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Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)- Data, Pictures & Videos

Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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Subhash Nair: " The Sibling Fights! ? Tag your Sibling! - Cheetahs Photographed at Masai Mara, Kenya. "


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Daniel Rosengren: " A cheetah mother with her three almost fully grown cubs. Can you spot who is the mother?
Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. . "



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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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On the alert...


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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" "Cubs at Play"

Two young Cheetah Cubs at play with a piece of Springbok Skin leaf behind from the kill their mom had made earlier in the day.⁣
Did you know ?⁣
Cheetah females have a gestation period of 92-95 days; and will give birth to a litter of approximately three or five cubs, the cubs weighing in at around 250 grams at birth. Cheetah cubs are completely helpless and blind at birth, however they develop rapidly and within 10 days their eyes have opened and they have begun to crawl around. By three weeks old their teeth have broken through their gums.⁣
This was photographed in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa ⁣ "


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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Beverly Joubert: " Grooming is a vital part of cheetah life. Although these cats are not as social as lions, they are also not as solitary as many other wild cats. Cubs will stay with their mothers for some time before heading off on their own and males often form coalitions that give them an advantage when securing a meal, so it's not uncommon to see cheetahs moving in groups. Acts of mutual grooming help to strengthen bonds between individuals and these slender cats are even known to purr when interacting. Of course, a smear of fresh blood on the face is likely to attract a bit of extra attention!⁣"


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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Mark Drury: " Mother and cub. "


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Jens Cullmann: " Hanging out ... only after the heat of the day the cheetah mum moved with her cute cubs away "


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Sanju Offline
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Fota Wildlife Park announce the birth of Northern cheetah cubs

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Fota Wildlife Park has announced the birth of three Northern cheetah cubs

Fota Wildlife Park in Cork has announced the birth of three Northern cheetah cubs (Acinonyx j. soemmeringii) to mother Nimpy and father Sam. 
Fota is calling on the public to help name the cubs via an online survey on its blog and are offering a chance to win one of three year-long conversation annual passes to the park.

The cubs, one male and two females, were born on June 10 and have only recently started venturing out of their cubbing den. They have spent the last few days enjoying the mild weather, playing together in the grass and on the logs of their habitat in an area known as Cheetah Hill in Fota.
 
The cubs' mother Nimpy is 10-years-old and was born in Parc Zoologique de La Palmyre, France and the father Sam is four-years-old and was born in Wadi Al Safa Wildlife Centre, Dubai, UAE. Sam arrived in Fota in 2017 and has had two other litters of cubs this year.

Nimpy and Sam are part of the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria Northern cheetah breeding programme. The birth of these cubs brings the total for this endangered species born in Fota to 204. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has classified the subspecies status for the Northern cheetah as endangered. A 2017 expert report on the decline of the cheetah suggested that in the natural range of the species, there were fewer than 2,800 left in the wild in the whole of East and North Africa. The Asiatic cheetah is critically endangered in Iran with less than 40 animals left in the wild.

“We are delighted to be announcing a second litter of Northern cheetah cubs since re-opening in May. Without a doubt, the Northern cheetah is the most successful breeding programme here at Fota and the species has become synonymous with the Park - it’s even on our logo. We put that breeding success down to the naturalistic habitats and environments that we create for the animals," said Fota lead ranger Julien Fonteneau.

Fota Wildlife Park, a conservation charity, estimates it lost €1.5 million in revenues during the 10-week closure earlier in the year due to Covid-19. Since then it has introduced an online booking system to safely manage the numbers entering the park, capping the maximum amount of people at any one time within the 100-acre park at 1,500.

Fota Wildlife Park is now open from 9am to 7pm daily. Entry tickets are available only via pre-booking online.

https://www.offalyexpress.ie/news/news/5...-cubs.html
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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" On a cold and overcast morning, we found a male cheetah resting on a termite mound when a few impala in a thicket nearby caught his attention. Making use of the cool weather and the wind to his advantage, he set off stalking the unsuspecting impala. "


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Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-20-2020, 10:30 AM by Sanju )

Three Asiatic cheetahs spotted in Semnan

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Park rangers have spotted three Asiatic cheetahs in near Sharoud in Semnan province, central Iran.
“A Park ranger has managed to capture the picture of a three-member group of Asiatic cheetahs near Biarjomand village, which is in the vicinity of Khar Turan National Park [also known as Turan Wildlife Refuge],” Amir Abdoos, head of the provincial office of Department of Environment said on Monday.

He added that the spotted cheetahs have raised hopes for the survival of the endangered species in the region.

Abdoos noted that two cheetah cubs were also spotted near Biarjomand in mid-spring. This indicates a growing population of the species in the region, he sai
*This image is copyright of its original author
Asiatic cheetahs and Persian leopards are among the most endangered species in the world. Big cats have been listed as "endangered" in the red list of the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Reduced prey population and shrinkage of their natural habitat are threatening the big cats.

Khar Turan National Park, situated in the southeast of Shahrud city, stretches to 1,400,000 hectares while being the second largest reserve in the country after Naybandan Wildlife Refuge.
The park is home to one of the largest populations of the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah.

With the increasing numbers of cheetahs in Khar Turan, there is an estimated population of around 40 individuals.
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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Marlon du Toit: " A male cheetah atop a termite mound looks back across his shoulder at his coalition brother.

I find cheetah very challenging to photograph. Anyone else share this sentiment with me?
See, one issue is that their eyes are very deep-set, making it difficult for the eyes to be filled with light. It’s best to photograph them in the early morning or late afternoon.
Secondly, I find that they need to do something truly interesting to make for a great photo, or be complimented by their surroundings. They’re often in that seemingly uncomfortable position with head at a severe angle, or lying down on a termite mound. To do them justice in a single click can prove challenging, in my experience.
I took this yesterday morning whilst hosting our very first @wildeyesa guests @sabisabireserve Earth Lodge. It was a great weekend & truly happy to be back in the field again."


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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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" In an exceptional afternoon drive we found five cheetahs laying low in the long grass – a mother with her 4 sub-adult cubs were on an Impala kill. By the time we found them, there was not much meat left on the kill. They were lounging around in a nice warm spot, digesting their full bellies. "


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BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-19-2020, 09:13 PM by BorneanTiger )

@Sanju You can find more information for the Asiatic cheetah in this thread.

@peter It seems that the Asiatic cheetah (currently Acinonyx jubatus venaticus) is much more closely related to the Southern African cheetah (currently Acinonyx jubatus jubatus) than say the Asiatic lion is to the Southern African lion, with an estimated age of separation of only 4,500–6,500 years, thus that using the Southern African cheetah for reintroduction in India is somewhat justified, even if not to the same extent as using the Iranian cheetah (which is obviously more closely related to the extinct Indian cheetah) for reintroduction: https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/...71/3836924

A South African cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus) in the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve, by M. Wegmann:
   

On the S-28 at Lower Sabie, Kruger National Park, by user Mukul2u (13th of August, 2008):
   
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Czech Republic Spalea Offline
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Zhhayynn James: " A monochrome of a trio of cheetahs sitting out a rainstorm in Ndutu. I love photographing wildlife in the rain! "


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The biggest cheetahs in the world are Asiatic Cheetahs
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