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Cat anatomy

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#76

(10-25-2018, 01:45 PM)brotherbear Wrote: I'm curious as to how captive big cats compare physically with their wild brothers and sisters. I understand that being dependent on the individual people caring for them, that some captive zoo or circus big cats will be healthier than others. But overall, on average, would the captive animals be healthier than those living in the wild?

Even if the captive big cats live much more times than in wild and can be bigger, you cannot compare: free big cats are much more stronger. Life in wild mobilises all the senses. The captive felids bore to death and the boredom is seldom mortal, fatal.
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Finland Shadow Online
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#77

(10-25-2018, 07:21 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(10-25-2018, 01:45 PM)brotherbear Wrote: I'm curious as to how captive big cats compare physically with their wild brothers and sisters. I understand that being dependent on the individual people caring for them, that some captive zoo or circus big cats will be healthier than others. But overall, on average, would the captive animals be healthier than those living in the wild?

Even if the captive big cats live much more times than in wild and can be bigger, you cannot compare: free big cats are much more stronger. Life in wild mobilises all the senses. The captive felids bore to death and the boredom is seldom mortal, fatal.

Not a simple question, depending a lot how you approach it. Of course when in good place and getting medical care and good nutrition, physically they have to be in excellent condition. Then again mentally it is more complex matter. It is sad to see wild animals in captivity without a really good reason. 

I can understand people like Doug Seus, who have taken some orphanages, which would have died otherwise. When giving a good place to live and really giving to these animals some meaningful activities, it is difficult to see them suffer there. Still my opinion is, that animals shouldn´t be in captivity unless there is some real meaning to conservation of those animals. Too many quite sad places among zoos.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#78

(10-25-2018, 07:21 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(10-25-2018, 01:45 PM)brotherbear Wrote: I'm curious as to how captive big cats compare physically with their wild brothers and sisters. I understand that being dependent on the individual people caring for them, that some captive zoo or circus big cats will be healthier than others. But overall, on average, would the captive animals be healthier than those living in the wild?

Even if the captive big cats live much more times than in wild and can be bigger, you cannot compare: free big cats are much more stronger. Life in wild mobilises all the senses. The captive felids bore to death and the boredom is seldom mortal, fatal.

You're actually asking 2 different questions...

Physically: Cats in the wild are more impressive when it comes to Musculature, body frame size is similar but captive cats generally are more robust, if they are well fed they tend to look more round or stocky. Captive cats will usually have some fat as well, wild cats do not. They are either skinny or in great condition, I've never seen any wild cat come close to being "stocky or round."
Wild Cats also have lots of scars, they are more tattered looking at times while captive cats generally have a much more clean look about them. The most prominent difference physically, if you can even call it physical is their face, especially their eyes. Wild cats are killers, they look at you as either a threat, nuisance or lunch while Captive Cats usually look at you as entertainment to break the monotony of their day up or they look a bit lost and bored, especially when they start cage walking back and forth. Captive cats don't have the killer look of their wild counterparts, it's hard to put into words but you know it when you see it. 

Health: Captive cats can live to 20 plus, wild cats live to 13 if they are lucky, usually ages older than that are either with assistance from the FD or extremely rare natural occurrences. Wild cats face far more pressures on their life which contribute to their early deaths, it's not necessarily because a captive cat is healthier that it lives longer than a wild one, the captive one just doesn't have to worry about starvation, being wounded by prey or foe, poached, poisoned by snakes or insects, inclement weather or extreme drought, etc. 
But remove those outside factors and I have little doubt that a wild cat wouldn't live just as long as a captive cat if the tables were turned. If anything, a wild cat lives a far more healthy lifestyle outside of the harshness of the wild itself. 
They eat a far more lean and nutrient rich variety of food, they are able to mentally stimulate themselves with new adventure and will not suffer the depression of being unfree. Their food is also free of hormones and pesticides and their genes are usually that of healthy and strong individuals compared to captive cats which can be irresponsibly bred.

IMO, there is no comparison, a wild cat is the superior specimen.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#79

CARNIVORE SKULLS - IDENTIFICATION AND MEASUREMENT - FOR ECOLOGISTS (M.A. Adibi, Research, October 2016)

Found this a few days ago. Must read for those interested in skulls of carnivores: 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mohammad_Ali_Adibi/publication/309320542_Carnivores_Skulls_-_Identification_and_Measurement_-_for_Ecologists/links/5809cf5a08ae1c98c253a84b/Carnivores-Skulls-Identification-and-Measurement-for-Ecologists.pdf
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Germany Lycaon Online
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#80

Thought this was interesting to see . shows india's big cats jaws.

Credits to Siddhesh Mungekar


*This image is copyright of its original author
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