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Extinct Ancestors of Modern Animals

Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#31

A probable ancestor of modern crocs eating an other probable ancestor of modern sharks...

Christian Reno: " A Megalodon washed ashore on the coast of Venezuela,atracting some bird and crocodilians including the gigantic caiman,Purussaurus "



paleoart by : @lacerda.julio
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#32

Christian Reno: " Two Dinocrocuta brings down Hipparion "



Dinocrocuta: hyena ancestor.

Hipparion: horse ancestor.
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Balam Offline
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#33

(05-14-2020, 01:35 AM)Spalea Wrote: Christian Reno: " Two Dinocrocuta brings down Hipparion "



Dinocrocuta: hyena ancestor.

Hipparion: horse ancestor.

I wouldn't call them ancestors but rather extinct relatives, as they weren't actually the species that lead to their modern relatives. Hipparion are a completely different genus of equids and dinocrocuta wasn't part of the hyena family.
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#34

" A mother mastodon charges against arctodus simus(giant short faced-bear) to protect her calf "





" paleoart by : @hodarinundu "
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#35

J Monesi the largest rodent to have lived compared to modern day Capybara
Credit to LizDonguri Capaldi

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#36

Huge prehistoric Baboon Dinopithecus
Credit to prehistoric creatures

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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#37

" Medium and large mammals (5 kg or more) of Miami, Florida 15-10,800 years ago!

Artwork by Gabriel N. Ugueto

Some of these massive beasts are familiar in form but enormous in size, while others are strange hybrids of modern-day animals.
Megafauna are simply big animals. Elephants are megafauna, as are giraffes, whales, cows, deer, tigers, and even humans. Megafauna can be found on every continent and in every country.
For every living species of megafauna, there are a large number of extinct megafauna. In the age before widespread settlement, without the pressures of human interference, animals were free to evolve into some truly awe-inspiring forms. Imagine beavers the size of bears or wild pigs larger than modern-day rhinoceroses, or even sloths as large as elephants.
Humans can be blamed for pushing many of the most recently extinct megafauna to their limits. It's generally agreed that the populations of many large animals plummeted in the first thousand years or so after humans hit a continent. Our earliest ancestors would, quite reasonably, have gone after the biggest animals they could to feed their families and kill the biggest predators to cut down on competition and attacks. Mix in human ingenuity, climatic changes, and hundreds and thousands of years and you soon get a land denuded of megafauna. "


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#38

" Diplocaulus magnicornis ?

Artwork by Liam Elward
Diplocaulus (meaning "double caul") was a genus of lepospondyl amphibians which lived from the Late Carboniferous to Permian periods of North America and Africa. Diplocaulus is by far the largest and best-known of the lepospondyls, characterized by a distinctive boomerang-shaped skull. Remains attributed to Diplocaulus have been found from the Late Permian of Morocco and represent the youngest-known occurrence of a lepospondyl.
Diplocaulus had a stocky, salamander-like body, but was relatively large, reaching up to 1 m (3.3 ft) in length. Although a complete tail is unknown for the genus, a nearly complete articulated skeleton described in 1917 preserved a row of tail vertebrae near the head. This was construed as circumstantial evidence for a long, thin tail capable of reaching the head if the animal was curled up. Most studies since this discovery have argued that anguiliform (eel-like) tail movement was the main force of locomotion utilized by Diplocaulus and its relatives. "


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#39

" Prehistoric Horses ?

By Mark Hallett
The evolution of the horse, a mammal of the family Equidae, occurred over a geologic time scale of 50 million years, transforming the small, dog-sized, forest-dwelling Eohippus into the modern horse. Paleozoologists have been able to piece together a more complete outline of the evolutionary lineage of the modern horse than of any other animal. Much of this evolution took place in North America, where horses originated but became extinct about 10,000 years ago.
The horse belongs to the order Perissodactyla (odd-toed ungulates), the members of which all share hooved feet and an odd number of toes on each foot, as well as mobile upper lips and a similar tooth structure. This means that horses share a common ancestry with tapirs and rhinoceroses. The perissodactyls arose in the late Paleocene, less than 10 million years after the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. This group of animals appears to have been originally specialized for life in tropical forests, but whereas tapirs and, to some extent, rhinoceroses, retained their jungle specializations, modern horses are adapted to life on drier land, in the much harsher climatic conditions of the steppes. "


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#40

" New Mawsonia ?

The biggest known Mawsonia specimen from Egypt and the new find from Brazil.
By Hyrotrioskjan on DeviantART
Mawsonia was a genus of prehistoric coelacanth fish, and the largest of this group, up to 4 meters long. It lived during the Cretaceous period (Albian and Cenomanian stages, about 99 to 112 million years ago). Fossils have been found in the Tegana and Aoufous Formations of Morocco, the Continental Intercalaire Formation of Algeria and Tunisia and the Ain el Guettar Formation of Tunisia, Africa, the Babouri Figuil Basin of Cameroon and the Bahia Group and Alcântara and Missão Velha Formations of Brazil, South America. Mawsonia was first described by British palaeontologist Arthur Smith Woodward in 1907. "


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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#41

" Know your Bee! ?


The ancestors of bees were wasps in the family Crabronidae, which were predators of other insects. The switch from insect prey to pollen may have resulted from the consumption of prey insects which were flower visitors and were partially covered with pollen when they were fed to the wasp larvae. This same evolutionary scenario may have occurred within the vespoid wasps, where the pollen wasps evolved from predatory ancestors. Until recently, the oldest non-compression bee fossil had been found in New Jersey amber, Cretotrigona prisca of Cretaceous age, a corbiculate bee. A bee fossil from the early Cretaceous (~100 mya), Melittosphex burmensis, is considered "an extinct lineage of pollen-collecting Apoidea sister to the modern bees". Derived features of its morphology (apomorphies) place it clearly within the bees, but it retains two unmodified ancestral traits (plesiomorphies) of the legs (two mid-tibial spurs, and a slender hind basitarsus), showing its transitional status. By the Eocene (~45 mya) there was already considerable diversity among eusocial bee lineages.

The earliest animal-pollinated flowers were shallow, cup-shaped blooms pollinated by insects such as beetles, so the syndrome of insect pollination was well established before the first appearance of bees.
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Visit our website ? ?
www.paleontologyworld.com ✔ "


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#42

Barbourofelis credit to homeofthedinosaur

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