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Captive Lion and Tiger weights

United States Pckts Offline
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#1


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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-03-2014, 10:10 AM by peter )

Good information PC, but difficult to assess as most entries are healthy and well-fed adults. What about the others? Any population has young adults, prime, old, small, big as well as gorged and empty animals. In some averages, the 'normal' amount of variation is included, whereas it isn't in others.  

Captive big cats, like their wild counterparts, show a lot of variation. I saw healthy adult male Amur tigers of 350 pounds or thereabout in their prime. They are just as a-typical as 650-pound males. Same for Indian tigers, although they show less variation than Amurs (in wild animals, it's the other way round). There are no reliable averages for captive animals, but my take for now is captive male Amur tigers top the list in all departments with some male lions quite close. From what I saw and read, the differences between Indian tigers and Kruger lions are limited (captive animals).   

There are no captive Indian tigers in European zoos. Some trainers, however, have descendants of Indian tigers. It is to be expected these tigers will disappear in the near future, because they can't be used in the circus any longer.   

Panthera tigris americana (referring to Indian tigers in American zoos), to me, seem different from Panthera tigris tigris. My guess is most are a mix of Amur and Indian tigers. Big animals in most cases, but I wouldn't say they is Indian tigers until we know a bit more.

As a general rule, circus lions and tigers are healthier and bigger than big cats in zoos. Another general rule is lions adapt better to captivity than tigers. They lose less in character and often are a bit bigger than their wild relatives. In tigers, apart from captive Amurs, the opposite seems to be true.

Those who could know all agreed captive big cats are a mere shadow of their wild counterparts. This seems to be more true for tigers than for lions, because the essence of lions (defending a territory by living in family groups) is maintained in captivity to an extent, whereas the essence of tigers (solitary hunters) is completely lost in captivity.
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United States Pckts Offline
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Completely aggreed. Captive Tigers also surprisingly seem to be much more tolerent of each other and seem to co exist fairly well as long as no territories are established for them to protect as well as animals are all well fed. Harbin Park is a perfect example of tigers living in harmony together. But at the same token, tigers are always said to be hard to read and can flip a switch at any moment and become a killer. Lions whether in captivity or the wild co exist with similar family structures.
Here is another speaking of the size difference of bengals and amurs in captivity.
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United States Siegfried Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-11-2014, 08:56 PM by Siegfried )

The weights of captive cats in captivity are subject to a few factors.  Many big cats in captivity are overfed in an attempt to improve docility.  A hungry big cat is no doubt a more dangerous one, so keepers will sometimes just try to keep them fat and happy. The neutering of animals often plays a role in an animal's weight as well, whether wild or domestic.  While it is seen to a lesser extent in neutered females, it is more pronounced in male animals that have been neutered.  It seems male big cats in captivity (and male cats in general) are particularly susceptible to obesity when neutered.  That is, with the exception of male lions.  Most male lions in captivity are routinely given vasectomies as opposed to the more effective method of castration.  Vasectomies are performed despite their lesser effectiveness (and greater expense) so that the male lion does not lose its mane.  You will occasionally see a castrated and thereby maneless lion.  Most of the castrated lions that I've seen tend to support this, as they have been obese too.  There are however always exceptions.     

 
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United States Pckts Offline
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Some are nuetered, some are not. Many captive bengals are kept unnueterd to keep the genes alive. Same in Harbin, to keep the siberian gene alive (so they claim) 
The table also shows the body type of the cats. Some are muscular or bulky or obese, etc.
Many cats are easily viewable so you can see if they look to be more or less "fat"
Overall, no captive cat will ever be as fit as a cat that lives in the wild. But doesn't mean that there aren't quite a few impressive specimens out there. 
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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You can add these two siberian tigers to the list...

These are two tigers from John Ball Zoo, they are three year old males named Yuri and Kuza and they both weigh 204 kg.


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United States Pckts Offline
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Nice find, good size for a couple of sub adults. TFS
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United States Pckts Offline
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Hello there photographer! I'm here for my closeup! When Doc gets this close, it makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. At 560 lbs he can be quite intimidating. Very thankful for fencing! #tiger #noahsark www.noahs-ark.org

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Little ann close to 200lbs I believe. I think around 180lbs or so for reference.
 
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Netherlands peter Offline
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MALE AMUR TIGER DVUR KRALOVY ZOO

203,00 cm. - Head and body length
084,00 cm. - Circumference of the skull
190,00 kg. - Weight



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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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Greetings, this is my new list for Captive Amur tigers body masses...

 
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United States Pckts Offline
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(06-21-2015, 01:07 AM)'Kingtheropod' Wrote: Greetings, this is my new list for Captive Amur tigers body masses...

 
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Is there any way to add body length and shoulder height if its available?
Thanks for sharing, nice work.


 
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India sanjay Offline
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@Kingtheropod , This Can be classifeid between Male and Female ?
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-26-2015, 02:02 AM by Pckts )

"He weighs 260kg, has a bone-crushing bite and paws the size of dinner plates, but Phevos the tiger is the latest victim of Greece's economic crisis - and this week he left the country for a new home on other side of the world."

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http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30435069

Images and video of him being measured and shipped attached to the link above.
 
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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this huge Asiatic male lion comes from a sweedish zoo, and he is massive weighed a a whole 191,5 when he was old. imagen how heavy this lion could be in his prime! 


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it's on sweedish, but I'll translate: our male lion Kaya was put down a while ago, due to age related deseases, he then weighed 191,5 kg. we don't know he's length. 
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Australia Richardrli Offline
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What subspecies is Phevos?
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