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In what groups we can divide the Bengal Tiger?

India Vinay Offline
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#16

I think Bengals broadly divided into two groups Sunderban and rest!  Lol


*This image is copyright of its original author


If you saw above figure you will notice most concentration of tigers in three regions Westersn Ghats,Central Indian Jungles and Himalayan foothills (Nepal and Bhutan tigers are not included in the above pic) 

So my guess is Four:

Terai region (Entire Himalayan foothills)

Central India

South India

and

Sunderban.
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India Rishi Offline
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#17
Smile  ( This post was last modified: 05-10-2017, 02:51 PM by Rishi )

Assumptions & opinions aside..how much CONCRETE INFORMATION do we have till  now on this topic..?? 
(I am producing all the info i have, with sources)
  • Tigers residing the high hills of Bhutan might or might not show any local adaptation, no studies done..only speculations.
  • Tigers of Sunderban are visibly different in size & stature..They also weigh less, with ever recorded max. being a megre 172kg. BUT were confirmed to be genetically similar to the central India population. ( http://indiasendangered.com/sundarban-ti...ral-india/ )
  • As far as the rest of India is concerned, it's more-or-less confirmed, that the Northernmost population (contagious to the rest until recent artificial segregation by expansion of Technosphere in India's northern plains) are of greater average size, that keeps reducing towards India's Southern tip. No data on genetic differences..yet.

*This image is copyright of its original author

PS: The "Western Indian Tiger Landscape" of Ranth (~60), Kuno(10+) & Sariska(20-25) populations have ALL tigers sourced from only a dozen cats...

https://bigcatrescue.org/wild-tigers-bec...oo-inbred/ )

http://www.ranthamborenationalpark.com/b...nthambore/ ) ..& thus, looks similar.
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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India parvez Offline
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#18

I think corbett tiges are different group based on certain facial phenotypic features. @Rishi The article says North east tigers are unique and it would be interesting to see if their genetic profile matches with that of Indo chinese tigers', it is not confirmed to be containing indochinese genes. But neverthless they are different group. Bhutan tigers resemble Indochinese tigers in some phenotypic features. They must be seperate group. Northeast group must be containing genes that have indochinese genes indeniously admixed to form completely different genotype. Central Indian and sunderban are seperate group as you said. I was certain from beginning that ranthambore tigers are inbred. Western ghat tigers must be seperate as they have nilgiri biosphere where genetic exchange occurs. Eastern ghat tigers must be one group. Tigers from kashmir must be containing some siberian or caspian genes from russia, afghanistan, china etc. Tigers across borders must be containing different genotypes. Considering caspian and siberian are similar groups, these tigers must have one genotype. But these are just opinions.
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India Rishi Offline
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#19
( This post was last modified: 05-10-2017, 08:07 PM by Rishi )

(05-09-2017, 09:28 PM)parvez Wrote: I think corbett tigers are different group based on certain facial phenotypic features. @Rishi The article says North east tigers are unique and it would be interesting to see if their genetic profile matches with that of Indo chinese tigers', @parvez it is not confirmed to be containing indochinese genes. But neverthless they are different group. Bhutan tigers resemble Indochinese tigers in some phenotypic features. They must be seperate group. Northeast group must be containing genes that have indochinese genes indeniously admixed to form completely different genotype. Central Indian and sunderban are seperate group as you said. I was certain from beginning that ranthambore tigers are inbred. Western ghat tigers must be seperate as they have nilgiri biosphere where genetic exchange occurs. Eastern ghat tigers must be one group. Tigers from kashmir must be containing some siberian or caspian genes from russia, afghanistan, china etc. Tigers across borders must be containing different genotypes. Considering caspian and siberian are similar groups, these tigers must have one genotype. But these are just opinions.

Valid point.. my original post edited.
&
Try not to put so many "must be"s........   Whistle
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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India parvez Offline
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#20

(05-10-2017, 02:48 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(05-09-2017, 09:28 PM)parvez Wrote: I think corbett tigers are different group based on certain facial phenotypic features. @Rishi The article says North east tigers are unique and it would be interesting to see if their genetic profile matches with that of Indo chinese tigers', @parvez it is not confirmed to be containing indochinese genes. But neverthless they are different group. Bhutan tigers resemble Indochinese tigers in some phenotypic features. They must be seperate group. Northeast group must be containing genes that have indochinese genes indeniously admixed to form completely different genotype. Central Indian and sunderban are seperate group as you said. I was certain from beginning that ranthambore tigers are inbred. Western ghat tigers must be seperate as they have nilgiri biosphere where genetic exchange occurs. Eastern ghat tigers must be one group. Tigers from kashmir must be containing some siberian or caspian genes from russia, afghanistan, china etc. Tigers across borders must be containing different genotypes. Considering caspian and siberian are similar groups, these tigers must have one genotype. But these are just opinions.

Valid point.. original edited.
&
Try not to put so many "must be"s........   Whistle

What do you mean? There is more scope of my points to be wrong? I am confused
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India Rishi Offline
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#21
( This post was last modified: 05-11-2017, 01:00 PM by Rishi )

@parvez On the contrary...
Yes indeed, intially i thought your analysis to be too farfetched with too many assumptions. However after i did some research, i found YOUR classification to be the closest to the one used by WII & NTCA!!!..
https://www.researchgate.net/figure/2926...s-in-India )

*This image is copyright of its original author

Can't say about genetic diversity... but these are the metapopulations considered for conservationmrelated purposes.
 
Also, read this...( http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article...ne.0174371 )
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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India parvez Offline
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#22

@Rishi Great information there. Thanks a lot. I too read the pdf articles and check for some important points only after which I come to conclusion on anything. My personal opinion surely must be atleast close to reality.
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India parvez Offline
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#23

Here I forgot to say philibit, rajaji, corbett tigers must be one group based on size. But corbett tigers seem to be different subgroup in it it has unique facial facial phenotypic features. Rest of terai must be one group. I feel Andhra tigers belong to one subgroup. Odisha tigers another subgroup based on size. So serious genetic research must be carried out to confirm all these.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#24
( This post was last modified: 09-14-2017, 07:10 PM by Ngala )

Hi to all.

I want to inform all our members and readers, that as wrote at the top of this thread, we thought to reorder few section, for avoid the fragmentation of information; in the tiger section, for now, regarding the Northern tigers that inhabit the land of TAL, the high mountains of Himalaya, and the alluvial plains of the Assam region. The aim is to group the tigers according to the latest scientific evidence, taking into account the genetics and the habitat. This results in create four specific threads: 

1 - Western Himalayan tigers (Terai Arc Landscape; Buxa tiger Reserve);
2 - Eastern Himalayan tigers (Sikkim, Bhutan, Arunachal Pradesh);
3 - North-Eastern Lowland tigers (Assam region);
4 - Chitwan tigers (seen the last studies, Chitwan tigers is genetically distinct than other northern populations). 

For make this, it’s necessary renamed some threads (or merging threads), and move some replies from a thread to another. The images and photos whitout location of capture, will be moved in other threads like “Unkown tigers" or "B2 and other great tigers from india”.

Ngala
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India parvez Offline
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#25

This is the ultimate information,

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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India Rishi Offline
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#26

Inbreeding to threaten Ranthambhore tigers in future
Dec 5, 2017, 06:35 AM | IST


*This image is copyright of its original author

JAIPUR: Tigers of Rajasthan are a unique lot. Due to their seclusion from the remaining population in the country, as the tigers in the intermediate forests have withered away, the tigers in Ranthambhore and Sariska Tiger reserves have become genetically isolated.
On top of that, poaching had reduced their numbers to a mere dozen twice.

Through this, the threat of inbreeding and thereby extermination of these felines from the state becomes a real one. A study conducted by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) and other agencies throws light in this regard, however, there appears to be a slight aberration as well.

Tigers in Rajasthan from the western most extant population of wild tigers. Historically, the range of these striped felines extended to northwest into Pakistan, but as population expand and the forested plains wee cleared for cultivation, they got locally extinct. Thus tigers in Ranthambhore and Sariska form the western most boundary.

The study says, “Our analyses reveal that tigers from the North-West cluster (Ranthambore) are genetically isolated. Such genetic isolation is supported by the fact that they form a distinct cluster in structure analysis and have the highest pair-wise with other genetic clusters.”
Furthermore, the study reveals that the tigers could be at high risk of extinction. “Data also suggest that genetic diversity in Ranthambore is much lower in comparison to all other genetic clusters, possibly due to small effective size and/or isolation. Low genetic variation contributes to higher extinction risk in wild populations. The results suggest that the Ranthambore population is isolated and that inbreeding depression is a realistic possibility in this population,” the study says about Ranthambhore tigers.

Logic dictates that when the gene pool shrinks, extinction of a specie become imminent. However there is a surprise hidden in Ranthambhore tigers too. They seem to be unperturbed, even through they are genetically isolated.


“They are separate from other individuals in the network analysis, even at low thresholds of genetic similarity,” the study reads. This means that even though Ranthambhore tigers are isolated, contrary to popular scientific belief, there is still a greater dissimilarity between tigers here.
“Tigers in Rajasthan have become unique and it is surprising that even after inbreeding no deficiency of any sort can be seen in these tigers. These tigers have adapted themselves to the arid zone and as the study reveals, are different from other tigers,” says Yadvendra Jhala of the WII.
Jhala further adds, “With genetic pool limitations come the threat of extinction but these tigers are surprisingly healthy. There is no malformation in them, yet.”
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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India parvez Offline
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#27
( This post was last modified: 01-11-2018, 09:10 PM by parvez )


*This image is copyright of its original author

http://210.212.84.122/download/status_ti...mpling.pdf
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India Rishi Offline
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#28
( This post was last modified: 02-14-2018, 10:26 PM by Rishi )

Owing to their vast & diverse range, tigers in India differ genetically from region to region. 
During a genetic analysis of existing tigers WII found that the genetic make-up of the tigers in Satkosia was similar to that of Madhya Pradesh tigers as compared to genetic make-up of tigers of even other parts of Odisha.
(Understandable, as it is best connected to central India through the Mahanadi river valley/gorge compared to rest of Odisha. For map see post #21.)


Exerpts from THIS article. It quotes WII professor Yadavendra Dev Jhala.

The ongoing fourth All India Tiger Estimation, 2018 will also provide more information to scientists on four “genetically unique” tiger populations that were spotted during the last estimation in 2014. “They were genetically very different and this estimation, which is done on a larger scale, will give us more information,” Jhala said.

These tiger “genetically unique” are in the North East (around 250), in southern India in the Palakkad tip (less than 50 tigers), in Simlipal National Park in Odisha (less than 30) and Valmiki National Park in Bihar (around 100), he said.
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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