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Caprines (including goats and sheep)

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 10-31-2019, 11:18 AM by BorneanTiger )

Goats and sheep are among the ungulates classified under the subfamily of Caprinæ within the family of Bovidæhttps://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Bovidae/

Here are some news items I collected in the past week regarding caprines:

- Spain's capital city, Madrid, was flooded by a huge flock of sheep migrating to southern pastures: https://www.dw.com/en/madrid-deluged-by-...g-50908265

*This image is copyright of its original author


- In the northernmost Emirate of Ras Al Khaimah, a goat got stuck for 5 days on Jabal Jais, which is the highest mountain in the UAE, located in the Ru'us Al-Jibal (literally "Heads of Mountains"; the northwestern part of the Hajar Mountains, located in the Musandam Peninsula south of the Strait of Hormuz), but because the summit is in Oman, the highest peak in the UAE is that of Jabal Yibir or Jebel Al-Mebrah nearby. It then got rescued by Ras Al Khaimah Civil Defence: https://gulfnews.com/uae/watch-rak-rescu...2484745603https://www.thenational.ae/uae/watch-eme...n-1.930907 

Credit: RAK Civil Defence (Instagram)
https://www.instagram.com/p/B4Ph83tJJp9/

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#2
( This post was last modified: 10-31-2019, 11:51 PM by BorneanTiger )

Now for a caprine which would likely have been a prey of the Arabian leopard in the region of the Hajar Mountains, in what is now the border of the UAE and Oman in the Arabian Peninsula: the Arabian tahr (Arabitragus jayakari)http://www.catsg.org/fileadmin/fileshari...irates.pdf

The Arabian tahr is a species of tahrs, which are Asian caprines related to wild goats. The other species of tahrs are the Himalayan tahr (Hemitragus jemlahicus; from the southern flanks of the Himalaya Mountains in southern Tibet, northern India and Nepal) and the Nilgiri tahr (Nilgiritragus hylocrius): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar...0305000059

It lives on steep rocky slopes of the Hajar, at altitudes up to 1,800 m (5,900 ft) above sea level. It is also found in the area of Jebel Hafeet: https://web.archive.org/web/201803302114...606c3.aspxhttp://gulfnews.com/news/uae/environment...-1.1338797, https://www.thenational.ae/uae/environme...et-1.85597 

Being an endangered animal of the Hajar Mountains, and threatened with factors like overgrazing by domestic goats, it is protected by law in both the UAE and Oman. In 1973, efforts were planned to protect the Arabian tahr, and in 1975, it was granted in the Hajar Mountains. In 1980, a captive-breeding program was set up at the Omani Mammal Breeding Center to reintroduce captive-bred individuals back into the wild. Three institutions are now involved, one in Oman and two in the UAE, but many people seem to be unaware about the tahr's grave situations, leading to other conservation initiatives to focus on the publicity and educational campaigns to raise the animals' profile. In April 2009, the preserve of Wadi Wurayah preserve in the Emirate of Fujairah (where the leopard was rumoured to still occur) was set aside by royal decree in the Emirates for the protection of the tahr. Another place in the UAE, Sir Bani Yas in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, was also set up for its conservation: https://www.thenational.ae/uae/environme...et-1.85597, http://uae.panda.org/news/?163161/Arabia...protection, http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/environment...-1.2156104 

Stuffed tahr at the Natural History Museum of the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture in Al-Khuwair, Muscat, Oman: https://www.flickr.com/photos/24151047@N05/3179006397/

*This image is copyright of its original author


Captive tahr at Al Ain Zoo, Emirate of Abu Dhabi, the UAE; credit: Wajhuallah
*This image is copyright of its original author


At at Al Hefaiyah Mountain Conservation Centre in Kalba, Emirate of Sharjah, near the eastern coast of the UAE, within the Hajar Mountains (and the Arabian leopard is also in this centre):



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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 11-01-2019, 06:13 PM by BorneanTiger )

Painting by Paul de Vos from 1638–1640, in the Museo del Prado, Madrid, depicting 3 wolves attacking a lion (likely Asiaticor Eurasian) over a caprine: https://www.museodelprado.es/coleccion/o...b1160f02db 

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#4
( This post was last modified: 02-17-2020, 01:42 PM by BorneanTiger )

Barbary sheep or aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) by MJLepper:

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#5

Behzad J. Larry: " Portrait of a blue sheep.

Always a privilege when wild ungulates allow you this close- although this is still with a 600 f/4. It means conservation is working and the animals don’t consider humans as threats.
In the majority of places that we work in, wildlife conservation is critically tied to tourism. Tourism has allowed communities to earn sustainable incomes that are less reliant on precious natural resources. A family that lives in snow leopard habitat and earns a majority of their income by working in the tourism industry is less reliant on herds of livestock. This frees up grazing lands for wild ungulates, eventually boosting prey base numbers and allowing for higher snow leopard numbers.
It is crucial that these livelihoods are sustained. If employment begins to dry up in these remote frontiers, villages will be forced to return to viewing natural resources as a “free” resource- escalating the pressure on wild animals and slowly bringing back human-wildlife conflict.
When the world opens up for travel again- visit these areas and spend your dollars on the frontlines of conservation. If you’re already booked to go to a place where conservation and tourism work hand in hand, work with your tour operators to rebook your tours instead of canceling them. Every dollar that enters remote communities means conservation can be kept alive. "


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#6
( This post was last modified: 04-02-2020, 01:17 PM by BorneanTiger )

Kashmiri or Cashmere goats invadeLlandudno, a North Welsh seaside resort which got deserted because of COVID-19: https://www.news18.com/news/buzz/tribe-o...60353.htmlhttps://twitter.com/QuickTake/status/124...60353.html

Credit: AP

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#7

Behzad J. Larry: " Urial, or the Asiatic mouflon. A sub species of ovis orientalis, from which domestic sheep descend. "


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#8

Prickles the sheep found after seven years of self-isolation in Tasmania: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-austra...MZBb5eyw4g

Produced and edited by Isabelle Rodd:

*This image is copyright of its original author


A lone sheep that went missing after the 2013 Tasmanian bushfires has been found - and is a lot bigger.

Farmer Alice Gray and her family came across the ewe when having a barbecue on their farm. They captured her and named her Prickles, after her enormous, prickly fleece.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#9

" The Mountains Goat "





Just look at the third photo ! Very amazing...
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