There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Giraffes (Giraffa sp.)

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#16

Thomas Vilayan: " Mara scape! "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#17

" Throwback of a tower of giraffes "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#18

David Lloyd: " A Twiga Gallery of Ten: 2010-2020. Because everyone likes Twigas * "





*Twiga = giraffe in swahili language.
2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#19

Beverly Joubert: " Standing tall. When posing on an open Kenyan plain - in their typically regal stature – giraffes are the embodiment of elegance and poise. But make no mistake, if two males disagree they quickly abandon their composure and swing their heads at one another’s necks in attempts to bludgeon their way to dominance. Many of these “necking” rituals are low-grade affairs – an opportunity for the giraffes to size up their rivals by leaning and pushing against one another. Full-scale sparring is a more dramatic event. Bulls brace their legs and use their upper bodies like sledgehammers, throwing their heads in wide-reaching sweeps. In some instances, the loser may be knocked out cold.⁣

Fortunately, there’ll be no head-swinging for this mating pair – just a lot of lofty showing off, almost as if they know they are a head and neck above everything else!⁣ "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#20





Paultje_ni: " Portrait of a giraffe with Red ‐ Billed Oxpeckers. One of the most iconic animals in Africa. When you see these magnificent creatures for the first time in their natural habitat, you know you’ve arrived. "

2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#21

David Lloyd: " Maasai Towers. Maasai Mara 2019 "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#22

Cyril Rony Joseph: " La vida salvaje es cautivante, intrigante inesperada. Puede suceder en cualquier momento algo sorprendente. Y captar ese momento es un privilegio. Si disfrutaste la toma regálame un comentario.⁠ "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#23

Wim van des Heever: " Giraffe Circles ???

Those perfect Etosha evenings ..!
Just love working with reflections ? "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#24

Harman Singh Heer: " There are fewer giraffes than elephants remaining in the wild, with only 111,000 individuals left. Save the giraffes this #WorldGiraffeDay by supporting @giraffe_conservation. Which photo is your favourite? "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#25




Lucien Beaumont: " Giraffe will often only drink every three days or so.

This is due to giraffe being vulnerable to predator attack, especially during the dry season, when lions, their main predator, will lie in wait around waterholes, knowing full well that their prey will be forced to drink.
It is also incredibly awkward for the worlds tallest animal to almost fold itself in half and bring its mouth to take a few sips of water.
With the adaptation of being the tallest animal, giraffe have incredibly high blood pressure to enable blood to be pumped from the heart to the head, up to 6m above the ground.
When a giraffe finally builds up enough courage to take a drink, there is another conundrum.
As soon as the giraffe brings its head below its shoulders, blood, under the high pressure, rushes towards the brain.
The giraffe has a network of blood vessels below the brain which act as a sponge to reduce the pressure and prevent the giraffe from blacking out, but this “blood sponge” only reduces the pressure for a few seconds, allowing the giraffe only moments to take vital sips of water before the blood pressure mounts and the giraffe has to quickly raise its head above its heart.
An impressive spray of water and saliva is often whipped into the air as the head and neck of the giraffe return to their vertical position.
Next time you see a giraffe making its way to a waterhole to drink, remind yourself of how easy we have as humans it to simply pour ourselves a glass of water. "

2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#26

Daniel Rosengren: " A giraffe grazing on an Umbrella Thorn tree. The light during the Serengeti sunsets is a dream for a photographer.

Did you know that giraffes have an up to 45 centimeter long tongue that they use to grab and pull leaves off the thorny branches. The part of the tongue that can reach outside the mouth is almost black while the inner part of it is a normal pink. The black colour is believed to protect the tongue from sunburn since it spends so much time outside the mouth.
Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. "


2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#27

Richard De Gouveia: " Two male giraffe have fight for dominance in a display called necking. These massive creatures use their heads as battering rams sound by their long necks and the blows landed emit a dull thumping thud. They try to knock the other giraffe off their feet and these fights can sometime end in death.⁠⠀ "






2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB