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Conservation & Communities

India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-13-2018, 08:43 PM by Rishi )

In his book, Rise & Fall of the Emerald Tigers, WII scientist Raghunandan Singh Chundawat is of the view that we should protect tigers and not tigers inside the protected areas, as there’s a need for a more inclusive conservation model where local communities and the public at large become partners in the conservation effort.
He discusses the larger threats to Indian wildlife beyond Critical Habitats that are tiny core areas within protected reserves, only 3% of the countries land area—and the possible solutions.

In his portrait of the tendu leaf gatherers and herders, he shows an empathy for the tiger’s human neighbors. Drawing on his own experiences of running a specialist wildlife lodge, The Sarai At Toria, he argues private public partnerships can generate revenues which he is particular should be shared with local communities.

He discusses protected areas during the later part of the book where he states that ‘it is risky to entirely depend entirely on the protected area network for conservation’. Here one agrees with him but in a few pages he moves on to say ‘at present, all our conservation eggs are in one, old, basket; protected area network’. For a culture with conservation ethos (albeit with conservation values disappearing fast like he has pointed out) protected areas are fairly recent and surely not the only practice – we have a long-standing culture of community conservation areas, for example.

Also i should mention that the idea for this thread came from @Jimmy's Chitwan National Park Visit thread.
Quote:
(11-30-2018, 03:06 PM)Rishi Wrote: India should start this kind of trekking & foot safari along forest trail in the buffers of our tiger reserves. That'll be reasonably safe & would create livelihood for the local forest dwellers.
I know it's done only in few places, like Satpura & Periyar.
Brilliant!

It's most definitely on my to-do list now.

Yup for the livelihood of the locals, tourist activities in buffer zone is a must, many locals have also been employed as nature guides here apart from their cultural dance which was included in the package.

To reduce forest dependency of the forest dependent communities living in the buffers & fringes/multiple-use forests, it's not enough to simply compensate them for a cattle killed by predators, or crops destroyed by raiding deers, antelopes, pigs, elephants... We must strive to make them stakeholders in conservation. Because outside the protected areas only thing that is keeping an animal alive is the goodwill & tolerance of the locals.

Attempts are being made worldwide, this thread is for all such steps taken in the right direction!
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Rishi Offline
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Source: www.nepalitimes.com



With rapidly increasing number of tigers, as well as people, in all of Terai, India and Nepal cooperate in crossborder conservation while involving the local communities to ensure them a future safe from the threat of cross-border poaching or human-wildlife conflict.

Near the Indian border villagers has fortified their cattle sheds, but still fearnpredator attacks.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Both India and Nepal are now getting communities on both sides of the border involved in conservation. The two governments, with the help of World Wildlife Fund (WWF), have installed solar-electric fences to stop animals from entering villages, distributed biogas and LPG gas to reduce use of firewood, promoted livestock management to reduce encroachment into forests, and formed Rapid Rescue Teams (RRT) and Community-Based Anti-Poaching Units (CBAPU).

Women in India’s Valmiki Tiger Reserve cutting tall grass last week to attract deer to support the tiger population.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Last year, when several rhinos from Chitwan were swept into India by a flood, residents of Binwaliya village in Bihar rescued some and returned them to Nepal.
“The rhino was in the field, and we called the Forest Department which tranquilised it and sent it back. Previously, if we saw wild animals in our villages, we would try to shoo it away, injure it, or kill it.”
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Ashutosh Offline
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India accounts for 31% of wildlife ranger deaths in the world. A new docu-series about the actual heroes of Indian conservation, the rangers on the ground are finally given their dues in “Heroes of the Wild Frontiers”. 

This Animal planet series is shot in Kaziranga, Andaman, Pakke, Hemis, Sundarbans and Elephant corridors of Assam.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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An article providing insight into the contemporary challenges facing Ethiopia's wildlife

 https://www.theguardian.com/environment/...iopia-park
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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Use of surrogate species to cost‐effectively prioritize conservation actions

Abstract:

Conservation efforts often focus on umbrella species whose distributions overlap with many other flora and fauna. However, because biodiversity is affected by different threats that are spatially variable, focusing only on the geographic range overlap of species may not be sufficient in allocating the necessary actions needed to efficiently abate threats. We developed a problem‐based method for prioritizing conservation actions for umbrella species that maximizes the total number of flora and fauna benefiting from management while considering threats, actions, and costs. We tested our new method by assessing the performance of the Australian federal government's umbrella prioritization list, which identifies 73 umbrella species as priorities for conservation attention. Our results show that the federal government priority list benefits only 6% of all Australia's threatened terrestrial species. This could be increased to benefit nearly half (or 46%) of all threatened terrestrial species for the same budget of AU$550 million/year if more suitable umbrella species were chosen. This results in a 7‐fold increase in management efficiency. We believe nations around the world can markedly improve the selection of prioritized umbrella species for conservation action with this transparent, quantitative, and objective prioritization approach.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" As reported today by China’s state news agency Xinhua, a study led by South China Agricultural University suggests that #pangolins were the vector for the new strain of coronavirus currently paralyzing China and responsible for hundreds of deaths.


The #pangolin a scaly anteater, is the most heavily trafficked wild mammal in the world, with its meat considered a delicacy in parts of Asia and its scales used in traditional medicine. In one such dish, raw blood is poured over rice. The animals are also consumed in Africa as bushmeat.
Benin-born actor Djimon Hounsou, @djimon_hounsou , who investigated wildlife markets with WildAid this past November to rescue live pangolins, stated: “Africa needs to heed the lessons from China and close down these markets immediately. As well as a massive risk to health, they endanger species and are inhumane.”


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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" There are many health risks to handling and consuming pangolins. A few years ago we made this PSA with Asian mega-star @JayChou. Its time to ban all live wildlife markets and all pangolins products. This is not just an animal welfare issue. It's a public health one too. "




I strongly hope that the wildlife markets will be definitely banned ! Thank to the pangolins...
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