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Dinictis felina

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-13-2018, 10:09 AM by epaiva )

Dinictis is a genus of the Nimravidae, an extinct family of feliform mammalian carnivores, also known as "false saber-toothed cats". Assigned to the subfamily Nimravinae, Dinictis was endemic to North America from the Late Eocene to Early Miocene epochs (37.2—20.4 mya),
Dinictis had a sleek body 1.1 metres  long, short legs 0.6 metres  high with only incompletely retractable claws, powerful jaws, and a long tail. It was very similar to its close relative, Hoplophoneus. The shape of its skull is reminiscent of a felid skull rather than of the extremely short skull of the Machairodontinae. Compared with those of the more recent machairodonts, its upper canines were relatively small, but they nevertheless distinctly protruded from its mouth. Below the tips of the canines, its lower jaw spread out in the form of a lobe.
credit to @fossilogic


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-13-2018, 10:07 AM by epaiva )

Skeleton (top) and reconstructed life appearance of Dinictis felina, and Skull of the nimravid sabertooth Dinictis felina in lateral (top), ventral (right), and dorsal (bottom) views.
taken from the book SABERTOOTH (Mauricio Anton)


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United States brotherbear Offline
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#3

How closely related is a nimravid to a true cat?
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-21-2018, 01:54 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @paleocollection


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United States brotherbear Offline
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http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/arti...elids.html   
 
Could nimravids and barbourfelids be considered true cats‭?
       By current definitions no,‭ ‬but by future definitions anything is possible.‭ ‬Most of the classification confusion about nimravids and barbourofelids all comes down to the fact that we are currently working to an incomplete fossil record of the Eocene to Miocene eras.‭ ‬While no one knows what the future holds,‭ ‬it is a virtual certainty that it is only a matter of time before the next nimravid or barbourofelid remains are found.‭ ‬Not only will these tell us more about the temporal and geological distribution of these two groups,‭ ‬we might strike lucky and find a new form that helps explain this difference and perhaps eventual progression of one form into another.‭ ‬Alternatively we may find an animal that could be more directly ancestral to this group and perhaps even the Felidae too.‭ ‬Discoveries such as scenario can and continue to happen in other fields of palaeontology,‭ ‬and while we should consider that this may never happen in for these two groups,‭ ‬we should at least continue to look for what is left to be found.
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-08-2018, 02:39 AM by epaiva )

Credits to @jbickkkk @ashinonyx and @bluewolfhowlin

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United States tigerluver Offline
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#7

This is a good paper describing the fossil remains of the species:
Notes on the Osteology and Systematic Position of Dinictis Felina, Leidy

The download is free. This species seems to be about half the size of a puma.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(06-08-2018, 02:53 AM)tigerluver Wrote: This is a good paper describing the fossil remains of the species:
Notes on the Osteology and Systematic Position of Dinictis Felina, Leidy

The download is free. This species seems to be about half the size of a puma.
@tigerluver
Thanks for your valuable information
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-30-2018, 07:01 PM by epaiva )

Dueling Dinictis one of the most dramatic mounted saber cats out there.
Credit to @fossilogic

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