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United States paul cooper Online
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(09-15-2017, 02:01 AM)Pckts Wrote: @paul cooper 
Too far off to distinctly make out stripes and spots clustered together easily give the misconception of stripes.
I'm not exactly sure what you're saying in the 2nd part of your statement, but leopards have white on their inner limbs, neck and stomach.

That is a Leopard, there is no doubt about it, the photo is bad so it's hard to make out color but it looks a bit light, almost like a strawberry leopard but you'd need to see a much clearer image before you could determine that.


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I mean, I do see spots on the leopards body and upper arms tho. But i thought it was weird how i see stripes on the legs of the leopard.
There's a skeleton choking on a crust of bread

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United States tigerluver Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-15-2017, 06:14 AM by tigerluver )

Interesting photo. My gut says leopard. The tail is very long and even though there is something like stripes on that back leg, I'd think that one would continue across the rest of the body if those stripes were more than a camera artifact.

Edit: I found the stripes on the inner leg in the photo below (leopard on right).


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United States paul cooper Online
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(09-15-2017, 06:08 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Interesting photo. My gut says leopard. The tail is very long and even though there is something like stripes on that back leg, I'd think that one would continue across the rest of the body if those stripes were more than a camera artifact.

Edit: I found the stripes on the inner leg in the photo below (leopard on right).


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Wow ok, it makes sense now they seem to have closer spots that makes it look like stripes.
There's a skeleton choking on a crust of bread

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India sanjay Offline
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definitely a Leopard
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Kazakhstan to reintroduce wild tigers after 70-year absence
Sandra Laville
Friday 8 September 2017 08.52 BST

Project supported by WWF is likely to take many years and involves creation of nature reserve and restoration of forest

Siberian tigers. The first tigers in Kazakhstan will be introduced in 2025 at the earliest. Photograph: David Lawson/WWF UK

*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild tigers are to be reintroduced to Kazakhstan 70 years after they became extinct in the country.

The animals will be reintroduced in the Ili-Balkhash region in a project that involves the creation of a nature reserve and the restoration of a forest that is part of the animal’s historical range.

If successful, Kazakhstan will be the first country in the world to bring wild tigers back to an entire region where they have been extinct for nearly half a century. Previous relocation projects have only been considered in existing tiger habitats, such as in reserves in India.

Poaching and habitat loss has decimated the wildlife on which wild tigers once fed, including the kulkan, or wild donkey, and bactrian deer, both native to central Asia. The animals will be reintroduced to the nature reserve to provide enough food for the tigers when they are relocated from elsewhere in Asia.

The project, which is being supported by WWF, is likely to take many years. The landscape has to be prepared and the wildlife they feed on reintroduced before the first tigers are brought in in 2025 at the earliest.

Igor Chestin, the director of WWF-Russia said: “Thanks to years of close collaboration between Kazakhstan and Russian conservation experts, we have now identified the best possible territory in Ili-Balkhash for the restoration of a thriving wild tiger population.

“Our continued cooperation will be key in the successful creation of a new reserve, the restoration of rare native species and, in a few years’ time, achieving an
unprecedented trans-boundary relocation of wild tigers to central Asia.”

Since the beginning of the 20th century, wild tigers have lost more than 90% of their historical range, including in central Asia (modern Turkey and Iran to north-west China). Wild tigers completely disappeared from Kazakhstan in the 1940s due to poaching and the loss of territory, WWF said.

There were thought to be about 100,000 wild tigers at the beginning of the 20th century. Now there are about 3,900, but it is hoped the Kazakhstan project will play a key role in increasing tiger range and populations.

Askar Myrzakhmetov, the minister of agriculture, said: “Kazakhstan is moving along the path of green development. We are honoured to be the first country in central Asia to implement such an important and large-scale project, that not only will bring wild tigers back to their ancestral home but also protect the unique ecosystem of the Ili-Balkhash region.”

Ekaterina Vorobyeva, the director of WWF-Russia’s Central Asia programme, said there was hard work ahead to make the area ready. “That means tackling poaching and illegal activities, having well-trained and equipped rangers, thriving prey populations and engaged local communities.”
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(09-17-2017, 04:03 AM)Ngala Wrote: Kazakhstan to reintroduce wild tigers after 70-year absence
Sandra Laville
Friday 8 September 2017 08.52 BST

Project supported by WWF is likely to take many years and involves creation of nature reserve and restoration of forest

Siberian tigers. The first tigers in Kazakhstan will be introduced in 2025 at the earliest. Photograph: David Lawson/WWF UK

*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild tigers are to be reintroduced to Kazakhstan 70 years after they became extinct in the country.

The animals will be reintroduced in the Ili-Balkhash region in a project that involves the creation of a nature reserve and the restoration of a forest that is part of the animal’s historical range.

If successful, Kazakhstan will be the first country in the world to bring wild tigers back to an entire region where they have been extinct for nearly half a century. Previous relocation projects have only been considered in existing tiger habitats, such as in reserves in India.

Poaching and habitat loss has decimated the wildlife on which wild tigers once fed, including the kulkan, or wild donkey, and bactrian deer, both native to central Asia. The animals will be reintroduced to the nature reserve to provide enough food for the tigers when they are relocated from elsewhere in Asia.

The project, which is being supported by WWF, is likely to take many years. The landscape has to be prepared and the wildlife they feed on reintroduced before the first tigers are brought in in 2025 at the earliest.

Igor Chestin, the director of WWF-Russia said: “Thanks to years of close collaboration between Kazakhstan and Russian conservation experts, we have now identified the best possible territory in Ili-Balkhash for the restoration of a thriving wild tiger population.

“Our continued cooperation will be key in the successful creation of a new reserve, the restoration of rare native species and, in a few years’ time, achieving an
unprecedented trans-boundary relocation of wild tigers to central Asia.”

Since the beginning of the 20th century, wild tigers have lost more than 90% of their historical range, including in central Asia (modern Turkey and Iran to north-west China). Wild tigers completely disappeared from Kazakhstan in the 1940s due to poaching and the loss of territory, WWF said.

There were thought to be about 100,000 wild tigers at the beginning of the 20th century. Now there are about 3,900, but it is hoped the Kazakhstan project will play a key role in increasing tiger range and populations.

Askar Myrzakhmetov, the minister of agriculture, said: “Kazakhstan is moving along the path of green development. We are honoured to be the first country in central Asia to implement such an important and large-scale project, that not only will bring wild tigers back to their ancestral home but also protect the unique ecosystem of the Ili-Balkhash region.”

Ekaterina Vorobyeva, the director of WWF-Russia’s Central Asia programme, said there was hard work ahead to make the area ready. “That means tackling poaching and illegal activities, having well-trained and equipped rangers, thriving prey populations and engaged local communities.”
Great News, hope it happens soon
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Ngala :

About #1265: for once we can read some good news... Let us hope this will effectively happen.
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