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Great One-Horned Rhinocerous (Rhinocerous unicornis)

Finland Shadow Offline
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#91
( This post was last modified: 01-14-2019, 11:41 PM by Shadow )

One older but still interesting documentary about rhinos and Kaziranga. Many other animals can be seen too. At 9:19 rhino rolls in water, that surprised me. 9:44 rear engine is started, but ship is just too big.




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United States Pckts Offline
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#92

(01-14-2019, 04:15 PM)Jimmy Wrote:
(01-14-2019, 02:18 PM)Shadow Wrote: Documentary about rhinos in Kaziranga, this is all about rhinos there.




One of the places I would like to visit in lifetime, remarkable little place Kaziranga. It seems some rhinos if it gets annoyed by constantly being followed can charge elephants too, primary mode of safari in Kaziranga. Opens it's mouth and just keeps coming.watch




About half the size of Kanha but I've heard that tourists have access to less than 4% of the park it self, between that and the tall elephant grass, it really is a mysterious land.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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#93
( This post was last modified: 01-15-2019, 12:44 PM by Jimmy )

This video let's you gauge the size of these Giants



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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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#94

so, there are two threads on the same topic i think newer one is by @Shadow so both could be merged @Rishi there are already more infos/pics here in this thread.
Found this nice informative video: also a good look at their normally hidden incisors.



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Finland Shadow Offline
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#95
( This post was last modified: 01-18-2019, 01:43 PM by Shadow )

(01-18-2019, 01:30 PM)Jimmy Wrote: so, there are two threads on the same topic i think newer one is by @Shadow so both could be merged @Rishi there are already more infos/pics here in this thread.
Found this nice informative video: also a good look at their normally hidden incisors.




And I even tried to look and search if there was something about rhinos... :) I think, that same with elephants. I tried to search but no results and then later something...
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#96

(01-18-2019, 01:30 PM)Jimmy Wrote: so, there are two threads on the same topic i think newer one is by @Shadow so both could be merged @Rishi there are already more infos/pics here in this thread.
Found this nice informative video: also a good look at their normally hidden incisors.




@Jimmy
Very good video and information they have huge teeth and they can inflict a lot of damage with them
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India Rishi Offline
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#97

(01-14-2019, 06:12 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-14-2019, 04:15 PM)Jimmy Wrote: One of the places I would like to visit in lifetime, remarkable little place Kaziranga. It seems some rhinos if it gets annoyed by constantly being followed can charge elephants too, primary mode of safari in Kaziranga. Opens it's mouth and just keeps coming.watch




It would be interesting to know, what elephant thinks in that kind of situation. I mean so many people on back of it, then that big opponent charging. Does it try to avoid dropping people in some way or is it totally in "survival mode" :) Of course it has to move in some way, it can´t just stand still. Well, looks like that no-one got hurt too badly.

Standing still is exactly what is trained to do. 

The rhino reacts by stopping and/or veering away to a side... Every. Single. Time.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Finland Shadow Offline
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#98

(01-21-2019, 11:22 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(01-14-2019, 06:12 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-14-2019, 04:15 PM)Jimmy Wrote: One of the places I would like to visit in lifetime, remarkable little place Kaziranga. It seems some rhinos if it gets annoyed by constantly being followed can charge elephants too, primary mode of safari in Kaziranga. Opens it's mouth and just keeps coming.watch




It would be interesting to know, what elephant thinks in that kind of situation. I mean so many people on back of it, then that big opponent charging. Does it try to avoid dropping people in some way or is it totally in "survival mode" :) Of course it has to move in some way, it can´t just stand still. Well, looks like that no-one got hurt too badly.

Standing still is exactly what is trained to do. 

The rhino reacts by stopping and/or veering away to a side... Every. Single. Time.
Ok, that was interesting to hear. I have this image of rhinos attacking cars from documentaries. But of course car is car and also all of those documentaries have been about African rhinos :)

Like this one here. But actually I don´t remember anything similar what comes to elephants even from Africa now when trying to remember.




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Canada Wolverine Offline
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#99

"Natural History of Mammalia of India and Ceylon" by Robert Sterndale, 1884


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


And a bit about Javan rhino, at those times inhabiting Sunderbans


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-22-2019, 08:27 PM by Jimmy )

While we are comparing between rhinos, i have come to notice that in Sumatran rhinos the keratin (the hard matter from which it's horn are made of) seems to extends beyond it's horn and covers it's upper nostrils as well as one huge block, clearly due to this hard covering, it's front facial structure looks more rigid and nostrils doesnot flare "visibly" like in other rhinos... !! Some infos on Sumatran rhinos:-



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United States Pckts Offline
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Rhinos having a scrap



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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India Sanju Offline
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http://www.theshillongtimes.com/2019/02/...away-horn/

First Rhino to become victim to Poaching this year. RIP
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
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@Rishi  Fantastic 

West Bengal’s rhino population hits a record high
  • A census carried out in February in India’s West Bengal state counted 231 rhinos in Jaldapara National Park and 52 in Gorumara National Park, up from 204 and 49, respectively, in 2015.
  • Both figures are the highest recorded since authorities began taking official rhino counts in the 1920s.
  • While encouraged by the rising rhino numbers, conservationists have raised concerns about the skewed sex ratios in both parks, a scarcity of grazing land, and the ever-present threat of poaching.
Rhino populations in India’s Jaldapara and Gorumara national parks, in the state of West Bengal, have hit their highest levels in a century, according to preliminary figures from a recent census.

Following February censuses in these two parks, researchers put the current population of greater one-horned rhinos (Rhinoceros unicornis) at 231 to 237 animals in Jaldapara, up from 204 in the previous census in 2015. In nearby Gorumara, 52 rhinos were counted, up from 49 in the 2015 census.

Conservationists have welcomed the confirmation that rhino numbers are rising, but voiced concerns about the sex ratios in both parks, the size and quality of grasslands available to the animals, and the ongoing threat of poaching.

*This image is copyright of its original author
A greater-one horned rhino in Jaldapara National Park, which is now home to at least 231 of the animals, according to the 2019 census. Image by Debabrata Bardhan via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).

Head count
The census in Jaldapara was carried out on Feb. 15 and 16, and involved more than 300 park staffers and NGO members, as well as 53 elephants that some of the observers rode on to cover the entire 217-square-kilometer (84-square-mile) park, says Manish Yadav, assistant wildlife warden at Jaldapara National Park. In addition, observers were placed at the boundaries of the park to report any animals that might be moving between ranges.

Altogether, 231 rhinos were directly sighted in Jaldapara, including  97 males (68 adults, 23 sub-adults and six calves), 91 females (56 adults, 27 sub-adults, eight calves), and 43 whose sex could not be identified, Yadav says. (A total of 237 rhinos were actually counted, but officials believe that six rhinos may have been counted twice).

The census in Gorumara National Park (80 square kilometers, or 31 square miles), along with the adjacent Chapramari Wildlife Sanctuary (9 square kilometers, 3.5 square miles) and reserve forest areas of Jalpaiguri, was held on Feb. 12 and 13.

Nisha Goswami, the divisional forest officer at Gorumara, says the rhino population there includes 25 males (18 adults, four sub-adults, three calves), 17 females (15 adults, two sub-adults) and 10 of unidentified sex.

In addition to the manual count, teams from WWF and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) collected samples of rhino dung, which will be used to help build a database of individual rhinos’ genetic signatures, part of the global Rhino DNA Indexing System, or RhoDIS program. “Under this system, we collect as many individual rhinos’ DNA from the wild, including poaching cases, to generate a database,” says Samrat Mondol, a scientist at WII whose team runs the project in India. “This database is then used to match seized rhino contraband, and provide extremely strong scientific evidence in the court of law against the offenders.”

Mondol says eight poaching cases have been successfully prosecuted in court since the project was launched in India more than a year ago.

*This image is copyright of its original author
Wallowing rhinos in Jaldapara National Park. The semiaquatic animals spend much of their lives in and around water. Image by A. J. T. Johnsingh, WWF-India and NCF via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).

Record highs, but some concerns
In both parks, the current population figures are now highest since officials began keeping records a century ago.
In 1920, Jaldapara had 200 rhinos. By 1986, it had plummeted to just 14. Gorumara had around 12 rhinos in 1920, with the population dwindling to just eight in 1986.

However, concerns remain. The number of male rhinos equals or exceeds that of females in both parks, a pattern also observed in the 2015 census. To minimize conflict and maximize population growth, experts say the ideal sex ratio is closer to one male per three females. “It is really a matter of concern as more males are getting born, which has resulted in increase in the straying of animals, infighting among them leading to deaths,” says Raju Sarkar, assistant divisional forest officer at Gorumara. “But it is nature and we are helpless.”

The growing population has also raised concerns among forest officials, who fear that the limited size of available grasslands means ensuring enough food for these herbivores might soon become a challenge. In addition to rhinos, both parks have sizable populations of Indian bison and several species of deer, which generally remain uncounted and which also rely on the grasslands for food.
“The grasslands is a natural phenomenon caused by floods, but increasing human intervention by the construction of dams and embankments have reduced the scale of floods in the past few years,” says Kumar Vimal, the Jaldapara divisional forest officer. “The western bank of the park had turned completely dry before the embankments were broken a few years ago.”

There are about 120 square kilometers (46 square miles) of “pristine” grasslands in the park, and officials clear another 3 to 3.5 square kilometers (1.1 to 1.4 square miles) each year, he says. “But artificial grasslands are susceptible to weed infestation. We have to realize that floods are not always the bane but also boon for living creatures.”

Gorumara faces the same problem. The park has about 10 square kilometers (3.9 square miles) of grassland, with 1 square kilometer being renewed each year.

“The increase of population is certainly a positive step and the numbers are going to rise further if poaching is controlled,” says Bibhab Kumar Talukdar, Asia coordinator of the International Rhino Foundation. “The state government should now focus on grassland management as both the parks still have the capacity to hold 40-50 more rhinos.”
Poaching remains a threat in both parks, especially as stricter enforcement in neighboring Assam state’s Kaziranga National Park, home to the country’s largest rhino population, pushes poachers elsewhere.

Eight rhinos were killed by poachers in Jaldapara since the 2015 census, officials say. In Gorumara, at least two rhinos are believed to have been killed for their horns in the same period.
Still, with the number of rhinos increasing, conservationists in West Bengal have reason for optimism. To provide grazing grounds and balance the sex ratio of the state’s growing rhino population, plans are afoot to develop a new habitat for the species in a forest reserve in Patlakhawa, around 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) south of Jaldapara.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India parvez Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-11-2019, 08:13 AM by Rishi )



Look at the chest girth though it is fully gorged.
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India parvez Offline
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Impressive specimens,
I doubt they are smaller than African white rhino. They are too wide and heavy. 

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
Wisdom of third eye
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