There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 2 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Brown Bears (Info, Pics and Videos)

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

(11-16-2020, 08:49 PM)TheNormalGuy Wrote: Radio-collars and grizzly bears by Michael Morris, Parks Canada October 25, 2001

Radio Telemetry & Wildlife Tracking Introduction to radio-telemetry and wildlife tracking (Yellowstone Grizzly Project)

BIOLOGISTS CAPTURE, COLLAR GRIZZLIES NEAR YELLOWSTONE GENERAL | SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

18 grizzlies were captured ^


Quote:Radio-Collaring Bears

IGBST began radiocollaring grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) in 1975.  Since then, we have radio-monitored over 830 individuals for varying durations, typically for 2 to 3 years.  Over 100 individuals have been monitored during more than 5 different years.

Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

IGBST Annual Reports

IGBST Complete Publications 1974 - 2020

Grizzly Bear Mortality Database

Bear Caused Human Fatalities in the GYE, 1892 - Present

Contacts 

[I didn't include their phone numbers or emails, but they are available on the first link or by clicking on their name]

Frank van Manen

Supervisory Research Wildlife Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Mark Haroldson

Supervisory Wildlife Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Chad Dickinson

Biological Science Technician
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Mike Ebinger

Ecologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Bryn Karabensh

Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team



Craig Whitman

Biological Science Technician
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team


APPRAISING STATUS OF THE YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR POPULATION BY COUNTING FEMALES WITH CUBS-OF-THE-YEAR

POPULATION TREND OF THE YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR AS ESTIMATED FROM REPRODUCTIVE AND SURVIVAL RATES

DISTRIBUTION OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS DURING THE 1980S


YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR MORTALITY, HUMAN HABITUATION, AND WHITEBARK-PINE SEED CROPS

CANNIBALISM AND PREDATION ON BLACK BEARS BY GRIZZLY BEARS IN THE YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM, 1975-1990

FOOD-HABITS OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS, 1977-1987

MOVEMENTS OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS

REACTIONS OF GRIZZLY BEARS, URSUS-ARCTOS-HORRIBILIS, TO WILDFIRE IN YELLOWSTONE-NATIONAL-PARK, WYOMING

MORTALITY PATTERNS AND POPULATION SINKS FOR YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS, 1973-1985

MONITORING GRIZZLY BEAR POPULATION TRENDS

Size and Growth Patterns of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear [Blanchard]

By The Way, There are Yellowstone National Park Bear Annual Reports just like for wolves [free to view]

A lot of links, interesting to read when more time. But did you have some new weight information or does some of those links include such? I´m now in a bit hurry but will check later. But it would be nice if you could tell which link is about weights, because two first which I briefly opened seemed to be overall about radio collaring, no weights (?).
2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Canada TheNormalGuy Offline
Wolf Enthusiast
***
( This post was last modified: 11-16-2020, 09:17 PM by TheNormalGuy )

I will help a bit (for all in Yellowstone)

Wolf-cougar interactions Howard Quigley, Toni Ruth Hornocker Wildlife Institute 
Wolf-coyote interactions Bob Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf-elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Rose Jaffe Montana State University Firehole watershed 
Wolf stress hormones Scott Creel, Jennifer Sands Montana State University 
Wolf-scavenger relationships Wayne Getz, Chris Wilmers California State University, Berkeley 
Wolf-carnivore-human interactions Howard Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute Charles Schwartz Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team Dan Tyers U.S. Forest Service, Gallatin National Forest Gardiner District Kevin Fry Montana Dept. of Fish, Wildlife and Parks

^ 1999

Wolf–cougar interactions Howard Quigley, Toni Ruth Hornocker Wildlife Institute 
Wolf–coyote interactions Bob Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf–elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Rose Jaffe Montana State University Firehole watershed 
Wolf stress hormones Scott Creel, Jennifer Sands Montana State University 
Wolf–scavenger relationships Wayne Getz, Chris Wilmers; California State University, Berkeley; Bob Crabtree Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf howling John and Mary Theberge University of Waterloo, Canada

^ 2000

Wolf–cougar interactions Howard Quigley, Toni Ruth Hornocker Wildlife Institute 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson; Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team; Kerry Gunther YNP 
Wolf–elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Eric Bergman Montana State University Firehole watershed 
Wolf stress hormones Scott Creel, Jennifer Sands Montana State University 
Wolf–scavenger relationships Wayne Getz, Chris Wilmers; California State University, Berkeley; Bob Crabtree Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple Oregon State University

^ 2001

Wolf-cougar interactions Toni Ruth, Howard Quigley Hornocker Wildlife Institute/Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf-coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf-bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team 
Wolf-scavenger relationships Chris Wilmers, Wayne Getz; Bob Crabtree University of California at Berkeley; Yellowstone Ecosystem Studies 
Wolf-elk relationships—Firehole Watershed Bob Garrott, Eric Bergman Montana State University 
Wolf-pronghorn John Byers University of Idaho 
Wolf-willow Francis Singer USGS 
Wolf-aspen William Ripple Oregon State University 
Wolf-trophic cascades L. David Mech; Mark Boyce, Nathan Varley; Rolf Peterson USGS; University of Alberta; Michigan Technological University 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer Michigan Technological University 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray University of Idaho; Trent University 

^ 2002

Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth, Howard Quigley Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team 
Wolf–scavenger relationships Chris Wilmers, Wayne Getz; University of California at Berkeley; Bob Crabtree Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Eric Bergman Montana State University Firehole Watershed 
Wolf–elk calf mortality L. David Mech, Shannon Barber University of Minnesota 
Wolf–pronghorn John Byers University of Idaho 
Wolf–willow Francis Singer USGS 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple Oregon State University 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech; USGS; Mark Boyce, Nathan Varley; University of Alberta; Rolf Peterson Michigan Technological University 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer Michigan Technological University 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray University of Idaho; Trent University

^2003

Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, Kerry Gunther Bear Management Offi ce (YCR) 
Wolf–carnivore interactions Howard Quigley Beringia South 
Wolf–elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Matt Becker, Montana State University Madison–Firehole watershed Claire Gower 
Wolf–elk calf mortality P.J. White, L. David Mech, YCR, University of Minnesota Shannon Barber 
Wolf–pronghorn P.J. White, John Byers, YCR, University of Idaho 
Wolf–willow Evelyn Merrill, Francis Singer, University of Alberta, USGS, Roy Renkin, William Ripple, YCR, Oregon State University, David Cooper, Tom Hobbs, Colorado State University Don Despain 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple, Eric Larsen, Oregon State University, University Roy Renkin, Matt Kauffman of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, YCR, University of Montana 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech, Rolf Peterson, University of Minnesota, Nathan Varley, Mark Boyce, Michigan Technological University, Francis Singer University of Alberta, USGS 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer, John Vucetich, Michigan Technological University Rolf Peterson 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray Trent University

^ 2004

Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson, Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, Kerry Gunther Bear Management Offi ce (YCR) 
Wolf–carnivore interactions Howard Quigley Beringia South 
Wolf population genetics Robert Wayne, Bridgett vonHoldt University of California, Los Angeles 
Wolf–elk relationships in the Bob Garrott, Matt Becker, Montana State University Madison–Firehole watershed Claire Gower 
Wolf–elk calf mortality P.J. White, L. David Mech, YCR, University of Minnesota Shannon Barber 
Wolf–pronghorn P.J. White, John Byers YCR, University of Idaho 
Wolf–willow Evelyn Merrill, Francis Singer, University of Alberta, USGS, Roy Renkin, William Ripple, YCR, Colorado State University David Cooper, Tom Hobbs, Don Despain 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple, Eric Larsen, Oregon State University, University Roy Renkin, Matt Kauffman of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, YCR, University of Montana 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech, Mark Boyce, University of Minnesota, Nathan Varley, Rolf Peterson, Michigan Technological University, Dan MacNulty University of Alberta, USGS 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer, John Vucetich, Michigan Technological University Rolf Peterson 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray Trent University

^2005

Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson, Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, Kerry Gunther Bear Management Office (YCR) 
Wolf–carnivore interactions Howard Quigley Beringia South 
Wolf–scavenger interactions Chris Wilmers University of California, Davis 
Wolf population genetics Robert Wayne, University of California, Los Angeles Bridgett vonHoldt, Daniel Stahler 
Wolf–elk relationships, Bob Garrott, Matt Becker, Montana State University, YCR Madison–Firehole watershed Claire Gower, P.J. White 
Wolf–pronghorn P.J. White, John Byers, YCR, University of Idaho Kerey Barnowe-Meyer 
Wolf–willow Evelyn Merrill, Roy Renkin, University of Alberta, YCR, William Ripple, David Cooper, Oregon State University, Colorado State Tom Hobbs, Don Despain University, USGS 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple, Eric Larsen, Oregon State University, University of Roy Renkin, Matt Kauffman Wisconsin at Stevens Point, YCR, University of Montana 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech, Mark Boyce, USGS, University of Alberta, Michigan Nathan Varley, Rolf Peterson, Technological University, University of Dan MacNulty Minnesota 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer, John Vucetich, Michigan Technological University, Rolf Peterson, Dan MacNulty University of Minnesota 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray Trent University 
Wolf population genetics Robert Wayne, Daniel Stahler, University of California, Los Angeles Bridgett vonHoldt, John Pollinger 
Wolf diseases and parasites L. David Mech, Emily Almberg USGS, University of Minnesota 
Wolves, willows, and songbirds Andy Hansen, Lisa Baril Montana State University 
Wolf movements/dispersal Douglas McWhirter, L. David Mech, Wyoming Game and Fish, Mike Jimenez USGS, USFWS

^2006

Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth, Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson, Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Kerry Gunther Team, YCR Bear Management Office 
Wolf–carnivore interactions Howard Quigley Beringia South 
Wolf population genetics Robert Wayne, University of California at Los Angeles Bridgett vonHoldt, John Pollinger 
Wolf–elk relationships, Bob Garrott, Matt Becker, Montana State University Madison-Firehole Watershed Claire Gower, Shana Dunkley 
Wolf–pronghorn P.J. White, John Byers YCR, University of Idaho 
Wolf–willow Evelyn Merrill, Francis Singer, University of Alberta, USGS, Roy Renkin, Bill Ripple, YCR, Colorado State University David Cooper, Tom Hobbs, Don Despain, Nathan Varley 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple, Eric Larsen, Oregon State University, Roy Renkin, Matt Kauffman University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, YCR, University of Montana 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech, Mark Boyce, USGS, University of Alberta, Nathan Varley, Rolf Peterson, Michigan Technological University, John Vucetich University of Minnesota 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer, John Vucetich, Michigan Technological University Dan McNulty, Rolf Peterson 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray Trent University

^2007
Wolf–cougar interactions Toni Ruth Wildlife Conservation Society 
Wolf–coyote interactions Robert Crabtree, Jennifer Sheldon Yellowstone Ecological Research Center 
Wolf–bear interactions Charles Schwartz, Mark Haroldson, Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Kerry Gunther Team, YCR Bear Management Office 
Wolf–carnivore interactions Howard Quigley Beringia South 
Wolf population genetics Robert Wayne, University of California at Los Angeles Bridgett vonHoldt, John Pollinger 
Wolf–elk relationships, Bob Garrott, Matt Becker, Montana State University Madison-Firehole Watershed Claire Gower, Shana Dunkley 
Wolf–pronghorn P.J. White, John Byers Yellowstone Center for Resources (YCR), University of Idaho 
Wolf–willow Evelyn Merrill, Francis Singer, University of Alberta, U.S. Geological Roy Renkin, Bill Ripple, Survey (USGS), YCR, David Cooper, Tom Hobbs, Colorado State University Don Despain, Nathan Varley 
Wolf–aspen William Ripple, Eric Larsen, Oregon State University, Roy Renkin, Matt Kauffman University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, YCR, University of Montana 
Wolf–trophic cascades L. David Mech, Mark Boyce, USGS, University of Alberta, Nathan Varley, Rolf Peterson, Michigan Technological University, Dan MacNulty, John Vucetich University of Minnesota 
Wolf predation Tom Drummer, John Vucetich, Michigan Technological University Rolf Peterson 
Wolf survival Dennis Murray Trent University

^ 2008

Source : Yellowstone Wolf Project Annual Reports 2001-2008 [There is more but you get it]
"The Science of Life is a superb and dazzlingly lighted hall which may be reached only by passing through a long and ghastly kitchen". - Claude Bernard
2 users Like TheNormalGuy's post
Reply

Canada TheNormalGuy Offline
Wolf Enthusiast
***

(11-16-2020, 09:02 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-16-2020, 08:49 PM)TheNormalGuy Wrote: Radio-collars and grizzly bears by Michael Morris, Parks Canada October 25, 2001

Radio Telemetry & Wildlife Tracking Introduction to radio-telemetry and wildlife tracking (Yellowstone Grizzly Project)

BIOLOGISTS CAPTURE, COLLAR GRIZZLIES NEAR YELLOWSTONE GENERAL | SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

18 grizzlies were captured ^


Quote:Radio-Collaring Bears

IGBST began radiocollaring grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) in 1975.  Since then, we have radio-monitored over 830 individuals for varying durations, typically for 2 to 3 years.  Over 100 individuals have been monitored during more than 5 different years.

Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

IGBST Annual Reports

IGBST Complete Publications 1974 - 2020

Grizzly Bear Mortality Database

Bear Caused Human Fatalities in the GYE, 1892 - Present

Contacts 

[I didn't include their phone numbers or emails, but they are available on the first link or by clicking on their name]

Frank van Manen

Supervisory Research Wildlife Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Mark Haroldson

Supervisory Wildlife Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Chad Dickinson

Biological Science Technician
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Mike Ebinger

Ecologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team

Bryn Karabensh

Biologist
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team



Craig Whitman

Biological Science Technician
Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team


APPRAISING STATUS OF THE YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR POPULATION BY COUNTING FEMALES WITH CUBS-OF-THE-YEAR

POPULATION TREND OF THE YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR AS ESTIMATED FROM REPRODUCTIVE AND SURVIVAL RATES

DISTRIBUTION OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS DURING THE 1980S


YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEAR MORTALITY, HUMAN HABITUATION, AND WHITEBARK-PINE SEED CROPS

CANNIBALISM AND PREDATION ON BLACK BEARS BY GRIZZLY BEARS IN THE YELLOWSTONE ECOSYSTEM, 1975-1990

FOOD-HABITS OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS, 1977-1987

MOVEMENTS OF YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS

REACTIONS OF GRIZZLY BEARS, URSUS-ARCTOS-HORRIBILIS, TO WILDFIRE IN YELLOWSTONE-NATIONAL-PARK, WYOMING

MORTALITY PATTERNS AND POPULATION SINKS FOR YELLOWSTONE GRIZZLY BEARS, 1973-1985

MONITORING GRIZZLY BEAR POPULATION TRENDS

Size and Growth Patterns of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear [Blanchard]

By The Way, There are Yellowstone National Park Bear Annual Reports just like for wolves [free to view]

A lot of links, interesting to read when more time. But did you have some new weight information or does some of those links include such? I´m now in a bit hurry but will check later. But it would be nice if you could tell which link is about weights, because two first which I briefly opened seemed to be overall about radio collaring, no weights (?).


Didn't have time to check myself. The first link talk about some weight of canadian grizzlys.

The second talk about everything on telemetry, tracking, radio-collaring, etc.

Third link is about the most recent capture operations of yellowstone in Sept 2020. It do not give weights but it gives how many bears were captured (18) this year.

Then it the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study [A Larger Entity than The Yellowstone Wolf Project since it take accounts of the three states at least : Idaho, Wyo, MT i guess]

Then the links under the quote are from the small context page of that entity

After the contacts, is probably the lead expert in Yellowstone Bears as Doug Smith is with wolves. Bonnie M. Blanchard.

Finally, i suggests that there is Annual Reports for yellowstone bears as there are for wolves
"The Science of Life is a superb and dazzlingly lighted hall which may be reached only by passing through a long and ghastly kitchen". - Claude Bernard
2 users Like TheNormalGuy's post
Reply

Canada TheNormalGuy Offline
Wolf Enthusiast
***
( This post was last modified: 11-16-2020, 09:46 PM by TheNormalGuy )

Table 8. Grizzly bear capture information from the Cabinet-Yaak 1983-08. Multiple captures of a single bear during a given year are not included.  78 Weights 

CABINET-YAAK GRIZZLY BEAR RECOVERY AREA 2008 RESEARCH AND MONITORING PROGRESS REPORT (P.24-25)

There is even a summary for each individual bear !

Monitoring Summary of Each Adult Female Grizzly Bear [Cabinet Mountains Native Adult Female Bears] [P.32] [For example]

Table 11. Grizzly bears captured, observed, photographed, or genotyped by study personnel in the Yaak study, 1986-2008. [P.62]

In fact, I suggest reading [I didn't for times & interests reasons... for now] to every bear enthusiats this. It got everything !

Even That (below) :

Appendix Table 1. Known grizzly bear mortality in or near the Cabinet-Yaak recovery zone and the Yahk grizzly bear population unit in British Columbia, 1949-08. [p.73]
"The Science of Life is a superb and dazzlingly lighted hall which may be reached only by passing through a long and ghastly kitchen". - Claude Bernard
1 user Likes TheNormalGuy's post
Reply

Austria Maritimus77 Offline
New Member
*
( This post was last modified: 11-17-2020, 12:46 AM by Maritimus77 )

@TheNormalGuy 

Again thank you for your efforts, Normal Guy, you've sent me a document regarding the monitoring of Cabinet-Yaak grizzlies and the weight data extracted from that is higly valuable:


Mature male grizzlies (5y+, old ones were also included): ~194.2kg (~428.1lbs; n=19)
Mature female grizzlies (5y+, old ones were also included): ~126.2kg (~278.2lbs; n=15)

Fully grown/Prime male grizzlies (all boars being at least 9y of age and not too old; I excluded one male at 27y of age): ~217.4kg (~479.3lbs; n=8)
Fully grown/Prime female grizzlies (all sows being at least 7y of age and not too old; I excluded three females being well over 25y of age): ~141.9kg (~312.8lbs; n=11)

Largest male: 270kg (595.2lbs), 14y of age
Largest female: 171kg (377lbs), 11y of age



Full document is here: http://transbordergrizzlybearproject.ca/pdf/Kasworm%20et%20al%202009.pdf

@Shadow I saw that you asked for precise weight data in your previous post here; this might be from great interest for you then.
2 users Like Maritimus77's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

(11-16-2020, 11:23 PM)Maritimus77 Wrote: @TheNormalGuy 

Again thank you for your efforts, Normal Guy, you've sent me a document regarding the monitoring of Cabinet-Yaak grizzlies and the weight data extracted from that is higly valuable:


Mature male grizzlies (5y+, old ones were also included): ~194.2kg (~428.1lbs; n=19)
Mature female grizzlies (5y+, old ones were also included): ~126.2kg (~278.2lbs; n=15)

Fully grown/Prime male grizzlies (all boars being at least 9y of age and not too old; I excluded one male at 27y of age): ~217.4kg (~479.3lbs; n=8)
Fully grown/Prime female grizzlies (all sows being at least 7y of age and not too old; I excluded three females being well over 25y of age): ~141.9kg (~312.8lbs; n=11)

Largest male: 270kg (595.2lbs), 14y of age
Largest female: 171kg (377lbs), 11y of age



Full document is here: http://transbordergrizzlybearproject.ca/pdf/Kasworm%20et%20al%202009.pdf

@Shadow I saw that you asked for precise weight data in your previous post here; this might be from great interest for you then.

Well brown bears have variation in size depending of population. These seem to be a bit smaller than Yellowstone population what comes to weight then. Then again so small number weighed that not possible to make too big conclusions. 

In my country biggest wild bears have been well over 350 kg, biggest was 372 or 373 kg. A 300 kg bear is naturally always big, but not something extraordinary. Then again 791 at Yellowstone is clearly over 300 kg, it´s way larger than 881 which was weighed to be 280 kg so it´s quite safe to make that claim. Hopefully they could weigh 791 also one day, even though I do hope, that they wouldn´t radio collar it. I don´t like to see too many animals radio collared even though I understand, that doing it to some gives valuable information.
2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Canada TheNormalGuy Offline
Wolf Enthusiast
***

You know that only 10 % of them are collared ?
"The Science of Life is a superb and dazzlingly lighted hall which may be reached only by passing through a long and ghastly kitchen". - Claude Bernard
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

(11-17-2020, 01:31 AM)TheNormalGuy Wrote: You know that only 10 % of them are collared ?

I know that it´s small number which are collared, but exact percentage wasn´t in my knowledge. I wrote what I wrote because I dislike to see collared wild animals and the less there are is better, imo. So if asked from me I would say, that there are at least 9% too much in that number, 1/100 would be better and after some time it would be nice if 0%. They have already a lot of data to analyze. But they do it naturally and with good intentions, so I don´t judge collaring too strongly either. Anyway the less of animals are radio collared is better, imo. I understand it better with animals which are critically endangered and practically almost every individual is very important, like Siberian tigers and other species with only a few hundred individuals left.
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 11-22-2020, 04:52 PM by Shadow )

I don´t know if this has been shared before, but interesting study concerning body mass and chest girth of Ussuri brown bears living at Hokkaido, Japan. These same bears live also in Russia at same areas with Siberian/Amur tigers.

For some reason I hadn´t seen this before. It has measurements and weights from longer period of time and it confirms that some Ussuri brown bears can be truly huge. Everyone can imagine what it looks like, when a bear can be over 500 kg heavy, chest girth 2,5 meters and standing clearly over 2,5 meters tall. 

Heaviest bear in this study was 520 kg (1146,5 lbs), biggest chest girth 250 cm (8,2 ft or 8 ft 2,4 in) and biggest body length from tip of the nose to rump 260 cm (8,5 ft or 8 ft 6,4 in).

I read this study just briefly now, but I recommend to read all of it if any interest towards brown bears.

Some quotes:

"Morphometric measurements including body length, chest girth, and body mass were obtained from Hokkaido brown bears harvested from the
population for conflict management for the 22 years from August 1991 through December 2012 (n = 3,576; 2,347 males and 1,229 females). Body
length (cm) was measured from the nose tip to the anus. Chest girth (cm) was measured as the axillary girth just caudal to the scapula. Body
mass (kg) was determined by suspending bears from a spring scale or placing them on an electronic load scale. Data on the presence of
offspring, number of accompanying offspring, and estimated age of offspring of harvested bears was also collected from local government personnel
and hunters."

"Among bears with these measurements, body mass was 3-520 kg for males (n = 642) and 8-204 kg for females (n = 316), body length was 45-260 cm (n = 2,347) and
50-280 cm (n = 1,229), and chest girth was 23-250 cm (n = 2,307) and 28-240 cm (n = 1,218)."

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Ev...db9ba6eff2
2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

Brown bear nursing cubs. From Finland, summer 2016.




3 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

(11-22-2020, 01:06 AM)Shadow Wrote: I don´t know if this has been shared before, but interesting study concerning body mass and chest girth of Ussuri brown bears living at Hokkaido, Japan. These same bears live also in Russia at same areas with Siberian/Amur tigers.

For some reason I hadn´t seen this before. It has measurements and weights from longer period of time and it confirms that some Ussuri brown bears can be truly huge. Everyone can imagine what it looks like, when a bear can be over 500 kg heavy, chest girth 2,5 meters and standing clearly over 2,5 meters tall. 

Heaviest bear in this study was 520 kg (1146,5 lbs), biggest chest girth 250 cm (8,2 ft or 8 ft 2,4 in) and biggest body length from tip of the nose to rump 260 cm (8,5 ft or 8 ft 6,4 in).

I read this study just briefly now, but I recommend to read all of it if any interest towards brown bears.

Some quotes:

"Morphometric measurements including body length, chest girth, and body mass were obtained from Hokkaido brown bears harvested from the
population for conflict management for the 22 years from August 1991 through December 2012 (n = 3,576; 2,347 males and 1,229 females). Body
length (cm) was measured from the nose tip to the anus. Chest girth (cm) was measured as the axillary girth just caudal to the scapula. Body
mass (kg) was determined by suspending bears from a spring scale or placing them on an electronic load scale. Data on the presence of
offspring, number of accompanying offspring, and estimated age of offspring of harvested bears was also collected from local government personnel
and hunters."

"Among bears with these measurements, body mass was 3-520 kg for males (n = 642) and 8-204 kg for females (n = 316), body length was 45-260 cm (n = 2,347) and
50-280 cm (n = 1,229), and chest girth was 23-250 cm (n = 2,307) and 28-240 cm (n = 1,218)."

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Ev...db9ba6eff2

On interesting and a bit odd thing in this study is it, that when looking at figure 2 (Distribution of age - body mass...) there are so many big/very big male bears and then again some very young. When a 300 kg bear is based on chart maybe 2 years old it raises eyebrow. It can be of course that some age determinations have been incorrect. Very big number of bears included and maybe some errors because of it. 

Still even if some considering it, that some invalid information included this study has a lot of big bears weighing 300-400 kg and then 2-3 really big ones over 400 kg including that one 520 kg heavy. Based on this study it looks obvious, that these bears can really be said to be between of "normal" brown bears/grizzlies and Kodiak/Alaskan peninsula/Kamchatka peninsula bears in size. I don´t remember any other study with that many bears in between 300-400 kg what comes to "normal" brown bears and by this I mean brown bears with no access to rivers with salmon.
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB