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Captive Lion and Tiger weights

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#46

It could also be a genetic throwback as all tiger subspecies can produce the uncanny look that resembles other subspecies.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#47
( This post was last modified: 11-08-2016, 10:51 PM by Pckts )

Hattiesburg zoo tiger weights

"Tigger was around 350 pounds. Kuasa is 300 and Cinta is about 285. "

Stephen Taylor
Animal Care Manager
Hattiesburg zoo

On Nov 8, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Sam Thompson <sthompson@hattiesburg.org> wrote:


Tigger  "Amur Tigress" RIP

*This image is copyright of its original author


Tiggers Father was John, 500lb Male

Hattiesburg Zoo's beloved tiger passes away

The Hattiesburg Zoo has lost one of its most beloved attractions, John the Tiger.

The 15-year-old cat was euthanized by Zoo staff and local veterinarians Monday after he became paralyzed Thursday.

"John was treated extensively in hopes of reducing the swelling and alleviating the paralysis, but his condition rapidly deteriorated to the point our senior staff and veterinary partners felt our best choice was to take this humane action," said Zoo Director Lori Banchero.

A veterinary necropsy performed Monday evening found a cancerous growth on his intestines as well as acute spondylosis, a spinal degeneration and deformity of the joints of of the spine, common with aging. John's discs showed signs of severe wear and ultimately were the cause of his paralysis.

"John, was treated for arthritis in his legs as well as other age related health concerns during the past two years," Banchero said. "We tried to do our best for him, but nature had other plans."

John came to the Zoo in 1994 and rapidly became one of the main attractions. Often seen playing in the pool, he was known to splash and sometimes even "mark" visitors, leading them to scurry from the viewing area.

Following sessions, he often sucked his thumb while lying in the grass of the exhibit.

"Seeing such a large animal - a full 500 pounds - suck his thumb always delighted our visitors," Banchero said. "It was those little behaviors that made him beloved."

Zoo visitors, keepers and staff will have more than memories of John, as he fathered the Zoo's female tiger, Tigger, in 1997.

The Zoo has no immediate plans to replace the tiger in as they are in the development process of creating and funding a new Asian exhibit.

For further information or to make a donation to the Asian exhibit in John's memory, contact the Hattiesburg Zoo at 601-545-4576.
http://www.wdam.com/story/7900340/hattie...asses-away




Kusa and Cinta "Sumatran Brothers"
There is a video of them being weighed on their FB page as well.

Hattiesburg Zoo
Outside, I get to see my big brother Kuasa! We’re best friends and I hate being away from him. We have to sleep in separate rooms at night because sometimes we like to argue when the keepers aren’t looking. But, it’s always great seeing him first thing in the morning! #TakeoverTuesday #CintaTakeover

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#48

(11-04-2016, 12:07 AM)Pckts Wrote: All from @Amnon242 


7yo, 220 kg. Pure muscle, very agile and elegant in his moves (despite his impressive size). Agressive. 3years ago, he attacked the breeder and escaped to the visitors area of the zoo. 


*This image is copyright of its original author


This amur was 196 kg when weighted...I dont know what was his age at the time of weighing, but he was certainly less than 7 years. At this photo he looks quite robust, but when I saw him he seemed like lean animal to me. In next cage there was different male amur, 17yo...and this one was much...much bigger. I dont know his weight but he must have been over 250 kg. 

*This image is copyright of its original author


Zoo Prague. Asiatic lion Jamwan (4yo), malayan tigers Johann and Kavi. Im not sure about the age of tigers, but I think that Johann is 4-5yo and Kavi 10-11yo.
The tigers can be 140-150 kg...Johann is robust, while Kavi is lean and elegant (btw tiger #381 is Kavi...and not amur tiger Mauglis).

Johann

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author




All credit to Amnon

This pictures are excellent for comparison images. @Amnon242, do you have more information about these particular tigers? In particular for the two at the beginning.
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#49
( This post was last modified: 11-15-2016, 05:07 PM by Kingtheropod )

Tiger not to blame for abbot's injuries, doctor says
Piyarach Chongcharoen and AFP

KANCHANABURI — The tiger that mauled the abbot of the province’s renowned “Tiger Temple” (Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua) inflicted only “little scratches”, the monk’s doctor said, noting most of the 64-year-old’s injuries resulted from him falling.

Dr Sahathep Sawarngnet, director of Thanakarn Hospital, said Monday that Phra Vissuthisaradhera, better known as Luangta Chan, suffered a broken right wrist, broken upper front tooth and swelling and bleeding in the mouth in the Saturday incident. The monk also sustained scratches to the left side of his face, near his forehead.

Luangta Chan, was walking Hern Fa, a male Bengal tiger about seven years old, on Saturday afternoon when he accidentally slipped and fell to the ground, jerking the big cat's leash.

"It didn't intend to attack him at all", Dr Sahathep told AFP. adding that the abbot had relayed the story to him.

"If it was a real attack, his face would have been torn apart – but there was only a scratching line from his forehead to his lips," said the doctor, adding that the abbot broke his tooth and wrist when he fell onto the ground.

According to Dr Sahathep the tiger weighed 300 kilograms and had been at the temple for seven years.

The abbot was now recovering and would likely be discharged later this week, the doctor told AFP, adding that he was admitted to intensive care as a precaution due to his previous heart problems, appearing to downplay the severity of his injuries.

http://www.bangkokpost.com/learning/lear...ws/573195/
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#50


*This image is copyright of its original author


Gloria Johnson and TJ, a 2 year old golden Siberian tiger weighing in at 500 pounds, explore the trunk of an old live oak tree on the Savage Kingdom compound near Bushnell.

After further investigation, this tiger actually has partial Bengal ancestry.

http://markwallheiser.photoshelter.com/i...MS2wLEU9kY
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#51


*This image is copyright of its original author


He is the most celebrated non-Louisiana native on campus. His home, a $4 million natural habitat complete with a waterfall and a pool, is one of the most visited attractions at LSU. He is the live, walking and roaring face of our university—Mike VI, who celebrates his 5th birthday Friday, July 23.
Hailing from the small town of Idaville, Ind., Mike VI arrived on campus in 2007 when he was 2 years old, weighing 320 pounds. The LSU community met Mike VI Sept. 1, 2007, and he was given his official title later that month. He made his first public appearance in Tiger Stadium during the LSU vs. Florida football game, on a Saturday evening in October.
Currently weighing 460 pounds, he is expected to reach 500-600 pounds at maturity, in about another year. Mike VI enjoys 15 pounds of food each day, 105 pounds each week. His meals consist of 5-pound logs of ground meat, which include the proper vitamins and minerals Mike needs. He is also given a supplemental B vitamin once a week, and vitamin E capsules each night, for healthy skin and hair, along with general well-being. For his birthday, he might enjoy a frozen ox tail, as a treat.
Mike is cared for each day by two veterinary students and his personal veterinarian from the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. David Baker. His student caretakers visit him daily, check on him and survey his habitat, where more than 100,000 fans visit him each year.
“Mike is generally very playful in the early morning and late evening,” said Nicholas Cross, one of Mike’s veterinary student caretakers. “You will find him sleeping most of the day, keeping cool in the shade of the bamboo and vines surrounding the enclosure. When he is not sleeping, he enjoys swimming in his pool, chasing his boomer ball and watching visitors come and go.”
Mike’s popularity is evident by the fact that LSU fans donated the entire $4 million that it took to build his world-class habitat. The “I Like Mike” campaign, along with the Tiger Athletic Foundation, are dedicated to caring for Mike and educating others about tigers around the world. Facts and information about tigers can be found around Mike’s habitat, such as tigers in history, Chinese mythology, the sleeping and eating habits of tigers and even the Year of the Tiger (1998, 2010, 2022).
“Mike is a fascinating animal,” Cross said. “What impresses me most is his intelligence. He recognizes the sight and sounds of our cars upon arrival at the enclosure.”
The LSU community has celebrated its live mascot for 74 years, since Mike I arrived on campus in 1936. Two years before Mike I became a part of LSU, the athletic trainer Chellis Mike Chambers, Athletic Director T.P. Heard, swimming pool manager and intramural swimming coach William G. Hickey Higginbotham and LSU Law student Ed Laborde wanted to bring a live tiger to campus. They collected 25 cents from each student, raising $750—enough to purchase the tiger.
The students, along with Chambers, found a one-year-old, 200-pound tiger at the Little Rock Zoo. The group changed his named from Sheik to Mike, in honor of Chambers. Mike I assumed his role as the official mascot in late October 1936 and remained on campus for almost 20 years, even traveling with the team. Mike I died in June 1956, at nearly 21 years old. A tiger in the wild can live, on average, 8-10 years. A tiger in captivity, like Mike, can live 14-18 years.
In July 1956, the Mike the Tiger fund started on campus after Rep. Kenneth Deshotel of St. Landry endorsed the purchase of another tiger, if it could be named Mike II. Less than one year old, Mike II arrived on campus Sept. 28, 1956. He was introduced to the public the following day, the opening day of football season.
There’s an air of mystery surrounding Mike II. According to legend, less than a month after his arrival, Mike II died of pneumonia during a six-game losing streak and was secretly buried near the Mississippi River and replaced with another tiger. In either case, Mike II “officially” died in May 1958.
Mike III was born Nov. 26, 1957, and was introduced to the LSU community at the first home football game of the 1958 season—the national championship season. Mike III reigned as the mascot for 18 years. During his life, LSU won the national championship, along with three SEC championships in 1958, 1961 and 1970. The football team played in 13 bowl games during Mike III’s reign, winning eight of them. After the only losing season of his life, Mike III died in August 1976.
Later that month, Mike IV was donated to LSU by August A. Busch of Busch Gardens in Tampa, Fla. He was nearly 2 years old and weighed 450 pounds. In 1981, his home was being expanded to include a pool. He remained on campus for 14 years and retired to the Baton Rouge Zoo in 1990.
Later that year Mike V, originally named Stevie, was introduced to LSU fans at the Alabama vs. LSU basketball game in February. He was donated to LSU by Dr. Thomas and Caroline Atchison of the Animal House Zoological Park in Moulton, Ala.
Mike V participated in his first road trip, going to the Superdome for the LSU vs. Texas basketball game, in December 1991. Six years later, a new trailer for the tiger was donated by LSU fans Doug Guidroz and Rick Vallet. Mike V made his way to the Superdome again Jan. 1, 2002, for the LSU vs. University of Illinois football game in the Nokia Sugar Bowl.
The “I Like Mike” campaign began in 2001, raising money from fans, students and members of the LSU community. The money raised gave Mike V a new home, going from 1,100 square feet to more than 15,000 square feet in size. Mike V moved into his new habitat Aug. 27, 2005. Without realizing it, Mike V had stepped into one of the largest and finest tiger habitats in the nation, featuring lush planting, a large live oak tree, a waterfall, a stream and a swimming pond.
During his time as mascot, Mike V saw a football national championship, five baseball national championships and 23 track and field championships. He witnessed LSU athletics win 37 Southeastern Conference titles in his lifetime. Mike V died at age 17 on May 18, 2007.
Dr. Baker, started looking for a new tiger after Mike V’s passing. In July, he found Roscoe, now known as our beloved Mike VI. Already, during his brief tenure, Mike VI has witnessed both a football and baseball national championships for the Tigers.

http://www.lsu.edu/highlights/2010/07/mike.shtml
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#52
( This post was last modified: 11-16-2016, 01:24 AM by Kingtheropod )

Here is another weight of another one of the Mike tigers. The one posted above is Mike VI. This one is MIke IV.

At the age of 2 yrs, he weighed 450 pounds. And reached 480 pounds as an adult.


*This image is copyright of its original author


https://books.google.ca/books?id=SDRmQn_...e&q&f=true


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#53

Mangaluru: Tiger Raja dies - Pilikula loses one of its oldest members

Mangaluru, May 23: Tiger Raja, whose presence was admired by lacs of people who visited Pilikula Dr Shivaram Karanth Nisargadhama wildlife park during the last 12 years, breathed his last on Friday May 22. Raja was 21-year-old.


*This image is copyright of its original author


The animal died of heart attack. As against the normal life span of 18 years for tigers, Raja lived for 21 years. Tiger Raja had been shifted to Pilikula from Tiger Safari Centre in Shivamogga in the year 2003.
Tiger Raja weighed about 280 kg, and consumed an average of 10 kg meat and two kg chicken everyday. The tiger was robust and strong, but of late, its movements had been affected due to the affects of aging. It looked tired, and was under treatment since sometime. After the death of the tiger on Friday morning, its mortal remains were confined to flames.
Raja had gone wild once about 30 months back when he was suffering from illness. When Kushalappa, an attendant at the wildlife park, was applying medicine, the tiger had suddenly pounced upon him. Kushalappa had later died of bleeding.

http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp..._id=321530
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#54
( This post was last modified: 11-16-2016, 01:43 AM by Kingtheropod )

Authorities in Nepal said on Wednesday they have stopped feeding tigers in the country's only zoo for one day a week to keep them from piling on the pounds.
One of three fat cats at Jawalakhel zoo in the Nepali capital now weighs in at about 220 kg (485 pounds), having gained 40 kg on a diet of buffalo meat in just eight months.
The diet for "Kancha," which means "the youngest child," and two other Royal Bengal tigers is enforced in consultation with foreign zoos which also have a tight feeding regime for the endangered animals.




*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


"We don't give the tigers anything to eat on Saturdays except water," zoo official Binad Karmacharya said.
"The practice of feeding tigers for six days a week is good for their health."

An adult of the species can weigh up to a majestic 300 kg (660 pounds).

There are only about 4,000 tigers left in the wild worldwide, according to World Wildlife Fund (WWF) 2008 estimates. The survival of the wild cat is threatened due to loss of habitat, poaching and illegal trade in tiger parts.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/oukoe-uk-n...RY20081224
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#55

By Crandall, 1964 two captive tigers weighed about 500 pounds.


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#56


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"Hi Matthew,

Thank you for your email. We do know the weights on most of the cats. They are weighed with a portable scale...when they cooperate...lol. As for Hunter, he is our largest Tiger at the park. We has not been weighed for a while, but at one time it was nearly 600 lbs. Weights fluctuate a little throughout the year with seasonal change. Hope that helps Matthew. Great questions.

Have a great day!

Best regards,

Dean Powell
Out of Africa Wildlife Park"



*This image is copyright of its original author



Here is an email I got some time back about tiger 'Hunter' from Out of Africa wildlife Park. He weighed nearly 600 lbs.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#57
( This post was last modified: 11-16-2016, 03:30 AM by Pckts )

Amur Tiger..Gamin @ Marwell Zoo..some years ago...

Shared by Craig Kennion

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gamin from marwell wildlife died a few years ago, according to keepers he weighed around 43 stone (602lbs) ....man near him shows his size


Blank Park Zoo
Meet Max our new 6 year old, male tiger! Weighing in at just over 400 pounds, Max is easily identifiable from our smaller female tiger, Misha. Max came to Blank Park Zoo at the recommendation of the Amur tiger SSP, or Species Survival Plan. Since tigers are solitary animals, Max and Misha alternate days of being on exhibit. Come visit both tigers this weekend, Blank Park Zoo is open 9-5 everyday!

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#58
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2016, 09:15 AM by Kingtheropod )

The following are body measurements and weights of Lions and tigers in captivity in a Korean Zoo. If someone can please translate, that would be much appreciated.


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Canada Betty Offline
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#59


*This image is copyright of its original author

@Kingtheropod I guess, this is Everland Theme Park (South Korea) data?  
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#60

Correct. Not sure if the information is reliable. It could be. But it goes to show that the tigers there are not very big.

They also have a Siberian-Bengal mix which apparently weighs in at 260 kg.

My guess would be that the weights could be correct. But the body length measurements are not. A lion or tiger will never measure 230 or 250 cm in the body. Typically, the length of the body is 6 ft straight and the tail roughly 3 feet, with a total of roughly 9 ft. Slightly greater in case of tiger.
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