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Bigcats News

United States Pckts Offline
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A tiger killed two people, a man and women, in Corbett.

"I hear that the incident happened somewhere between Ramnagar and Haldwani. The tiger picked up a man and woman who were working near a canal."
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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Dereck and Beverly Big Cat Conservation

An update on Dereck and Beverly.
Thank you once again for all the incredible support that has been received from all over the world. Dereck and Beverly are immensely touched by all your wishes.
After a very long and tough week, we think that a corner has finally been turned when Beverly told her Doctors that she needed to heal fast because she has rhinos to move. This is a statement typical of her undeniable strength and one which warmed our hearts because we knew she would never give up easily and that her first thoughts as usual were for the wildlife she has spent her life protecting.
It seems a lifetime ago since the night when Dereck and Beverly were walking to dinner in their camp in the Okavango and a buffalo charged them from the darkness. Dereck suffered some bone fractures but Beverly was seriously injured, with the horn causing extensive damage. Dereck’s actions that night certainly saved her at that point. Four operations later, and the revelation that major arteries, organs and her spine were all miraculously missed, it’s become clear that Beverly has fought fiercely and finally seems to be out of immediate danger.
There is obviously a lot of recovery still to come, however she has walked, she has had sutures removed and she asks after the wellbeing of others rather than herself.
We are thrilled with the progress so far and optimistic that this remarkable spirit of Beverly’s will see her through the healing process still to come.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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Disgusting mismanagement by the forest department leading to the death of the "alleged" man killer.
He was already tranq'd mind you at this point... he later died from internal injuries for obvious reasons.

Kanwar Deep Juneja

This is how they killed the Corbett Tiger!!! And was he really a man eater also! These forest team is no less cause their lack of expertise and crude tactics killed the tiger!







Woman, father-in-law killed by tiger near Corbett national park

*This image is copyright of its original author

http://www.hindustantimes.com/cities/wom...nnq7M.html
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Really absurd!!
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States Pckts Offline
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More videos here

Sarosh Lodhi


More videos surfacing from the messed up rescue op. There was no way this tiger could have made it. The points to be noted are -
- he did not make kills outside his territory ( by going in villages)
- he was given the man eater tag within one hour of his attack.
- the rescue team was not alone during the op, there was a big mob present at the spot
- why wasn't the area cleared of mob. the mob strength could easily be more than a 100 men, definitely a stressful/ traumatic sight for a sedated animal.
- the tiger was pinned under the heavy machine
- why no mahouts were called for, what was the hurry, who suggested usage of heavy machinery.
- if the highly educated vets couldn't gauge proper dosage of tranquilliser ( as suggested by someone from the rescue team , trying to justify use of JCB ) , how could the pressure of loader be gauged by the operator.

https://www.facebook.com/sarosh.lodhi/vi...832461560/

https://www.facebook.com/sarosh.lodhi/vi...832561560/


*This image is copyright of its original author

"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Polar Offline
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Imagine if that tiger wasn't tranquilized...

Would've easily flipped the tactor on the other side!
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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Italy Ngala Offline
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Four years on, missing male tiger of Tadoba reserve spotted
 Updated: Mar 21, 2017 17:19 IST
Snehal Fernandes
Hindustan Times

Eight-year-old Ookhan was spotted 80-100 km away near Pathri, a village close to Ghodazhari area.(Aditya Dhanwate)

*This image is copyright of its original author

Four years after wildlife observers said they lost track of a male tiger in the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR) at Chandrapur near Nagpur, an image of Ookhan was captured via a camera trap far away from his home early this month.

Eight-year-old Ookhan was spotted 80-100 km away near Pathri, a village close to Ghodazhari area, where safaris recently began. The area and falls under the Brahmapur division adjoining TATR.

The stripe pattern of Ookhan from a 2012 photograph matched with tiger’s image recorded by the camera trap on March 2 this year. Stripe patterns are unique to every tiger.

The photo shows the strip pattern of the tiger captured in 2012 and 2017. (Aditya Dhanwate)

*This image is copyright of its original author

“It is a known fact that male cubs generally travel farther away from their mother’s territory to establish their own. This prevents inbreeding among tigers,” said Jignesh Patel, a naturalist, and who has been visiting TATR for six years. “It was assumed that Ookhan was killed by a dominant male tiger or was poached.”

Chief conservator of forests and field director GP Garad, however, refused to confirm that Ookhan was sighted.

“Who is saying this? I don’t know (about it), and won’t be able to confirm whether it was here (TATR) or not,” Garad told HT. “This was not recorded in Tadoba during my period. As a field director, I have no idea since I took charge in 2014. In 2012, there was no tiger missing, no poaching.”

Born in 2009 to Yeda Anna (also known as Crooked Tail) and mother Tara (or Nakkatti) in the Moharli range, Ookhan separated from his mother in 2011. Moving 15-20 km away, the two-year-old was regularly seen at Vasant Bhandara — his father’s territory. Vasant Bhandara was dominated by two older male tigers Katezhari (better known as Tyson) and Gabbar, making it difficult for Ookhan to establish his territory.

Local forest rangers and wildlife enthusiasts said Ookhan was last spotted in February 2013 while crossing the road near the Kumbhi tank in TATR.

“Tigers keep changing their territory. Tiger management is important; their population should not get reduced,” said Garad.

Ookhan’s 80 to 100 km journey, said Patel, is by no means an achievement since tigers have been recorded to travel more than 600 km.

“But the way TATR is set, surrounded by villages and fields on all sides, it is difficult for a tiger to survive outside the park. In the absence of the usual prey animals, they mostly have to kill livestock, which puts them on villagers’ radar, and there is a constant threat from poachers. For a tiger to survive cunningly against all odds is nothing short of a miracle,” said Patel, adding that Ookhan at eight years is in his prime. “This could mean that the area where he was sighted could be his territory. More photographs from the area are required to prove this.”
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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India Rishi Offline
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(03-21-2017, 09:14 PM)Ngala Wrote: Four years on, missing male tiger of Tadoba reserve spotted
 Updated: Mar 21, 2017 17:19 IST
Snehal Fernandes
Hindustan Times

Eight-year-old Ookhan was spotted 80-100 km away near Pathri, a village close to Ghodazhari area.(Aditya Dhanwate)

*This image is copyright of its original author

Four years after wildlife observers said they lost track of a male tiger in the Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR) at Chandrapur near Nagpur, an image of Ookhan was captured via a camera trap far away from his home early this month.

Eight-year-old Ookhan was spotted 80-100 km away near Pathri, a village close to Ghodazhari area, where safaris recently began. The area and falls under the Brahmapur division adjoining TATR.

The stripe pattern of Ookhan from a 2012 photograph matched with tiger’s image recorded by the camera trap on March 2 this year. Stripe patterns are unique to every tiger.

The photo shows the strip pattern of the tiger captured in 2012 and 2017. (Aditya Dhanwate)

*This image is copyright of its original author

“It is a known fact that male cubs generally travel farther away from their mother’s territory to establish their own. This prevents inbreeding among tigers,” said Jignesh Patel, a naturalist, and who has been visiting TATR for six years. “It was assumed that Ookhan was killed by a dominant male tiger or was poached.”

Chief conservator of forests and field director GP Garad, however, refused to confirm that Ookhan was sighted.

“Who is saying this? I don’t know (about it), and won’t be able to confirm whether it was here (TATR) or not,” Garad told HT. “This was not recorded in Tadoba during my period. As a field director, I have no idea since I took charge in 2014. In 2012, there was no tiger missing, no poaching.”

Born in 2009 to Yeda Anna (also known as Crooked Tail) and mother Tara (or Nakkatti) in the Moharli range, Ookhan separated from his mother in 2011. Moving 15-20 km away, the two-year-old was regularly seen at Vasant Bhandara — his father’s territory. Vasant Bhandara was dominated by two older male tigers Katezhari (better known as Tyson) and Gabbar, making it difficult for Ookhan to establish his territory.

Local forest rangers and wildlife enthusiasts said Ookhan was last spotted in February 2013 while crossing the road near the Kumbhi tank in TATR.

“Tigers keep changing their territory. Tiger management is important; their population should not get reduced,” said Garad.

Ookhan’s 80 to 100 km journey, said Patel, is by no means an achievement since tigers have been recorded to travel more than 600 km.

“But the way TATR is set, surrounded by villages and fields on all sides, it is difficult for a tiger to survive outside the park. In the absence of the usual prey animals, they mostly have to kill livestock, which puts them on villagers’ radar, and there is a constant threat from poachers. For a tiger to survive cunningly against all odds is nothing short of a miracle,” said Patel, adding that Ookhan at eight years is in his prime. “This could mean that the area where he was sighted could be his territory. More photographs from the area are required to prove this.”

Fabulous news!!! Maybe "Jai" is alive somewhere as well...  Sad
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Austria Brehm Offline
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With increase in numbers, tigers fight it out for space in Ranthambore reserve


"Sisters, Lightening and Arrow Head, cannot stand the sight of each other. In October, 2016 they fought thrice for supremacy in Ranthambore’s lake area, with Arrow Head having the upper hand. Lightening moved to the peripheral area, Amma Ghati.

Territory divided, they still bay for each other’s blood. It’s a war out in the wilderness of Ranthambore where tiger numbers have exploded in the last few years resulting in increasing territorial disputes, which — unlike tiger human conflict — mostly goes unreported."




http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news...lw7HK.html

But the more interesting part is this graphic:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Corbett is now the reserve with the highest tiger density, i really missed something. Question is, why corbett isnt turning to a battleground with its 210 tigers like kaziranga and nowadays ranthambore?
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United States Pckts Offline
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(03-21-2017, 10:24 PM)Brehm Wrote: With increase in numbers, tigers fight it out for space in Ranthambore reserve


"Sisters, Lightening and Arrow Head, cannot stand the sight of each other. In October, 2016 they fought thrice for supremacy in Ranthambore’s lake area, with Arrow Head having the upper hand. Lightening moved to the peripheral area, Amma Ghati.

Territory divided, they still bay for each other’s blood. It’s a war out in the wilderness of Ranthambore where tiger numbers have exploded in the last few years resulting in increasing territorial disputes, which — unlike tiger human conflict — mostly goes unreported."




http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news...lw7HK.html

But the more interesting part is this graphic:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Corbett is now the reserve with the highest tiger density, i really missed something. Question is, why corbett isnt turning to a battleground with its 210 tigers like kaziranga and nowadays ranthambore?

I don't think we know, Corbett sightings are much rarer, same with Kaziranga. I'm sure infighting in corbett is equally as high as any other high density park.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-22-2017, 09:03 AM by Rishi )

(03-21-2017, 10:24 PM)Brehm Wrote: But the more interesting part is this graphic:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Corbett is now the reserve with the highest tiger density, i really missed something. Question is, why corbett isnt turning to a battleground with its 210 tigers like kaziranga and nowadays ranthambore?
@Pckts here's why..

Good effort but the graphic is not as cool as it looks!!!
There's a lot of misinformation here...The journalist did only a basic research & cooked up a confusing report!!!..

1. There is NO driest & hottest, the whole "Western India Tiger Landscape" has similar dry-deciduous vegetation & climate.
*This image is copyright of its original author


2. They have taken the numbers too literally...right from the internet.

U see, only Bandipur TR area is stated right (but they missed that it is a part of a 5000sq.km landscape & shares half of its tigers with adjoining Nugu, Mudumalai, Nagarhole (Rajiv Gandhi NP), Wayanad, Malai-Mahadeshwara (marked "Talaimalai" after administrative district name)..

*This image is copyright of its original author

Rest are all wrong... 
Kaziranga National Park is 460sq.km...But the Tiger Reserve combined with the adjoining Sanctuary is 858sq.km.
http://natureconservation.in/kaziranga-n...l-updated/
(I'm even totally ignoring the Karbi-Anglong hills landscape to the south..)

Similarly, corbett NP is about 500sq.km. (part of core area) but the total Tiger Reserve is more than 1500sq.km!!! Also the tigers live in adjoining Lansdowne & Ramnagar Reserve Forests as well.




Edit: Plus the tigers are NOT EVENLY-DISTRIBUTED...A small region of inviolate forest, might be prime territory with 1tiger/10sq.km but not all of it!!!..
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Brazil strana Offline
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Also the number of tigers in Kaziranga (163 ) seems  to be completely wrong. This is from all Assam ( Kazi + Orang + Nameri + Manas + Dibru Saikhowa )
 By the way, tigers numbers are also increasing in Terai ( 71 more tigers identified ) , Manas , Ranth, Satpura, Melghat, Tadoba ( 88 tigers, 16 more than last census; it is strange that only Matkasur is usually seen there ) .
So, I really hope that in all India census  next year the numbers can reach 2800 + . I think that all deaths of last year ( and this year too ) happened because the tiger numbers have increased : more tigers, more dead tigers, it is to be expected.
 Unfortunately, I have heard that South India reserves , specially Bandipur, are facing an acute water crisis, let´s hope for a good monsoon this year  !!!
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Austria Brehm Offline
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Thanks for clarification. The numbers indeed are missleading considering kazirangas size increase (i knew i rembered right, but was unsure) and corbetts core + buffer area combined.

Still, overall its an interesting article to read and its highlighting the need of intact buffer areas + corridors around the core zone of ranthambore. Kailadevi sanctuary is actually a mess according to the article. However, feel free to correct, if this should be also wrong.

@Rishi Just one sidenote, but from the map on point 1, how many reserves are there if ranthambore is left out? The whole western landscape does have for sure comparable climate, but ranth in particular seems to be the only reserve with a considerable number of tigers. If some nearby reserves in the centre are also reaching such high tempereatures than its anyway totally made up, but Rajasthan as India's hottest state actually does make it sound not so wrong to me.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-25-2017, 02:34 PM by Rishi )

(03-22-2017, 05:01 PM)Brehm Wrote: Thanks for clarification. The numbers indeed are missleading considering kazirangas size increase (i knew i rembered right, but was unsure) and corbetts core + buffer area combined.

Still, overall its an interesting article to read and its highlighting the need of intact buffer areas + corridors around the core zone of ranthambore. Kailadevi sanctuary is actually a mess according to the article. However, feel free to correct, if this should be also wrong.

@Rishi Just one sidenote, but from the map on point 1, how many reserves are there if ranthambore is left out? The whole western landscape does have for sure comparable climate, but ranth in particular seems to be the only reserve with a considerable number of tigers. If some nearby reserves in the centre are also reaching such high tempereatures than its anyway totally made up, but Rajasthan as India's hottest state actually does make it sound not so wrong to me.

Nah..Sariska (150km to the north-northwest) is much more scorched... It's right on the edges of Thar desert!!!..
Dry-deciduous greenery percentage in Ranth is also more than Thorny...

Anyways...You will see the Protected Areas marked in the map...Of that Mukundara is a designated Tiger Reserve (no tigers since '70s though, they intend to reintroduce).
Kuno-Palpur is said to be in the best condition right now (Ranth offshoot tigers are already eyeing it)..& if they manage to elbow out the "soon to arrive" lion-pairs, before they can familiarise & settle...Asiatic Lion Reintroduction Project is done for!!!
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Austria Brehm Offline
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Sariska and Ranth are actually comparable throughout the year temperature wise. It depends on month, ranth is a bit hotter in the first and last quartal of the year, but sarsika hits most of the time higher temperatures in the second and third for example.

https://www.indianholiday.com/wildlife-i...mbore.html


https://www.indianholiday.com/wildlife-i...imate.html

But thinking about the repopulation of Sariska with tigers since the last 5 years, it should've been considered by the author anyways. However, this discussion gets a taste of hairsplitting imo, i think we should return B2T.

According to Kuno i agree, its already discovered and occupied by tress passing tigers. I still think it should be used as corridor to ranth for tiger conservation. And Sariska should (or other reserves isolated from other tiger reserves) be probably considered as new lion sanctuary. For that matter, the tigers there have to be relocated back to ranth, but tigers were whiped out there more than a decade ago anyway...
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