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Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines

United States tigerluver Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-06-2018, 09:52 AM by tigerluver )

@Smilodon-Rex , you mention a giant (Amphi)machairodus giganteus skull. I have read of a skull of the species being referred to as giant but do not recall it being 460 mm. Here is a link to the 415 mm skull I refer to. Would you have the source to share?
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(07-06-2018, 09:36 AM)tigerluver Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex , you mention a giant (Amphi)machairodus giganteus skull. I have read of a skull of the species being referred to as giant but do not recall it being 460 mm. Here is a link to the 415 mm skull I refer to. Would you have the source to share?

The 460 MM skull is a private collection, I will share pictures with you
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(07-06-2018, 09:36 AM)tigerluver Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex , you mention a giant (Amphi)machairodus giganteus skull. I have read of a skull of the species being referred to as giant but do not recall it being 460 mm. Here is a link to the 415 mm skull I refer to. Would you have the source to share?


*This image is copyright of its original author

 The 460 mm machairodus giganteus skull,but I have no link about this specimen. BTW, In HeZheng China, many 400 MM level machirodus giganteus skull are existed in private collection. If you are interested in, you could buy one of them to do research
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Indonesia P.T.Sondaica Offline
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(05-24-2018, 05:06 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Maybe a difference in the carnivora guild between the Americas kept S. fatalis smaller from the start? Or perhaps some type of social structure?

Panthera atrox probably arrived onto the Americas as massive as it was from the start because it was closely related to or simply an offshoot of P. fossilis. Considering the disappearance date of P. fossilis and relationship to P. atrox, P. atrox probably arrived onto America much earlier than fossil record shows. Thus, the S. fatalis and P. atrox interactions and thus evolutionary forces they had on each other probably started earlier too. 

Considering how the fossils recorded are rather recent, perhaps P. atrox being giant it was from its appearance inhibited S. fatalis slow progression to a larger size like its cousin in the south and thus by the end of its time, S. fatalis found it better to stop increasing in size and let P. atrox have the superpredator niche.

Simolodon populator just 250-360 kg
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*This image is copyright of its original author

Different big cats in Ice Age North America
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(05-20-2018, 09:55 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: Since Smilodon fatalis and Smilodon populator were likely derived from the more primitive Smilodon gracilis, and ironically both species had predated Panthera atrox in the history of America.

But why Smilodon fatalis just let the newly arrived Panthera atrox seized the niche position as the top predator in its domain, while Smilodon populator remained occupying that position?

Maybe fatalis was positioned to be the second fiddle, while populator chose to evolve as the apex predator?

Compared with Short-face bears, Grizzly bears  may have more conflicts with American lions, because their adaptations are better and their aggressives may stronger.In Pleistocene, Grizzly bears were bigger than today and their bodysizes were equivalent to modern kodiak bears.
When Grizzly bears met American lions, they may had to conflict frequently. At the final stage of Pleistocene, lots of the herds of herbivores began moving from south to north in today USA and Canada, then the carnivores which contain American lions following too, at the same time, Grizzly bears were moving from north to south, thus led to the conflicts between Grizzly bears and American lions were frequent. BTW, human beings were also went deep into New mainland too,all of these  let American lions faced higher risk of competition and survival in no doubt.
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