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Carnivorous dinosaurs other than the famous t-rex and spinosaurus..

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" Title: Gorgosaurus Illustration. Artist: @fredward95 "



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Canada DinoFan83 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-04-2020, 01:58 AM by DinoFan83 )

I'd like to address some of Scott Hartman's statements in regards to Tyrannosaurus and Giganotosaurus size.

On his website (link), when comparing the sizes of Tyrannosaurus and Giganotosaurus, Scott Hartman states "As near as I can tell, despite Tyrannosaurus and Giganotosaurus appearing similar in size in side view, there is little question that T. rex is actually the larger theropod based on known specimens."
Many read this and believe Tyrannosaurus to undoubtedly be the larger, but this isn't necessarily true, for several reasons.

Here is why:

-As I have gone over above, there are several factors that end up underscoring the mass of Hartman's Giganotosaurus by a good bit compared to what the real animal probably weighed (such as too little soft tissue and a significantly too shallow torso); using the GDI of GetAwayTrike's likely better skeletal, we have a mass range of ~7.53-9.49 tonnes for the 2 Giganotosaurus specimens, compared to the ~6.8-8.2 tonnes of Hartman's skeletal as-is.
The upper end of this (~9.49 tonnes) outmasses the estimated ~8.4 tonnes for Sue, thus when comparing Sue and MUCPv-95 as Hartman did, but using GetAwayTrike's skeletal, Giganotosaurus would be the larger theropod based on known specimens, by well over a ton.

-Scott Hartman is using Sue as the representative of the entire species; not the best idea as it is a very large and old specimen in a sample size of over 30, and many adults such as Bucky and B-rex are significantly smaller than it. Moreover, when looking at our entire sample size of Tyrannosaurus adults, the average is about 6 tonnes as I have went over in the Tyrannosaurus thread, which both Giganotosaurus specimens and the average mass of them are larger than, by 2.51 tonnes.

-Even if Sue was larger than MUCPv-95, that wouldn't necessarily mean Tyrannosaurus was the larger animal as a species - we would, as previously stated, need to look at the mean mass of both species based on all specimens of both species to determine which was larger as it is a far better sample than merely maximum vs maximum.

As previously stated in this thread, there are many adult Tyrannosaurus specimens that both specimens of Giganotosaurus match or outsize (such as UCMP 118742, BHI 3033, MOR 980, LACM 23844, MOR 008, MOR 555, CM 1400, AMNH 5027, RTMP 81.6.1, RTMP 81.12.1, BHI 4182, MOR 1128, CM 9380, MOR 1125, and USNM 6183).
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" Closely related to the larger and more recent Tyrannosaurus, Daspletosaurus had dozens of large, sharp teeth and the small forelimbs typical of tyrannosaurids. Daspletosaurus was at the top of the food chain, probably preying on large dinosaurs such as ceratopsids and hadrosaurs.
Art: Raúl Martin. "



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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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Christian Reno: " Wiehenvenator "





paleoart by : Leo t.rex
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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This post completes and follows the post #199.

Wiehenvenator was a megalosaurid from the Middle Jurassic in Germany (165 millions years).

Length: 8-10 meters long
Weight: 2 tons.



*This image is copyright of its original author


Wiehenvenator Albati, the monster of Minden.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" Tarbosaurus runs down Gallimimus "





paleoart by : Luis V.Rey
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Paulo Leite: " Herrerasaurus commission that I just finished "


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" Torvosaurus infographic


Torvosaurus belongs to a group of megalosaurid theropod dinosaurs. There were two species of Torvosaurus that lived in North America and Europe, 153 to 148 million years ago (late Jurassic). First fossil of Torvosaurus was found in 1972 in Colorado and fully-described 7 years later. Aside from Colorado, fossils of Torvosaurus were also found in Utah, Wyoming and on the Iberian peninsula (Europe). Torvosaurus lived in the floodplains, wetlands and forests. It was one of the largest and fiercest predators of Jurassic period.

Interesting Torvosaurus Facts:
Torvosaurus was able to reach length of 33 to 40 feet and weight of 2 to 5 tons.European species of Torvosaurus: Torvosaurus gurneyi was slightly smaller than its American cousin: Torvosaurus tanneri. Despite slightly smaller size, it was still the largest predator of Jurassic Europe.
Torvosaurus was closely related to Megalosaurus, large carnivorous dinosaur that lived during the mid Jurassic period in the southern parts of England.
Torvosaurus had elongated, narrow snout, heavy body, powerful hind legs and short, but strong arms equipped with long, sharp claws (shaped like talons of eagle). Some researchers believe that claw on the thumb was especially good developed.
Torvosaurus had long tail that was very stiff at the base."


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" One of the best in his family. Suchomimus tenerensis by the hands of the talented @saraphis_creations , the colors used hurl a swampy animal that should have been frightening when fishing, even in family members like Baryonix, dinosaur remains were found, indicating that they hunted whenever possible.

Follow @saraphis_creations to view and buy amazing dinosaurs. "


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" Flock of Deinonychus, by Zhao Chuang "


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" Utahraptor gained fame by starring in Jurassic Park. No you say, it was Velociraptor. Indeed, moviemaker Steven Spielberg used the name, Velociraptor in his movies, however, in reality, Velociraptor is less than half the size of the dinosaurs depicted in Jurassic Park. Utahraptor was found the year that Jurassic Park came out and gave scientific credence to the large-sized raptors in the movies. It’s just that they are really utahraptors not velociraptors!

A very large, deep, thin, blade-like claw core bone was uncovered in October, 1991, by Carl Limone, Preparator at the CEU Prehistoric Museum. The new claw’s similarity to the slashing claw on the foot of Deinonychus and Velociraptor of the dromaeosaurid family of dinosaurs was immediately recognized by the quarry personnel. The dromaeosaurid dinosaurs were the most savage predators, pound for pound, ever to have walked the earth. At 9 inches long, the bony core supported a claw which in life would have been 15 inches long, indicating an animal twice the size of Deinonychus. Additional finds, including bones of the skull and upper jaw, support this conclusion

Art: Riccardo Frapiccini "


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" Allosaurus, by highdarktemplar - deviantart "


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