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Great One-Horned Rhinocerous (Rhinocerous unicornis)

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@parvez :

about #105: I considered them as equal in length and weight. But according to wiipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinoceros

" The Indian rhinoceros, or greater one-horned rhinoceros, (Rhinoceros unicornis) has a single horn 20 to 60 cm long.[18] It is nearly as large as the African white rhino. Its thick, silver-brown skin folds into the shoulder, back, and rump, giving it an armored appearance. Its upper legs and shoulders are covered in wart-like bumps, and it has very little body hair. Grown males are larger than females in the wild, weighing from 2,500–3,200 kg (5,500–7,100 lb). Shoulder height is 1.75–2.0 m (5.7–6.6 ft). Females weigh about 1,900 kg (4,200 lb) and are 3–4 m (9.8–13 ft) long. The record-sized specimen was approximately 4,000 kg (8,800 lb).[19]  "
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India parvez Offline
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@Spalea yeah I have seen it. But still doubt if they weighed the largest specimens of both subspecies. White rhino seems to be slightly longer whereas indian rhino seems to be wide and heavy and robust.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@parvez :

Yes... Perhaps they use 2 differents ways for measuring their biggest individuals, from one continent (Africa) to the other one (Asian) Wink .

I considered them as equal, then as you did I found that the Indian rhino was rather massive (mainly because of its skin) wherewas the white rhino's horns impressed me much more.
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India parvez Offline
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@Spalea i agree their horns are almost twice to that of indian rhino. But even though the skin makes them appear more massive i am sure at equal measurements of length and height they are heavier than white rhino.
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India Sanju Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author

Source: By WikipedianProlific [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
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Satya Sinha Pavitri Female rhino translocated from Pobitora WLS, Assam to Dudhwa NP in 1984
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Rishi Online
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The tiny Pobitora sanctuary has longest Indian rhino horns. Maybe because it's got their highest density & probably toughest competition.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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India Ashutosh Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-01-2019, 01:39 PM by Ashutosh )

Kaziranga after a century of fantastic conservation has the same problem as Gir (also a conservation story of a century). Kaziranga in 1905 had 18 Rhinos, Gir in 1912 had 15 Asiatic lions. Today, both these landscapes have reached their carrying capacities with Kaziranga now home to 2500+ Rhinos. Both have been great conservation stories and should inspire Indians to conserve more endangered wildlife. Should definitely congratulate the Assamese govt and the people for this success story.

But, there is going to be an imminent decision to be made about what to do with the Rhinos as their numbers continue to grow. Personally, I think we should be looking at the few sanctuaries nearby like Manas, Pobitora, Orang and see if they could accommodate a few. But, these parks have a rising population themselves as well. I am not sure how long ago rhinos lived in Corbett-Rajaji and the likes in the Terai arc, but, they will need to find a new place for them.
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India Rishi Online
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( This post was last modified: 11-28-2019, 09:10 AM by Rishi )

(05-16-2017, 08:55 PM)Shardul Wrote: Hi @$uSpiciou$ 

I have always wondered how Corbett is able to support 200+ tigers when it is about the same size as kanha and the only large prey there is Sambar? Could you shed some light on that? Also, why don't they try to introduce large bovines like buffalo and gaur, or even rhino? The dhikala grasslands should be able to support a large number of them.
(05-17-2017, 01:00 PM)SuSpicious Wrote: Could you shed some light on that? Also, why don't they try to introduce large bovines like buffalo and gaur, or even rhino? The dhikala grasslands should be able to support a large number of them. - Rishi is right on the money again with this.  translocating tigers from Corbett to Rajaji ( both parks are in Uttrakhand State) is proving to be such a daunting task and has face so much criticism. Here to introduce fauna that hasn't been there for a long time is simply another thing. Yes the grassland can support everything but the laws are too strict plus the Forest department in no way take such a huge risk when already Corbett is struglling with a huge problem of forest cover loss and poaching.

Uttarakhand plans to reintroduce rhinos at Corbett
According to wildlife experts, sighting of a male rhino near Kotdwara in Pauri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand in 1789 was last confirmed evidence that rhinoceros have existed in the Himalayan state in the past.
Nov 27, 2019 


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The Uttarakhand wildlife advisory board on Tuesday approved a proposal for the reintroduction of rhinoceros on an experimental basis in Corbett Tiger Reserve, emphasising that the geographical terrain and environmental conditions were suitable for the species, said Rajiv Bhartari, chief wildlife warden Uttarakhand.
The proposal was approved in the 14th meeting of the state wildlife board held in Dehradun under the chairmanship of chief minister Trivendra Singh Rawat, said Bhartari.

According to wildlife experts, sighting of a male rhino near Kotdwara in Pauri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand in 1789 confirms that rhinoceros have existed in the Himalayan state in the past.
Introduction of rhinoceros in Corbett will also boost wildlife tourism in the state.

Scientist at Wildlife Institute of India (WII) Dehradun, Qamar Qureshi, had recommended the reintroduction of rhinos in Corbett Tiger Reserve in 2007. He said that they had studied Uttarakhand’s protected forest areas where the rhinos could be introduced.
He further said that they found out that 3 areas were primarily suitable for the reintroduction of rhinos. The first one being Corbett and the next being Surai Range of Terai East Forest Division on the southeastern end of Uttarakhand and the last, Paterpani on the south of Dhikala grassland. With good floral diversity and more protected forest cover, Corbett is best suited as a place for the reintroduction of the species.

Qureshi said there have been two major reintroductions of rhinoceros species till now in the country. “1st was into Dudhwa National Park of Uttar Pradesh in 1984, which has been very successful. The rhinoceros were brought there from Nepal’s Chitwan and Assam’s Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary. 2nd was reintroduction of rhinoceros in Manas National Park of Assam where their population had come to end due to insurgent activities,” he said.

Referring to this development, the Uttarakhand Chief Wildlife Warden stated that the one-horned species will either be brought from West Bengal or Assam as the maximum population of this species are there. However, before doing that, a proposal will also be sent to the Union Environment Ministry regarding the translocation.

Sources:
https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/...N_amp.html
https://www.financialexpress.com/lifesty...6701/lite/
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/trav...258055.cms
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India Rishi Online
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10 rhinos will be brought to Corbett Tiger Reserve in the first phase and subsequently, 10 more would be added.
*This image is copyright of its original author
State Chief Wildlife Warden Rajiv Bhartari said that a proposal will be sent to the Cente soon in this regard to transport rhinos from either Assam or West Bengal or both.

The Uttarakhand State Wildlife Board has cleared the proposal by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) to introduce rhinoceroses in the Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) to boost tourism & revive the habitat of species that survive on low-height grass.

Geographical terrain and environmental conditions in CTR are suitable for rhinos. The ideal sites chosen in Corbett are valley habitats bounded on either side by the lower Himalayas (north), Shivalik Hills (south) and the Ramganga Reservoir (east), which would also act as natural barriers to rhino movement outside these area.
Each of the founding population animals would be fitted with a GPS radio-collar. A team of researchers would be allocated for monitoring their ranging patterns, foraging habits, demography and habitat use.

https://indianexpress.com/article/india/...5867/lite/
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(12-23-2019, 09:42 AM)Rishi Wrote: 10 rhinos will be brought to Corbett Tiger Reserve in the first phase and subsequently, 10 more would be added.
*This image is copyright of its original author
State Chief Wildlife Warden Rajiv Bhartari said that a proposal will be sent to the Cente soon in this regard to transport rhinos from either Assam or West Bengal or both.

The Uttarakhand State Wildlife Board has cleared the proposal by the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) to introduce rhinoceroses in the Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) to boost tourism & revive the habitat of species that survive on low-height grass.

Geographical terrain and environmental conditions in CTR are suitable for rhinos. The ideal sites chosen in Corbett are valley habitats bounded on either side by the lower Himalayas (north), Shivalik Hills (south) and the Ramganga Reservoir (east), which would also act as natural barriers to rhino movement outside these area.
Each of the founding population animals would be fitted with a GPS radio-collar. A team of researchers would be allocated for monitoring their ranging patterns, foraging habits, demography and habitat use.

https://indianexpress.com/article/india/...5867/lite/

Great news
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India Ashutosh Offline
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@Rishi, you should make a new thread on this topic with updates coming in as they do.
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India Rishi Online
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( This post was last modified: 12-23-2019, 08:40 PM by Rishi )

(12-23-2019, 07:08 PM)Ashutosh Wrote: @Rishi, you should make a new thread on this topic with updates coming in as they do.
Not much to update here. There is already a thread called Reintroduction & Rewilding. Could cover it there, but it's only going to be 2-3 posts more, including the planned Pilibhit rhino reintroduction.
After that only status update years later.
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