiri Pride charged in and stole the kill in a fit of rage. The sounds of the battle echoed over us as the two resident prides, so well-known by all our guests, battled it out over the carcass.
A few of the Nharus ran off, but, amazingly, some of them remained behind, determined not to lose their carcass without a fight. Perhaps to avoid further conflict, the Mbiris let these other lions feed on the carcass, and we were treated to an amazing sighting of the two prides eating together. None of the lions from either pride were injured in the fights. Perhaps these battles get to the point where the lions all realise that it’s better to share the food, rather than fight and hurt each other in the process. Or maybe, after so many years sharing similar territories, the lions know each other so well, and are willing to suspend their territorial instincts and share.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Mbiris really are a force to be reckoned with, and it seems they don’t go for long without a meal. Last month, The pride found an elephant carcass that had died of old age. The pride spent a lot of time with the old Avoca Males at the carcass, and as you can imagine, there was a lot of meat to go around, and this provided days of viewing for our guests.
In other sightings, the Talamati pride was seen in the south, with one young Avoca Male, feeding on a wildebeest carcass. These males are amazing specimens and we are sure we will see little cubs soon! The Koppies pride is looking great and we viewed them on multiple occasions with two males growing in stature and into an impressive size.
We’ve also encountered a new and interesting pride in the far north of the reserve, made up of seven females and five cubs. It’s always wonderful to find new lions! A whole new dynamic is brought into the region as they make themselves known to the other lions. We will be referring to this new pride as the Orpen Pride, and the two large males that move with them as the Orpen Males. These two males are very impressive and are moving further south into the reserve, becoming a threat to the Koppies males. It will be fascinating to see where this all leads!

*This image is copyright of its original author

It seems there might be cubs on the horizon here too. The Young Avoca males have been hanging around with the Talamati females in the South. Up in the North, the Koppies Pride has been doing very well with the Red Road male and are covering large areas through the reserve.
As always, the Lions of Tintswalo are in constant change and flux, as power dynamics shift and new blood arrives on the reserve. It’s important to remain up to date about who is who, so here’s the current breakdown of all the lions currently living near Tintswalo Safari Lodge.
Orpen pride: 2x males, between 4-6 females and cubs of about 5 months.
Male in pride is known as ‘Junior Nkuhuma’, originally from the northern Sabi sands and Southern Manyeleti where the Nkuhuma pride rule their territory.
Koppies pride with Red Road male 3 females, 1 young male of about 1.5 years old
Birmingham pride: 2-5 females, 2 young males of about 3 years old, pretty much independent now
Mbiri pride: 11 individuals plus Nharu young male, 4 females, 7 sub adults about 2 years old, 1 young Nharu male 3 years old
3 Avoca\Giraffe males Age about 10 years
Nharu Pride 11 - 3 females, 8 sub adults about 3 years old
Talamati pride 5 females
Avoca males 3 males about 5 years old
Nkuhuma pride Last time we saw them there were 11 animals
Torchwood pride Last time we saw them there were 10 animals
Its interesting that the Nharu sub adult male joined the Mbiri pride and then had a conflict with his own natal pride over the giraffe carcass. I wonder if he still remember his brothers, sisters and mothers from the Nharu pride and given the opportunity with the giraffe carcass, I wonder why he did not rejoin them.
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Birmingham White Lion Cub Update: the cubs have all been introduced to the rest of the Birmingham pride and are looking strong. The Ross male coalition have also been viewed with the cubs, suggesting that the male coalition have 'accepted' the youngsters. This means that the cubs will now benefit from the protection and security of the pride and coalition. A very encouraging development. This is a crucial moment for the cubs of the Birmingham pride for a few reasons. Firstly, if the dominant males did not accept the cubs as their own, they could have killed them. Male lions potentially do this as a measure to insure that their own bloodline is secured within a pride and territory. But the male coalition here seemingly have accepted the cubs as their own. This development now means that the youngsters will benefit from the security of the entire pride and the dominant male coalition (the Ross males). Secondly, it means that the pride can work together to provide food for each member of the pride and cubs, possibly increasing the chances of the cubs survival. The youngsters are not eating meat just yet, but this will be the next step for the new Birmingham pride members. Images by Lyle McCabe at Ngala, December 5, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author


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Australia Herekitty Offline
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White faced Giraffe male at Manyeleti Game Reserve. Image by Simone Paleari, December 5, 2018


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This male lion has weathered a storm. He is the last of trilogy coalition and known as Scar face. I wonder why. Majestic chap though. Darrel Camden-Smith at Thornybush, December 5, 2018

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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(12-05-2018, 11:01 PM)Peteporker Wrote: Its interesting that the Nharu sub adult male joined the Mbiri pride and then had a conflict with his own natal pride over the giraffe carcass. I wonder if he still remember his brothers, sisters and mothers from the Nharu pride and given the opportunity with the giraffe carcass, I wonder why he did not rejoin them.

Interesting indeed @Peteporker I wonder why he left in the first place, pressure within the Nharu hierarchy? I believe that most of the Nharu subadults are male. Or maybe he took off when the Avoca/Giraffes turned up and fled to the Mbiris. It seems like the Mbiris generally dominate the Nharu as there are four mature lionesses compared to three with the Nharu. It seems a lot of anomalous behavior has been recorded among the lions of Sabi Sands and Manyeleti in the last few years. Or maybe that's the norm and their behavior is just not that well understood.
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United States jordi6927 Offline
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(12-03-2018, 03:10 PM)Herekitty Wrote: @jordi6927 he's had the eye since he was a subadult and it's only gotten more opaque over time. He used have a brother who was dominant to him and maybe he picked up a scratch scrapping with him and it deteriorated from there. His brother disappeared like a lot of lions do in the Timbavati where a number of lions are permitted to be hunted each year. One of the Sumatra males went missing, the dominant giraffe male too. Excuse my french but it's a sad fucking state of affairs. Image by wildtrackersafaris, November 30, 2018

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I didnt know Timbavati allows hunting. Im assuming that is a privately owned reserve? Pretty sad shit
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Canada Pbonz Offline
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So the Ross males are the fathers of the white cub? 
Any predictions if they will be able to control that pride long enough for him to grow? I assume he’ll be hunted in the future because he’s so rare
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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The King walking through his jungle. Mapoza Male. Image by Johan Smalman at Shindzela, December 6, 2018


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India Raj8143 Offline
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(12-06-2018, 04:04 AM)Herekitty Wrote: White faced Giraffe male at Manyeleti Game Reserve. Image by Simone Paleari, December 5, 2018


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This male lion has weathered a storm. He is the last of trilogy coalition and known as Scar face. I wonder why. Majestic chap though. Darrel Camden-Smith at Thornybush, December 5, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

this is the male who killed matimba male right?
I DID EVERYTHING AS PER THE NATURE... STILL THEY CALL ME (SATAN) MR .T
history will remember them u like it or not...!!! the LEGENDARY MAPOGOS...
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(12-07-2018, 05:52 PM)Raj8143 Wrote: this is the male who killed matimba male right?

No.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Orpen male Junior at Tamboti Tented Cam. Image by danadatk December 8, 2018

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Mapoza male at Shindzela. Image by Nicolette Coan, November 27, 2018

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Machaton male at Balule. Image by briiannaj, December 5, 2018

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Youngest Giraffe male with Blackdam pride at Thornybush. Images by Cait Miers, December 8, 2018

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Trilogy male Scarface at Thornybush. Image by Darrel Camden-Smith, December 8, 2018

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Ross male with Birmingham female at Ngala. Image by Michelle Walsh-Hall, December 7, 2018

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Other Ross male with Birmingham cub. Image by Roan du Plessis at Ngala, December 6, 2018

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Birmingham white. Image by Ian Lombard at Ngala, December 8, 2018

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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Junior Nkuhuma is one hell of a majestic lion. Image by Emma Norris at Imbali, November 7, 2018


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Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: Yesterday, 01:09 AM by Herekitty )

Mapoza male. Image by Jacques Donaldson, November 25, 2018

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Ross male Fabio looking hungry, hanging with his Birmingham cubs. Images by YoungJi Hong at Ngala, December 9, 2018

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Giraffe male with Blackdam crew. Image by Lauren Jade Hill at Thornybush, December 9, 2018

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One of two so called Kruger males passing through, a very large male. Image by Wes Roos at Ingwela, December 10, 2018

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Machaton male showing good tolerance with his Kudelya cubs. Image by Pondoro Game Lodge.

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