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Capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris)

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) it is the largest rodent in the world with a head and body length excluding the tail of 1,06 to 1,34 mt and a shoulder height of 55 to 65 cm, they weight from 35 to 65 kg with males larger than females. They live in big groups in the Venezuelan Llanos, they spend most of the time in the water or close to the water. When they are adults their predators are Anacondas, Jaguars, Pumas and Orinoco Crocodiles, when they are young they have many predators Caiman crocodilus, Ocelots, Jaguarundis,  Foxes, Birds of Prey  and Piranhas,  they have an average of 4 youngs (1 to 7) they get birth two or more times during the year. In Big Ranches called Hatos in Venezuela where they are not hunted by man you can see big numbers of Capibaras.
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United States Polar Offline
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Neochoerus pinckneyi

"Neochoerus pinckneyi was a North Americanspecies of capybara. While capybaras originated in South America, formation of the Isthmus of Panama three million years ago allowed some of them to migrate north as part of the Great American Interchange. Capybaras and porcupines are the only caviomorph rodents that reached temperate North America during this exchange (a much greater diversity of North American rodents invaded South America). At 90 to 113 kg (200 to 250 pounds), 40% larger than the living capybara,[1] N. pinckneyi is one of the largest rodent species ever discovered, surpassed only by the recently discovered Josephoartigasia monesi, several species of Phoberomys, and possibly the Pleistocene giant beaver."

There was a North American relative too. One question is, though, on which continent did capybaras originate from?
"If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago."

- E.O Wilson
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Capybaras in the Venezuelan Llanos, the one with an open circular wound I believe was produced by a bite of a big Red Belly Piranha (Pygocentrus cariba).
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-25-2017, 07:25 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @pantanaloficial


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-31-2018, 06:46 AM by epaiva )

Taken from de book The Encyclopedia of Mammals Edited by Dr David Macdonald

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Capybara Skull from Venezuelan Llanos
It measures 24,1 centimeters long 13,2 centimeters wide, they do a lot of damage when they bite with their large teeth

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