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Bear Size ~

Sully Offline
Ecology & Rewilding
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#1

Post your pics or vids of some of the biggest bears ever seen. If you have further info on the pics or vids please share. My first thread so if I've done anything wrong go easy on me XD


*This image is copyright of its original author
Fragmented info on this bear. “Dr. Pete Clark took this exceptional bear while hunting with me last fall. Certainly over 11 ft. in his prime, but still well over 10 feet, Boone & Crockett 29 12/16ths. Fellow guide Troy Kitchel captured it on video. Killing shot was at 4 yards!”
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Sully Offline
Ecology & Rewilding
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#2

The barell is supposed to be 2ft
*This image is copyright of its original author
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Sully Offline
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#3


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Malaysia JawaRumbia Offline
Big Cat Enthusiasts
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#4

Nice thread you have here...

By the way here's a video about weighing the biggest bear in Finland..




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Sully Offline
Ecology & Rewilding
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#5

(11-04-2015, 05:32 AM)JawaRumbia Wrote: Nice thread you have here...

By the way here's a video about weighing the biggest bear in Finland..






Thanx Jawa or Lol cat. And that bear is quite the robust specimen, thanx for sharing! Lol
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India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
#6

http://www.findmeahunt.com/blog/2011/01/...zzly-bear/
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India brotherbear Offline
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#7
( This post was last modified: 11-23-2015, 01:19 PM by brotherbear )

The grizzly in post #2 was in Fairbanks, Alaska. That 55 gallon drum is 3 feet tall.  http://shaggygod.proboards.com/thread/452/big-grizzly
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#8

Jeff Watson's big buddy, and he is 1200 pounds of raw power.








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India brotherbear Offline
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#9
( This post was last modified: 12-12-2015, 01:56 AM by brotherbear )

http://www.outdoorhub.com/stories/2014/1...n-hunters/ 
 
Bears are some of nature’s most fascinating creatures. I am sure there are many reasons why so many people have more than just a passing interest in them. Who hasn’t been lying in a tent at night when a strange noise suddenly brings the thought of a bear to the front of their consciousness? There are four species of bears in North America, and all of them have killed people; some more than others. That’s just one of the reasons why people get an adrenaline surge when they encounter one.
Most bears, of course, won’t hurt you. But they could, and that’s enough. Black bears are the most common bear by far, and a tiny fraction of encounters with black bears have ended with an injury. Contrast that to the polar bear, most of which live out their entire lives without ever seeing a human. To a polar bear, anything that moves is potential food. Both subspecies of the brown bear, the Kodiak and grizzly, are dangerous creatures, though not so much as the polar bear.
In some areas, these bears get really big—like as-big-as-a-Volkswagen big. That interests hunters who crave the difficulty of taking the premier specimens of any given species, and it interests those who just thing big bears are amazing creatures. We all seem to be fascinated by things that get really big.
The biggest bears have some things going for them. First, they have to live in near-perfect habitat; second, they need to grow old enough to reach peak size; and third, to become a world-record size, they must hit the DNA lottery. They need the right genetic code to grow to outsized proportions. Let’s look at the biggest bears of all four species that have been shot by hunters or found and entered into the Boone and Crockett Records. We can learn some things about where the largest of each of these species can be found.
Boone and Crockett scores bears by measuring the size of the skull, an accurate way of judging a bear’s size. Some bears may weigh more than others, but generally the bears with the biggest heads are the biggest bears. The score is simply the greatest length added to the widest portion measured in sixteenths of inches.
 
Kodiak bear

Kodiak bears (also known as Alaskan brown bears) are a subspecies of brown bear and are only found on the Kodiak Archipelago in Alaska. The biggest brown bears come from Kodiak Island itself. While bears are found on many islands off Alaska and the Alaskan peninsula, 17 of the top 25 Alaskan brown bears were taken from Kodiak. The world record was bagged by Roy Lindsley in 1952. Its score is 30 12/16. It’s the largest-scoring bear of any speices known. The skull is now owned by the Los Angeles County Museum. The largest specimens of brown bears commonly weigh more than half a ton, which is a predator that will make the knees of the most seasoned hunter shake.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Larry Fitzgerald poses with the largest grizzly bear taken by a hunter. It was bagged in 2013 near the Totatlanika River, Alaska.


The second- and third-place bears were also taken on Kodiak. Erling Hansen took one in 1961 that scored 30 11/16 and Fred Henton took one in 1938 that scored 30 9/16. Henton’s bear was the world’s record until Lindsley’s harvest overtook it in 1952. The most recent bear in the top 25 was bagged by Thomas Stago in Uyak Bay, Alaska in 2012. 
 
Grizzly bear

Grizzly bears are another subspecies of brown bear. But while Alaskan brown bears live on the coast, grizzlies live inland and over time have adapted to the the unique environments they live in. These adaptations have led to smaller bears. North American brown bears that aren’t shot in coastal areas are considered grizzlies, and their recorded sizes show it. Seventeen of the top 25 grizzlies were taken in, you guessed it, Alaska. Seven were taken in British Columbia and the remaining one was taken in the Yukon.

The largest Grizzly bear skull on record was not taken by a hunter, but was found dead near Lone Mountain, Alaska by Gordon Scott in 1976. It scored 27 13/16. The largest taken by a hunter, a 27 6/16 giant, was shot by Larry Fitzgerald in 2013 on the Totatlanika River, Alaska. In third place is Rodney Debias’ 27 3/16 bear shot on the Unalakleet River Alaska in 2009.
Big grizzly bears are being shot every year in Alaska and British Columbia, and a new world’s record could show up at any time. 
 
Black bear hunting is popular across the United States and Canada. About half of US states offer black bear hunting, and with an expanding population nationwide, five states have added bear hunting seasons in the last decade. There are more to come. Alaska ranks high in producing giant black bears as well, led by the islands in the Pacific Ocean just off the state’s southeastern coast, but the most consistent producer of giant black bears is not what you would think. Twelve of the top 25 black bears in the record book came from Pennsylvania. Wisconsin comes in second. As stated earlier, a big bear is the result of two main aspects: excellent habitat and age. Both states have a mix of farm crops and big woods that create ideal bear habitat.


*This image is copyright of its original author


The melon-headed bear in this picture is the largest black bear taken by a hunter. Robert Christian shot it in Monroe County, Pennsylvania in 2011.



Wisconsin and Pennsylvania take a very different approach to their bear hunting, but these approaches seem to lead to the same end. Wisconsin issues a very limited number of bear tags to hunters. It can take a decade to draw a tag in Wisconsin, but the success rates for those with tags is fairly high because both hounds and baiting are allowed.
Contrast that to Pennsylvania, which issues tags for anyone that wants one for a small fee. But because the most successful methods of hunting bears (hounds and baits) are not allowed, most bears in the state are shot incidentally by deer hunters. To some degree, bears are shot when large groups of hunters get together and make large drives through blocks of timber. The success rate normally runs around two percent for bear hunters in Pennsylvania. 
Despite all this, the largest black bear skull on record came from a dead bear found in Sanpete County, Utah in 1975. That animal scored 23 10/16. The largest bear killed by a hunter was shot by Robert Christian in Monroe County, Pennsylvania in 2011; it scored 23 9/16. The second-largest found dead was discovered in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania and given to the state Game Commission in 1987. It scored 23 7/16. 
 
Polar bear

The polar bear is the largest land carnivore in the world. A lot of bears have a nasty reputation, but polar bears back it up. More people have been killed and eaten by polar bears than by all other bears combined. The opportunity to hunt a huge polar bear has been turned upside down in the past couple decades. That’s not to say that you can’t shoot a huge polar bear because all adult polar bears are huge by bear standards, but the areas that produce the biggest ones are off-limits except to indigenous Alaskans.
All of the top 25 white bears and more than 90 percent of all Boone and Crockett record book bears have been shot out of coastal Alaska. Most of them have been shot out of Kotzebue, with the Diomede Islands area a distant second place. Only indigenous natives are allowed to hunt these bears. It stands to reason that subsistence hunters are not looking for bears with big skulls, and if they shot one of record-book size, the odds that it would be entered would be low. All of the top 50 in the record book were taken before 1968. The world record, taken by Shelby Longoria, was taken off the coast of Kotzebue in 1963. It scored 29 15/16. Will there ever be a 30-inch polar bear entered in the record books? Not in the foreseeable future. 
There are, however, opportunities to hunt smaller polar bears. In fact, the polar bear population has expanded in the past decade across its range. Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut offer excellent bear hunting, but they rarely reach the Boone and Crockett minimum of 27 inches. There is a catch in this scenario, too: non-Canadian residents are not allowed to take their bears across the border into the United States or any other country. You can hunt a polar bear and take photos (and even have it mounted), but you can’t bring it home. That’s a significant roadblock to many people who have an interest in hunting this bear, which can only be taken in the most harsh and unforgiving conditions imaginable.

There has been significant effort by several parties and organizations to change this odd situation. Time will tell if it ever changes. In the meantime, there are a lot of bears in storage and on display at sporting goods stores, airports, and museums that may someday be allowed out of the country so they can go home to the hunters who bagged them.

Follow Bernie’s bowhunting adventures on his blog,bowhuntingroad.com.
Images courtesy Boone and Crockett Club

 
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India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
#10

The flaw in the Boone and Crockett scoring system is the fact that the largest skull does not always mean the largest bear. The same holds true for bear tracks. 
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India brotherbear Offline
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#11
( This post was last modified: 12-12-2015, 02:11 AM by brotherbear )

http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/fiel...ken-alaska 
 
It’s official. Last Friday the Boone and Crockett club announced a grizzly bear taken by Larry Fitzgerald in 2013 near Fairbanks, Alaska will enter the record books as the largest ever taken by a hunter, and the second largest grizzly skull in the world.
Boone and Crockett collects data from trophy animals either found or harvested by hunters to help gauge wildlife management practices. A press release from the organization says it ranks bears according to skull size and Fitzgerald’s bear measured 27 6/16 inches—just 7/16 of an inch smaller than the reigning world-record skull found in Alaska in 1976.
“One would think that a relatively accessible area, with liberal bear hunting regulations to keep populations in line with available habitat and food, would be the last place to find one of the largest grizzly bears on record,” said Richard Hale, chairman of the Boone and Crockett Club's Records of North American Big Game committee.
Hale said the Alaska Department of Fish and Game liberalized hunting regulations in the area Fitzgerald hunted to help manage an overpopulation of grizzlies, and while baiting is legal, Fitzgerald stalked his bear after spotting it during a moose hunt.
"Grizzly populations are doing well across all their ranges. That includes populations in the Lower 48 states that are currently federally protected under the Endangered Species Act, but will soon be up for delisting and management authority turned over to the watchful eye of state wildlife managers," said Hale.
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India brotherbear Offline
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#12
( This post was last modified: 12-12-2015, 01:05 PM by brotherbear )

http://gothunts.com/north-carolina-recor...confirmed/ 
 
It took five years to do it, but the state of North Carolina finally confirmed Billy Walkowiak’s 2004black bear as the 17th largest North Carolina record black bear ever taken in NC. 
 
Billy’s North Carolina record black bear had an official weight of 647 pounds and was estimated to be nine years, nine months old. The record bruin was shot on a dog hunt in Hyde County, NC, a hotbed for big bears in the state.

North Carolina grows BIG bears, much bigger than the black bears in Canada. The state record AND world record heaviest black bear is an 880 pound bear taken in 1998 with a shotgun, also on a hound hunt, in Craven County. Coastal North Carolina bears are larger on average than mountain bears. During the 2003-2004 season, North Carolina produced 48 bears in excess of 500 pounds at the coast but only six bears weighing more than 500 pounds in the mountains. Probably because of the agriculture in the coastal areas. North Carolina does not allow baiting, but planting a food plot and hound hunting are both legal. Bears love sweet corn, turnips, persimmons and berries.
As with any records program there are several ties at various weights heavier than his, with a total of 37 record bears larger than his bear.
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India brotherbear Offline
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#13
( This post was last modified: 01-07-2016, 05:39 AM by brotherbear )

The Works of Theodore Roosevelt - volume 4 of 14.

The whole thing was over in twenty seconds from the time I caught sight of the game; indeed, it was over so quickly that the grisly did not have time to show fight at all or come a step toward us. It was the first I had ever seen, and I felt not a little proud, as I stood over the great brindled bulk, which lay stretched out at length in the cool shade of the evergreens. He was a monstrous fellow, much larger than any I have seen since, whether alive or brought in dead by the hunters. As near as we could estimate ( for of course we had nothing with which to weigh more than very small portions ) he must have weighed about twelve hundred pounds, and though this is not as large as some of his kind are said to grow in California, it is yet a very unusual size for a bear. He was a good deal heavier than any of our horses; and it was with greatest difficulty that we were able to skin him. He must have been very old, his teeth and claws being all worn down and blunted; but nevertheless he had been living in plenty, for he was as fat as a prize hog, the layers on his back being a finger's length in thickness. He was still in the summer coat, his hair being short, and in color a curious brindled brown, somewhat like that of certain bulldogs, while all the bears we shot afterward had the long winter fur, cinnamon or yellowish brown. By the way, the name of this bear has reference to its character and not to its color, and should, I suppose, be properly spelt grisly - in the sense of horrible, exactly as we speak of a "grisly spectre" - and not grizzly; but perhaps the latter way of spelling it is too well established to be now changed.
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United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
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#14
( This post was last modified: 01-07-2016, 06:09 AM by Pckts )

Are those scores simply from hunting records only?

And according to those scores, the Kodiak is larger than the Polar bear?

A couple of things, wouldn't morphology create some differences in score?
Maybe one has thicker or thinner limbs than the other.
One may be taller or shorter, longer etc.

Couldn't all of those factors play a role?

Also, doesn't the Polar hold all the records for heaviest and tallest bear?
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India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
#15
( This post was last modified: 01-07-2016, 07:03 AM by brotherbear )

The Bear Almanac by Gary Brown.

Northern Montana, near Choteau: In May 2007 a 750-pound male grizzly bear was trapped ( for research ). Also very large for the spring, the bear, if it had gained normal weight, again considering its habitat and time of year, would have weighed 900 pounds by fall. With a length of 7 feet, 6 inches, 3.5 inch claws, and a 4-foot neck circumference, the bear is the second-largest grizzly recorded in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem.
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