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Hunting success

Finland Shadow Offline
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#1

Thread to share information about success rates of predators and also what kind of information can be found behind percentages. This thread is meant for terrestrial predators.

I start with observations and thoughts from Londolozi guide James Tyrrell. I found it interesting.

Quote: 
"Are Leopards Successful Hunters?

Most of what I’m about to type is purely anecdotal evidence.

It comes from years of game drives and walks in the field, but given that A) we only witness less than 10% of a leopard’s daily routine (and that’s as a Londolozi team, rather than for an individual ranger or tracker), and B) I’m not running any statistical analyses on my personal observations, none of this is gospel, it’s merely the initiation of what I consider to be an interesting conservation stream.

The established fact is that leopards don’t have a particularly high success rate in hunts. I’m sure the figure varies somewhat between areas, and maybe even between individual leopards, but as it’s roughly 20% – or maybe even less –  I’ll agree that they don’t score well in the hunt-conversion ratio. Certainly not when you compare them to Wild Dogs, which are up above 70% in their hunting success rate. Of course the dogs have a different hunting strategy and they operate as a pack, so it’s like comparing apples and oranges, but I’m merely giving an appreciation for where these solitary spotted cats sit."


*This image is copyright of its original author


Whole story and more photos:

https://blog.londolozi.com/2019/08/10/le...the-stalk/
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United States Styx38 Offline
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#2

@Shadow My reply is not exactly "Lion vs Cape Buffalo"

It is more "Carnivores vs. Bovines"

My main point was that Bovines are the most formidable opponents of any carnivore.

The Lion-Buffalo  relationship was just a better example.

You can see how an adult Forest Buffalo is too dangerous for a Leopard (excluding the elephant calf-buffalo size comparison).



Quote:Infact elephants may offer less risk of injury to the leopard than other prey of similar size (e.g. forest buffalo) (Ruggiero 1991a).

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249944124_Do_leopards_kill_forest_elephants_Evidence_from_northern_Congo



Not only are Wild Bovids dangerous, they have also killed different carnivores in different ecosystems.



 Grizzlies killed by Bison:

Quote:Young bison v. Grizzly sow 

A dead grizzly bear was found by a park ranger in the Lamar Valley. Her carcass was battered and covered in blood. Her ribs were broken and two large holes in her belly were probably made by the horns of a young bison. Many patches of blood and hair surrounding the carcass was found at the scene, as well as several bison footprints. The conclusion was that this bearwas killed in a fight with a bison.  


*This image is copyright of its original author
 

Source: To Save the Wild Bison: Life on the Edge in Yellowstone  



Bison bull v. Grizzly boar 

The witness of this fight stated that the bison bull would charge the bear to inflict gaping wounds with his sharp horns. The bear would attempt to seize the bull by the head or shoulders, but he was unsuccessful. After a decent skirmish, the male grizzly bear could endure no more and he tried to escape, but the bison bull pursued and killed him: 

 
*This image is copyright of its original author
 


*This image is copyright of its original author
 

Source: The Time of the Buffalo  

^ This was posted in another thread, but shows that a buffalo is too dangerous, and capable of killing a Grizzly Bear




Tiger  killed by Gaurs and Water Buffalos:

Quote:Jorhat, Nov. 11: A Royal Bengal tiger carcass was found inside the Kaziranga National Park today, just a day after the recovery of another carcass.

Park sources said guards spotted the carcass of an adult tigress inside thick bushes at Gerakati under Bagori range this morning. There were marks of severe injuries on the carcass, with the stomach pierced badly from an attack, possibly by another wild animal. Sources said the carcass did not seem very old and the animal might have been killed last night or at dawn.

Park authorities suspect that the big cat was killed in a fight with a buffalo as the guards spotted a herd of buffaloes very near to the carcass today.

Bagori ranger Deben Kalita said the tigress seemed to have died from fatal injuries received in the stomach.



Source: Tiger Carcass Found in Park


{2017} Fully grown male tiger possibly killed by a gaur 


The carcass of a four-year-old tiger was found in Madhya Pradesh’s Satpura reserve on Saturday, making it the 12th feline death in the state this year. 

The field staff spotted the carcass in the core of the reserve, Ashok Mishra, joint director Satpura Tiger Reserve told HT. 

The post mortem showed the tiger had suffered external and internal injuries. The tiger probably died after having a fight with another Gaur” he said. 



{2012} Tiger killed by gaur in the Nagarhole National Park 






*This image is copyright of its original author
 




Source  


These posts are to show how powerful wild bovines are.


This is why it is not surprising for a Leopard to usually avoid full grown Buffalo.
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Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-22-2019, 01:54 PM by Shadow )

(08-22-2019, 12:07 PM)Styx38 Wrote: @Shadow My reply is not exactly "Lion vs Cape Buffalo"

It is more "Carnivores vs. Bovines"

My main point was that Bovines are the most formidable opponents of any carnivore.

The Lion-Buffalo  relationship was just a better example.

You can see how an adult Forest Buffalo is too dangerous for a Leopard (excluding the elephant calf-buffalo size comparison).



Quote:Infact elephants may offer less risk of injury to the leopard than other prey of similar size (e.g. forest buffalo) (Ruggiero 1991a).

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249944124_Do_leopards_kill_forest_elephants_Evidence_from_northern_Congo



Not only are Wild Bovids dangerous, they have also killed different carnivores in different ecosystems.



 Grizzlies killed by Bison:

Quote:Young bison v. Grizzly sow 

A dead grizzly bear was found by a park ranger in the Lamar Valley. Her carcass was battered and covered in blood. Her ribs were broken and two large holes in her belly were probably made by the horns of a young bison. Many patches of blood and hair surrounding the carcass was found at the scene, as well as several bison footprints. The conclusion was that this bearwas killed in a fight with a bison.  


*This image is copyright of its original author
 

Source: To Save the Wild Bison: Life on the Edge in Yellowstone  



Bison bull v. Grizzly boar 

The witness of this fight stated that the bison bull would charge the bear to inflict gaping wounds with his sharp horns. The bear would attempt to seize the bull by the head or shoulders, but he was unsuccessful. After a decent skirmish, the male grizzly bear could endure no more and he tried to escape, but the bison bull pursued and killed him: 

 
*This image is copyright of its original author
 


*This image is copyright of its original author
 

Source: The Time of the Buffalo  

^ This was posted in another thread, but shows that a buffalo is too dangerous, and capable of killing a Grizzly Bear




Tiger  killed by Gaurs and Water Buffalos:

Quote:Jorhat, Nov. 11: A Royal Bengal tiger carcass was found inside the Kaziranga National Park today, just a day after the recovery of another carcass.

Park sources said guards spotted the carcass of an adult tigress inside thick bushes at Gerakati under Bagori range this morning. There were marks of severe injuries on the carcass, with the stomach pierced badly from an attack, possibly by another wild animal. Sources said the carcass did not seem very old and the animal might have been killed last night or at dawn.

Park authorities suspect that the big cat was killed in a fight with a buffalo as the guards spotted a herd of buffaloes very near to the carcass today.

Bagori ranger Deben Kalita said the tigress seemed to have died from fatal injuries received in the stomach.



Source: Tiger Carcass Found in Park


{2017} Fully grown male tiger possibly killed by a gaur 


The carcass of a four-year-old tiger was found in Madhya Pradesh’s Satpura reserve on Saturday, making it the 12th feline death in the state this year. 

The field staff spotted the carcass in the core of the reserve, Ashok Mishra, joint director Satpura Tiger Reserve told HT. 

The post mortem showed the tiger had suffered external and internal injuries. The tiger probably died after having a fight with another Gaur” he said. 



{2012} Tiger killed by gaur in the Nagarhole National Park 






*This image is copyright of its original author
 




Source  


These posts are to show how powerful wild bovines are.


This is why it is not surprising for a Leopard to usually avoid full grown Buffalo.

It is one thing to say, that some prey is more difficult than other. Then another thing to say, that it would be too much. Predators take down all kind of prey and sometimes also the most dangerous there is. Of course when talking about gorillas, silverbacks aren´t the ones normally attacked. When talking about forest buffalos, calves and cows are preferred without a doubt. 

Still time to time we are lucky to see individuals, which show to us that "impossible" is possible. But that is well known thing, that life of the leopard, tiger, lion etc. isn´t easy and many pay heavy price for inexperience, bad luck etc. Still as many videos show, these predators make time to time high risk hunts. Sometimes succeeding, often prey is able to fight/flee and in some cases hunter is badly injured or die. That´s life for these animals. My point was just, that even though some animals are difficult to take down, that doesn´t mean same as impossible/off limits. One good thing to remember too is, that most hunts happen in darkness, giving better chance for hunter to get close to prey unnoticed. We see in videos only a fraction and in circumstances which are most difficult especially, when thinking about hunting alone.
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Finland Shadow Offline
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#4

@Styx38 I moved these latest postings from rainforest leopard thread here just in case, that there is more about different species and how easy or difficult some animals are to kill.
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