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Bigcats News

Roflcopters Offline
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Tiger attack in Bardiya kills one

BARDIYA: A person died on the spot when a spotted tiger attacked him in Bardiya National Park on Tuesday.
The deceased has been identified as mahout of the park Mangru Tharu, 45, of Thakurbaba Municipality, Bardiya. Chief Conservation Officer at Bardiya National Park Ananath Baral said that the wild animal attacked Tharu while he was collecting fodder for elephants of the park.


According to staffers of the national park, the tiger had attacked the man and abandoned his body as three other persons made noises when the tiger attacked. Tigers have been attacking people in the national park of late.
Earlier, six persons had lost their lives after the spotted tiger attacked them outside the park.

A version of this article appears in print on 06 Nov, 2019 of The Himalayan Times.

https://thehimalayantimes.com/nepal/tiger-attack-kills-one/
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BorneanTiger Offline
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Indian leopard leaps onto 2 bikers, but misses them by a few inches, and this is a viral video: 



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BorneanTiger Offline
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A lion was temporarily used to guard a house in Nigeria, like a dog: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-lions-i...3#pid94803
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Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-21-2019, 02:12 PM by Rishi )

Tiger Numbers 2019 – Devil In Disguise


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The new number of wild tigers has been revised to 4642, based on available data estimates, said Chris Slappendel the founder of the IATA Tiger News Platform.

The new numbers are compiled from the latest national tiger surveys, IUCN data and realistic estimations from reliable sources. The overall increases attributed to conservation achievements in India, Nepal, Bhutan, Russia & Thailand. However, the rising numbers distract from what is really happening on ground level.

“Since 2010 we see the same things happening as before. Agriculture (palm oil), mining and encroachment are leading to destruction of tiger habitat. International operating crime syndicates are inducing the Chinese demand for tigers and tiger products, and use tiger farms to deliver the supply while fuelling the demand for tigers in the wild. Unsustainable tourism is expanding with more exploitation of tigers in captivity and more unwanted situations in and around tiger reserves,” said Frederic Geffroy, founder of Planete Tigre.
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Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-28-2019, 06:38 PM by Rishi )

Safe corridor for tigers in Tiger State: Madhya Pradesh plans 10 additional protected areas
According to the forest department, the state has six tiger reserves, 10 national parks and 25 wildlife sanctuaries in Madhya Pradesh, which are poorly connected to each other resulting in increase in human-animal conflict.


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  • Sanctuaries getting ready in Dhar, Burhanpur, Harda, Indore, Narsinghpur, Sagar, Sehore, Sheopur, Mandla & Omkareshwar districts
  • These sanctuaries will be developed between tiger reserves in forest areas with no settlements or obstruction. 
On the initiative of State Kevan Minister Umang Singhar, new sanctuaries are being built to allow safe movement of tigers & prevent human-animal conflict in the state. The development of sanctuaries at Dhar, Burhanpur, Harda, Indore, Narsinghpur, Sagar, Sehore, Sheopur, Mandla and Omkareshwar will not only provide a safe corridor for tigers to move from one tiger reserve to another but will also bring tigers living in those fringe forests, under protection.

According to official information, these 10 sanctuaries will act as satellites to the tiger reserves & aid their dispersal. Those degraded forests will also benefit from the habitat redevelopment.

However, the total average area for each sanctuary being almost 1500 sq.km has met some opposition. The forest minister said that they cannot overlook the concerns raised by people and have therefore, decided to reduce the area of these sanctuaries by one-third to save local tribals & forest dependant communities from displacement. Some of the boundaries of the sanctuaries are to be redrawn in such a way that it doesn’t affect any villages.

Sources:
https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/...K_amp.html
https://dbpost.com/madhya-pradesh-safe-c...n-10-dists
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Luxembourg Spalea Online
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I just come to discover this video but I don't know where to put it. This female leopard was caught near a village and was about to be released into the farther and safer savannah. But even with the best intentions there are some things no to do.





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BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-03-2019, 08:25 PM by BorneanTiger )

In 2014, a Southwest African lion came in the news for travelling 1,300 km (807 miles) between Angola and Namibia, then earlier this year, we had the tragic tale of a tiger that apparently migrated 300 km (186.4 miles) from Ratapani Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh to the eastern part of Gujarat State, and dying before it could even reach the Asiatic lion's territory, now we have this: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article...-mate.html, https://news.sky.com/story/tiger-complet...a-11876730, https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world...29771.html, https://gulfnews.com/world/asia/india/ti...1.68208427, https://www.livemint.com/news/india/a-ti...10797.htmlhttps://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/y...34271.htmlhttps://www.ndtv.com/offbeat/tipeshwar-t...te-2142391

BBC: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-50626744

"A tiger has undertaken the longest walk ever recorded in India, travelling some 1,300km (807 miles) in five months.
   

Experts believe the two-and-a-half-year-old male is possibly in search of prey, territory or a mate. The tiger, which is fitted with a radio collar, left its home in a wildlife sanctuary in the western state of Maharashtra in June. It was then tracked travelling back and forth over farms, water and highways, and into a neighbouring state. So far, the tiger has come into conflict with humans only once, when it "accidentally injured" one person who was part of a group that entered a thicket under which it was resting. The tiger, called C1, was one of three male cubs born to T1, a female tiger in Tipeshwar wildlife sanctuary, home to 10 tigers in Maharashtra state. He was fitted with a radio collar in February and continued to roam the forests until the onset of monsoon rains to "find a suitable area to settle". The animal left the sanctuary at the end of June, and since then has travelled through seven districts in Maharashtra and the neighbouring state, Telangana. At the weekend, he was located in another wildlife sanctuary in Maharashtra.

Communication fears
Wildlife officials say the big cat has not travelled in a "linear manner". He is being tracked through GPS satellite information every hour and has been recorded in more than 5,000 locations in the past nine months. "The tiger is possibly looking for territory, food and a mate. Most of the potential tiger areas [in India] are full and new tigers have to explore more," Dr Bilal Habib, a senior biologist with the Wildlife Institute of India, told the BBC. The tiger hid during the day and travelled in the night time, killing wild pigs and cattle for food. Dr Habib confirmed the one accidental injury to a man who entered the thicket where the tiger was resting, but said there had been no serious conflict with humans. "People don't even know that this tiger is travelling in the backyard," he said. However, wildlife officials say the tiger may need to be captured and relocated to the nearest forest to "avoid any untoward accidents", forest officials said. They also fear they will lose communication with the animal in the near future as the battery of the radio collar has been drained by 80%.

Credit: Tippeshwar Wildlife Sanctuary
   

Tiger numbers have increased in India, but their habitat has shrunk and prey is not always plentiful, say experts. Every tiger requires a breeding prey population of 500 animals in its territory to ensure a "food bank", say experts."

That Angolan lion: https://www.theportugalnews.com/news/rar...data/32633
   
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Germany Jeffrey Offline
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A Tiger has been found dead near Bihada mine. compartment no. 293. Manegaon Beat. Ramtek Range. Nagpur district,. It been assumed that It had unfortunately fallen into a deep well from which he couldn't escape.


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United States Pckts Offline
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Gaurav Kalbhor
Sad news coming from Pench.
Tiger carcass found near khawasa. Suspected to be Sharmili. Cant believe she and her cubs rocked the entire summer of 2019. Was really waiting for her young cubs.
Images as received on Whats App.

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Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2019, 11:06 AM by Rishi )

GOI maps 32 tiger corridors,₹350 Crores allocated for 2020
The central govt. has mapped tiger corridors within & outside protected areas across the country, and developed a conservation master plan for the national animal, which includes a strategy to streamline infrastructure projects with mandatory inclusion of safe passages.
December, 2019

Map of Tiger Corridor (January 2010): Panthera Foundation
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Union minister of state for environment Babul Supriyo released the details of the plan in Rajya Sabha on Monday. The plan has been formulated keeping in view the all India tiger estimation results released in July that showed there were 2,967 big cats in the country and that there has been a 6% annual increase in their numbers since 2006.
The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), under the Union environment ministry, has published a document, titled Connecting Tiger Populations for Long-term Conservation, in collaboration with the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Dehradun. The document maps 32 major corridors and details the tiger conservation plan under the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972.

“These maps have been developed since 2014 and have been constantly updated over the past five years,” said NTCA’s additional director general, Anup Nayak. “We are currently collating information on how these corridors are being utilised by tigers. These maps are further being modified with microlevel landscape details and we are exploring the possibility of including more corridors by next year.”

WII said that these corridors have been assessed & developed based on annual tiger estimation exercises over 15 years based on preliminary big cat dispersal information.

The NTCA has developed a three-level strategy to manage negative human-tiger interactions under the Centre’s long-term tiger conservation program. The strategy involves providing material, logistical and financial support to tiger reserves to deal with big cats dispersing out of protected areas. It also seeks to ensure safe dispersal of tigers by limiting habitat interventions (facilitating dispersal to other rich habitat areas), and to follow the NTCA’s standard operating procedures to deal with human-animal and livestock conflict after dispersal.
Nayak said that development has to be balanced with conservation. “The basic purpose of identifying these 32 corridors is to streamline linear infrastructure projects with mandatory inclusion of mitigation measures for safe passage of tigers,” said Nayak. Nayak added that the process of sensitising agencies such as the railways, highway operators etc is already underway.

Amounts of Rs. 370 crores, Rs. 345 crores and Rs. 350 crores were allocated during the financial years 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 respectively, while an amount of Rs. 350 crores has been allocated for the current financial year 2019-2020 under the Centrally Sponsored Scheme of Project Tiger. in 2019. Maharashtra (Rs 37 crore) has got the maximum funds, followed by Madhya Pradesh (Rs 29 crore) and Assam (Rs 21 crore).

Experts said that the corridors cover almost all major areas witnessing tiger movement. “The Centre, however, has to improve the speed of relocating villagers from core areas of tiger reserves, and also enhance rehabilitation of hunting communities. Enforcement measures are well covered but need to be further strengthened,” said Wildlife Protection Society of India’s programme coordinator, Tito Joseph.
The list of tiger corridors includes three across Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh bordering Nepal in Shivalik Hills and Gangetic Plains. As many as 11 of them are across Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha, and Andhra Pradesh. Eight of the corridors are located across Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, and the remaining 10 are in Assam, Arunachal Pradesh and West Bengal.

The corridors across states are important as big cats travel long distances. A tiger travelled 1,300 km over two states (Maharashtra and Telangana), six districts and four wildlife sanctuaries in about 150 days exploring a new area to set up its territory, according to the Maharashtra forest department study based of the data from radio-collaring? “This is the largest recorded distance travelled by any tiger in India identifying and validating the presence of tiger corridors inside and outside protected forest areas,” said Ravikiran Govekar, field director, Pench Tiger Reserve.


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Sources:
https://pib.gov.in/PressReleseDetailm.aspx?PRID=1594508
https://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-go...804108/amp
https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/...L_amp.html
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peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2019, 12:02 PM by peter )

RISHI

Interesting information. In southeast Asia (Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam), however, tigers are completely gone. The forests are still there, but they're empty. And they're loaded with snares. Steel snares. Millions of them.

Malaysia and Thailand still have tigers, but the total number most probably is below 400. The reports about Burma (Myanmar) also are alarming. There could be some tigers left in remote regions, but chances are they won't last long.

If I was involved in tiger protection in India, Nepal and Bhutan, I would be very wary.
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Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2019, 02:49 PM by Rishi )

(12-12-2019, 11:57 AM)peter Wrote: RISHI

Interesting information. In southeast Asia (Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam), however, tigers are completely gone. The forests are still there, but they're empty. And they're loaded with snares. Steel snares. Millions of them.

Malaysia and Thailand still have tigers, but the total number most probably is below 400. The reports about Burma (Myanmar) also are alarming. There could be some tigers left in remote regions, but chances are they won't last long.

If I was involved in tiger protection in India, Nepal and Bhutan, I would be very wary.

Forests with steel snares can be easily clensed with metal detectors. It's time-consuming, meticulous work but not overly complicated... The landmines or unexploded ordnance littered over Vietnam, parts of Cambodia & Laos however pose another level of challenge.

Situation in Myanmar too might be less dire than previously thought (#79), Thailand too is facing the odds well.
Indonesia & Malaysia are lagging behind, nor are they doing much about the increasingly alarmed situation.
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peter Offline
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(12-12-2019, 12:31 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(12-12-2019, 11:57 AM)peter Wrote: RISHI

Interesting information. In southeast Asia (Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam), however, tigers are completely gone. The forests are still there, but they're empty. And they're loaded with snares. Steel snares. Millions of them.

Malaysia and Thailand still have tigers, but the total number most probably is below 400. The reports about Burma (Myanmar) also are alarming. There could be some tigers left in remote regions, but chances are they won't last long.

If I was involved in tiger protection in India, Nepal and Bhutan, I would be very wary.

Forests with steel-snares can be easily clensed with metal detectors. It's time - consuming, meticulous work but not overly complicated... The landmines or unexploded ordnance littered over Vietnam, parts of Cambodia & Laos however pose another level of challenge.

Situation in Myanmar too might be less dire than previously thought (#79), Thailand too is facing the odds well.
Indonesia & Malaysia are lagging behind, nor are they doing much about the increasingly alarmed situation.

I recently posted about the number of snares in Southeast Asia in the tiger-extinction thread. Experts think there are many millions in Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Malaysia combined. Most of them will never be found.

According to those who know, tigers are gone in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. In Malaysia the situation is so alarming, that some are considering a very different policy regarding poachers:

https://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/save-malayan-tiger-poachers-could-be-shot-sight

I do not doubt the intentions and efforts of those involved in conservation, but it's a fact the commitment at the level of politics often is lacking. The only exceptions are Russia, India, Nepal, Thailand and Malaysia. In Russia, India and Nepal, the number of tigers is slowly increasing. In Thailand, however, tigers are struggling. In Malaysia and, in particular, Sumatra, they seem to be on their way out.
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