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Bila Shaka coalition

Norway Pantherinae Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 01-10-2020, 02:52 PM by Pantherinae )

I thought it was time for the Bila Shaka coalition to get their own thread. This might be the most dominant coalition of the Masai Mara in the coming years. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

The 6 Bila Shaka Males - Status July 2018

This coalition of six now 4 year old Male Lions will likely change the lion dynamics in the Maasai Mara for the next up to 8 years!

It is rather unusual that 6 young males in a Lion Pride make it to independence. It is also rather unusual that all 6 survive the first years of their nomadic life after leaving their natal Pride. But if that happens, then the Lion Prides face rather difficult times.

Well, let’s repeat some quick background information first:

- born into the Moniko Pride; sons of Lolparpit & Olbarnoti
- 2 males were born in March 2014 and are brothers 
- 3 males were born in May 2014; two are brothers while I am not sure about the 3rd
- 1 male was born in September 2014

They were not yet 3 years old when they arrived and for some odd reason the 2 Marsh Pride Males, Rafiki & Karibu, tolerated them in their territory. The 3 Kichwa Males crossed the River and chased them around several times, but they never stayed as the Marsh Pride Females had left their territory to keep their 9 cubs safe from the intruding males, so the Kichwa Males always returned to their Prides in the northern Triangle.

The 6 Bila Shaka Males stayed being “happy campers” and grew in size & confidence. At some point they turned tables on the Kichwa Males and chased them back across the River. The males started to mate with the different satellite Marsh Pride Females and Spot and Rembo gave birth to cubs, hence both lost their litters. Rembo’s cubs were killed by one member of the coalition not being aware the cubs have been sired by one of his partners. That is always a serious risk with large coalitions of Male Lions and can turn out being utterly destructive for Lion Prides.

Yaya bonded with the males and gave birth to 2 cubs in April this year and these cubs are doing very well. Yaya’s 2 older daughters have been accepted by the males and mating will start pretty soon them being almost 3 years old now. Latest news is that Spot has given birth to a new litter and more cubs will arrive as at least Little Red and Kabibi have also mated with members of the coalition.

The big question a year ago was – will these 6 males stay in the Musiara & Bila Shaka areas and become real Pride Males to start a new chapter in the chronicles of the Marsh Pride, or will they move on to take over other Prides?

In June this year 5 of the males were moving around a lot while 1 male reportedly preferred to hang out with Little Red & Spot. These 5 males covered a lot of ground incl. the Greater Windmill Area, the southern parts of the Mara North Conservancy, as well as Topi Plains Pride territory. Obviously they were looking for prey, but also for the scattered Marsh Pride Females and probably for more/other Females to mate with.

Expectedly the Topi Plains Pride, neighbours of the Marsh Pride, was up for grips after the demise of Lipstick and being left with only 1 Pride Male. And basically that is what started to happen when I was there in June. Blackie left the Pride and members of the Bila Shaka Coalition started to court some of the Topi Plains Females. It will be a challenge for the Topi Girls to keep their youngsters out of the firing line.

Latest information indicate that members of the Bila Shaka Coalition have started to move further east towards the Double Crossing Area and one male was seen mating with one of the Enkoyonai Pride Females. There are 8-9 adult females in this Pride and only 2 aging Pride Males, Lolparpit & Olbarnoti, are defending their several youngsters. These Old Warriors are also the fathers of the Bila Shaka Males.

So the question this year is – will the Bila Shaka Males stay with the Marsh Pride and Topi Plains Pride or will they also take over the Enkoyonai Pride from their fathers? Well and if that happens – will they leave the Marsh Pride and/or the Topi Plains Pride for good? Or will this coaliton split up in 2 or 3  

The #6pack all together for ID reference

Thank you to all the local guides in the magical Mara who helped name them. 

Can't wait to see their lives unfold!

Meanings and thoughts behind their names below:

- Chongo (Swahili) meaning 'bad eye', for obvious reasons

- Kiok (Maa) meaning 'ear', due to his mismatched ears

- Baba Yao (Swahili) meaning 'their father', his dominance in the mating hierarchy brought a new lease of life to Bila Shaka and the Marsh area 

- Kibogoyo (Swahili) meaning 'toothless', due to one of his upper canines missing

- Doa (Swahili) meaning 'spot', due to his left eye spot

- Koshoke (Maa) meaning the one with the big belly

Pics from Sept 2018 in and around Topi Plains and Bila Shaka Photos and history Lucy Johnston

Hope everyone can help make this an interesting thread.
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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The Bila shakas where in a fight with Sala’s Boys coalition over the rekero pride. 

Baba Yao was caught and attacked by three of the Sala’s boys on Saturday and where badly injuried. 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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Some pictures of Doa. The largest of the Bila Shakas.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Here is Doa infront, with Baba Yao and Kibogoyo in the back.
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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#4


*This image is copyright of its original author

Chongo.
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-10-2020, 02:57 PM by Pantherinae )

Here is a lioness from the Topi Pride very aggressive because she has small cubs
The two male lions here are first Chongo and the male coming in later is Koshoke. 



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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Online
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#6

(01-10-2020, 02:40 PM)Pantherinae Wrote: I thought it was time for the Bila Shaka coalition to get their own thread. This might be the most dominant coalition of the Masai Mara in the coming years. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

The 6 Bila Shaka Males - Status July 2018

This coalition of six now 4 year old Male Lions will likely change the lion dynamics in the Maasai Mara for the next up to 8 years!

It is rather unusual that 6 young males in a Lion Pride make it to independence. It is also rather unusual that all 6 survive the first years of their nomadic life after leaving their natal Pride. But if that happens, then the Lion Prides face rather difficult times.

Well, let’s repeat some quick background information first:

- born into the Moniko Pride; sons of Lolparpit & Olbarnoti
- 2 males were born in March 2014 and are brothers 
- 3 males were born in May 2014; two are brothers while I am not sure about the 3rd
- 1 male was born in September 2014

They were not yet 3 years old when they arrived and for some odd reason the 2 Marsh Pride Males, Rafiki & Karibu, tolerated them in their territory. The 3 Kichwa Males crossed the River and chased them around several times, but they never stayed as the Marsh Pride Females had left their territory to keep their 9 cubs safe from the intruding males, so the Kichwa Males always returned to their Prides in the northern Triangle.

The 6 Bila Shaka Males stayed being “happy campers” and grew in size & confidence. At some point they turned tables on the Kichwa Males and chased them back across the River. The males started to mate with the different satellite Marsh Pride Females and Spot and Rembo gave birth to cubs, hence both lost their litters. Rembo’s cubs were killed by one member of the coalition not being aware the cubs have been sired by one of his partners. That is always a serious risk with large coalitions of Male Lions and can turn out being utterly destructive for Lion Prides.

Yaya bonded with the males and gave birth to 2 cubs in April this year and these cubs are doing very well. Yaya’s 2 older daughters have been accepted by the males and mating will start pretty soon them being almost 3 years old now. Latest news is that Spot has given birth to a new litter and more cubs will arrive as at least Little Red and Kabibi have also mated with members of the coalition.

The big question a year ago was – will these 6 males stay in the Musiara & Bila Shaka areas and become real Pride Males to start a new chapter in the chronicles of the Marsh Pride, or will they move on to take over other Prides?

In June this year 5 of the males were moving around a lot while 1 male reportedly preferred to hang out with Little Red & Spot. These 5 males covered a lot of ground incl. the Greater Windmill Area, the southern parts of the Mara North Conservancy, as well as Topi Plains Pride territory. Obviously they were looking for prey, but also for the scattered Marsh Pride Females and probably for more/other Females to mate with.

Expectedly the Topi Plains Pride, neighbours of the Marsh Pride, was up for grips after the demise of Lipstick and being left with only 1 Pride Male. And basically that is what started to happen when I was there in June. Blackie left the Pride and members of the Bila Shaka Coalition started to court some of the Topi Plains Females. It will be a challenge for the Topi Girls to keep their youngsters out of the firing line.

Latest information indicate that members of the Bila Shaka Coalition have started to move further east towards the Double Crossing Area and one male was seen mating with one of the Enkoyonai Pride Females. There are 8-9 adult females in this Pride and only 2 aging Pride Males, Lolparpit & Olbarnoti, are defending their several youngsters. These Old Warriors are also the fathers of the Bila Shaka Males.

So the question this year is – will the Bila Shaka Males stay with the Marsh Pride and Topi Plains Pride or will they also take over the Enkoyonai Pride from their fathers? Well and if that happens – will they leave the Marsh Pride and/or the Topi Plains Pride for good? Or will this coaliton split up in 2 or 3  

The #6pack all together for ID reference

Thank you to all the local guides in the magical Mara who helped name them. 

Can't wait to see their lives unfold!

Meanings and thoughts behind their names below:

- Chongo (Swahili) meaning 'bad eye', for obvious reasons

- Kiok (Maa) meaning 'ear', due to his mismatched ears

- Baba Yao (Swahili) meaning 'their father', his dominance in the mating hierarchy brought a new lease of life to Bila Shaka and the Marsh area 

- Kibogoyo (Swahili) meaning 'toothless', due to one of his upper canines missing

- Doa (Swahili) meaning 'spot', due to his left eye spot

- Koshoke (Maa) meaning the one with the big belly

Pics from Sept 2018 in and around Topi Plains and Bila Shaka Photos and history Lucy Johnston

Hope everyone can help make this an interesting thread.
they're big boys too haven't checked on them in a while
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Croatia Tr1x24 Offline
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#7

@Pantherinae Great work!

Im not following lions of Masai Mara that much, so i have a question, will vets and rangers help Baba Yao with his injuries?? If im not mistaken they helped Lolparpit when he was attacked by Fig Tree males..
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Russian Federation Nyers Online
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(01-10-2020, 04:42 PM)Tr1x24 Wrote: @Pantherinae Great work!

Im not following lions of Masai Mara that much, so i have a question, will vets and rangers help Baba Yao with his injuries?? If im not mistaken they helped Lolparpit when he was attacked by Fig Tree males..

according to Lucy Johnson:

Essentially this happened last Saturday morning, he has been seen since then. Last confirmed guide/camp sighting was Tuesday. It is said he has been assessed and no treatment required as he is moving around.
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-10-2020, 05:35 PM by Pantherinae )

@Tr1x24
As @Nyers said appareantly he didn’t need treatment.
However do you think wild lions should get treated after a fight? I’m not so sure it’s the right thing to do. Although I love lions and hope they are doing well, I still feel like we should let nature take its course. 

*If an animal is caught in a snare or is poisoned etc I think we should help and treat the animals, but not after a natural occurrence. 

*This image is copyright of its original author
 
Baba Yao.
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United States 239Pu Offline
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#10




5 of the 6 boys together May 2018





Kibogoyo of the Bila-shaka lion coalition crosses the plains o the mara one morning before giving a mighty roar and joining a second lion from the same coalition, Kiok ... May 2019
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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Such a unique looking male lion, Koshoke. 
Here he takes over the kill from the lionesses. 



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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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Baba Yao breaks the spine of a young male lion. Very brutal footage, but shows the brutal life of these cats. 



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Croatia Tr1x24 Offline
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(01-10-2020, 05:32 PM)Pantherinae Wrote: @Tr1x24
As @Nyers said appareantly he didn’t need treatment.
However do you think wild lions should get treated after a fight? I’m not so sure it’s the right thing to do. Although I love lions and hope they are doing well, I still feel like we should let nature take its course. 

*If an animal is caught in a snare or is poisoned etc I think we should help and treat the animals, but not after a natural occurrence

Well as i understand, Masai Mara policy is to help lions after any injuries, no matter the cause. 

Kruger, however has the policy to help lions only if injured by " human causes".

My opinion is somewhere in between, no, i dont think lions injured in a fight or hunt should be treated, because thats unfair to the lion/pray who defeat/defend from that lion. Ofc if lion is mortaly wounded i am for the eutanisation, theres no need for animal to suffer. 

But i do think that lions should be treated from natural diseases like mange, TB etc. We own that to this lions, who bring money to the reserves etc.

Helping for injuries caused by humans is not even debate.
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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I agree, with you here. 
Injuries caused by humans should be treated, while injuries from natural occurrence should be left alone. 

Yes diseases is something different imo. That should be treated as that can spread to other lions and damage the population.
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Greece Mohawk4 Offline
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#15

Doa my favourite from the coalition and Jua Topi pride girl
Photo  Aly Rashid


*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Majingilane’ watchmen who patrol the night, marching with intent, never altering their course...
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