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Leopards of Sabi Sands

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#31
( This post was last modified: 06-09-2015, 10:21 AM by GuateGojira )

@Jubatus, as you are very good finding good leopard pictures, could you search for a good side-view image of a male African leopard? I am going to make a comparison of South African and East African leopards, but I can't found a good image.

For advance, thanks.
 
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#32

 sure @GuateGojira
No problem Just give me a few house and I'll see what i cab find :-)
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 06-10-2015, 11:19 PM by Jubatus )

Hi @GuateGojira
Here is a few alternatives
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'
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Southern African Leopards



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 Eastern african leopard
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#34

Maxabeni male, also known as Makothini Male 3:3 in Londolozi.
He is one of the sons of the legendary Camp Pan male, and twin brother of the late Tu Tones/Newington male. He was born in October 2008 so he's 6 years old now, with an ever expanding territory. 
His has a characteristic brown nose and in his younger days it has been said, and I quote londolozi: "Strangely this male has been seen of more than one occasion with Buffalo calf kills as well as an Aardvark kill mid 2012."
A beautiful male, that is starting to look more and more like his father.

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Recently he had an altercation with a really young male, the Tortilis male who is around 2 years old I think. My guess is the Maxabeni was probably trying to kill the young male. He didn't succeed in doing it(although he did chase the young male off) and had some injuries to nurse because of that(Note the claw stuck in his nose and the swollen eye)..

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He is a really beautiful male, with a thick neck and everytime I see him more bulky and big.

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*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#35

Very interesting article, again from Londolozi, this time pertaining to individuals. One, the legendary Camp Pan male and the other, the newcomer, the Anderson male.

Are These The Biggest Leopards You’ve Ever Seen?

"Camp Pan male vs Anderson male.


This is a tough one, in that neither individual has been officially weighed, as far as I know, and we will never see them next to each other. We are probably going to have to go with our gut feelings.

One can often make incorrect assumptions or declarations when viewing animals in the wild, especially pertaining to the size of the animal, as a lot of factors come into play. Frame of reference, emotional attachment, spatial perspective and a host of others all affect one’s judgement, and at the end of the day, a definitive conclusion is still probably going to be hard to reach.

The Camp Pan and Anderson male leopards have never, as far as I know, come into contact with each other. The Camp Pan male was born about 15 years ago and, sadly, is probably now deceased, while the Anderson male is a relative youngster, being born in 2008.

While the Anderson male was resident in the north-central reaches of the Sabi Sands at a time when the Camp Pan male was holding territory in SE Londolozi, the two males were separated by not only distance but also by the buffer of other big males in between. The only time they could possibly have met up was when the Camp Pan male finally got pushed out of his territory by a combination of the Piva and Inyathini males and became nomadic. Having said this, once evicted the Camp Pan male did seem to confine most of his movements to the areas bordering the Sand River, skulking through the reedbeds and trying to remain as unobtrusive as possible. I doubt whether he moved far enough north that he would have encountered the Anderson male.

The Camp Pan male was a big leopard. Fact. He was immensely powerful, and I personally saw him with the hoisted carcasses of kudus, young wildebeest and juvenile zebras. Not small animals to carry up into the trees. His tracks were what really set him apart, however, and I doubt I will ever again see a leopard with feet that big. His “unmistakeable” tracks were, in fact, mistaken for those of a lioness on more than one occasion.

It seems, sadly, that the Camp Pan male has moved on to the happy hunting ground in the sky, but in his wake has come a new challenger for the title of “Biggest leopard on Londolozi”.


The Anderson male has started to show his hand after the disappearance of the Gowrie male, and rangers, trackers and guests alike are all being wowed by the sheer size of this enormous individual. They say that first impressions last, and one of the first things the Anderson male did when establishing territory on Londolozi was to hoist the carcass of a young giraffe. Yes, a giraffe! Giraffe foals are born weighing around 100kg, and I’m here to tell you that the Anderson male had not eaten much of the kill before carrying it into the branches of a long-tailed cassia. It was a truly outrageous display of strength.
Pic by James Tyrrell

*This image is copyright of its original author


Imagine picking up 200 pounds. Then imagine picking it up with your mouth. Then imagine climbing a tree with it! This will give you some idea of the incredible power-to-weight ratio of a large leopard like the Anderson male. Photograph by James Tyrrell

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Pic by James Tyrrell.

*This image is copyright of its original author


I remember when I first began working in the bush and a leopard was just a leopard. Male, female, young, old… my untrained eye struggled to tell the difference. Living in a leopard-rich environment has since given me the opportunity to build up a frame of reference when it comes to identifying and/or sizing individuals, and my first impression of the Anderson male – which remains – was that he is bigger than the Camp Pan male.


Many will shout me down here, Camp Pan loyalists in particular. But having seen the old campaigner many, many times over the years, and now suddenly coming face to face with the Anderson male, I am pretty convinced that should each of these giants of the leopard world have been weighed, the scales would have tipped in favour of the Anderson male…"

It was a great article that I enjoyed, I hope you like it too. The Anderson male is definetly leaving his mark there, and could very well become the next legend, like Camp Pan was.
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United States Pckts Online
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#36

I see no reason that a 90-100kg leopard (seems to be the max)
Couldn't hoist a slightly eaten giraffe carcass up a tree.

TFS
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#37
( This post was last modified: 11-17-2015, 07:17 PM by Tshokwane )

Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve:
Maxabeni was seen last night just after he killed a fully grown female waterbuck, and seen again this morning resting nearby.

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E.p Rangers:
Tingana and Shadow mating - Dawie Jacobs

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#38

Tingana and Kwatile female on November 13th! 


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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#39

Tingana looks to be doing Great lately!  Looking in shape, and mating With a lot of females.


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Tingana and Karula! 

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*This image is copyright of its original author
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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#40

Big guy Aistrip male has killed a big rock python on November 20th!  Awsome shot 


*This image is copyright of its original author
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India sanjay Offline
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#41

Wow thats awesome image
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#42
( This post was last modified: 11-24-2015, 06:28 PM by Tshokwane )

From the Londolozi Blog by Amy Attenborough:
I don’t watch reality television shows. In fact I don’t watch much television at all. But sometimes I wonder if this lack of interest is because I get my fix by watching Londolozi’s leopards every day, which is like our very own version of ‘reality TV’. Because we have spent decades documenting the births, deaths, relationships and interactions between these various leopards on Londolozi, we have intimate understandings of their lives. So when three leopards come together and we know each of their stories and how they fit together, the saga that unfolds is fascinating.

Three leopards are clearly visible in this picture together. While the two females have a stand off on the left hand side of the screen, the Piva male relaxes in the thicket in between mating sessions. Photograph by Kevin Power.

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The Xidulu female was mating with the Piva male but the problem was that she was doing this in the middle of the Tamboti female’s territory. This is not unusual for leopards. The female will try to mate with as many males as she can during her oestrus period in the hope that every male who has the chance of coming across her cubs, will think he is the father. The Xidulu female was therefore braving going into another female’s territory in order to protect her potential cubs.

The Piva male and Xidulu female mate while the Tamboti female keeps an eye on them from just a few meters away. Photograph by Kevin Power

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The Piva male snarls at the Xidulu female as they break apart after a mating session. This sort of aggression is very typical of mating leopards. Photograph by Kevin Power

*This image is copyright of its original author


This obviously greatly angered the Tamboti female who spent the afternoon watching the pair from varying distances. She would growl constantly, salivate heavily and sometimes even rush in at the pair. It was clear how agitated she was by this intruder’s presence.

The Tamboti female and Xidulu female meet face-to-face. You can see by their tucked back ears, drool at the mouth of the Tamboti female and their body posture that they are having a confrontation. Photograph by Kevin Power

*This image is copyright of its original author


At one point the females actually came face-to-face, both vocalising heavily and salivating but never actually physically engaging. It was in fact the Xidulu female who backed down, throwing herself in front of the Tamboti female in a submissive manner. Despite her much older age and experience, it seems she knew she was in the wrong by chancing into the Tamboti female’s territory and was doing her best to avoid a proper fight.

The Xidulu female clearly showing signs of submission as she throws herself at the feet of the Tamboti female. Photograph by Kevin Power

*This image is copyright of its original author


Despite many of these close encounters throughout the afternoon, the Piva male ended up inadvertently saving the day. He spotted movement in the bush quite a way off that piqued his interest and when he ran off to investigate, the Xidulu female followed close behind as is typical of females during the mating period. This dispelled the tension and left the Tamboti female alone, possibly making her feel that she was the victor of this particular battle and she allowed the pair to disappear.

The Piva male’s interest was piqued by movement in the bush that ended up being a hyena but as he ran to investigate, he dispelled tension by taking the Xidulu female with him. Photograph by Kevin Power

*This image is copyright of its original author


What is interesting is that the Tamboti female and Xidulu female are sisters, both born to the legendary Sunset Bend 2:2 female but six years apart. Do the females know that they are sisters and despite the Tamboti female’s drive to protect her territory did not engage in a fight because of their relationship? Or did they avoid full physical conflict only because any injury could spell death for either cat? The age gap between them is so large that chances are they are unaware of their genetic connection but of this we will never be sure. One thing we are sure of is that so many leopards together in one place provided for amazing game viewing and fulfilled our weekly fix in the latest episode of ‘Londolozi Leopards Reality TV Show’.



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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#43

Awsome post @Majingilane  tfs! 

Its almost weird to see the imense size differance between female and male leopards! 

Got another example here: 

Tingana and Shadow female mating 



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Norway Jubatus Offline
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#44


*This image is copyright of its original author

One of the undoubtebly biggest male Leopards in South Africa, Anderson. Anderson has grown to become on of the dominant males of Sabi Sands. He has a territory in Arathusa and Simbambili, and is looking to take over territory in the south west of Arathusa. 


*This image is copyright of its original author


Here he is again, looking as impressive as always, with Salayexe female, and their female cub.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#45

Umkumbe Safari Lodge:
Leopard activity in the Sabi Sand is at an all time high! During the course of the week, Mxabene came out to play. Mxabene displayed a huge amount of patience while waiting for his prey. He was clearly out for blood. These photos depict a perfectly poised leopard showing off his grand stature. Mxabene was actually maintaining his statuesque pose for quite some time – he was waiting for a warthog to come out of its burrow. The Mxabene sighting certainly has been a highlight of the week at Umkumbe Safari Lodge.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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