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Barbary or Atlas lions

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#46

(01-19-2020, 11:23 PM)LazarBeam110 Wrote: A young lion 1895

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Did you get that from Happyknowledge.com, which has pictures of both lions and leopardshttps://www.happyknowledge.com/post/Le%2...EtQwkSdTgL

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LazarLazar Offline
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#47

Another subspecies very closely related to the Asian lion - the Barbary lion or Panthera leo leo - became extinct in the wild in 1922 (in Morocco). This Barbary lion had been the dominant animal in the blood sports of the Roman arenas.
http://www.pothos.org/content/indexedda.html?page=lions
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#48
( This post was last modified: 01-31-2020, 07:31 PM by BorneanTiger )

(01-30-2020, 01:40 AM)LazarLazar Wrote: Another subspecies very closely related to the Asian lion - the Barbary lion or Panthera leo leo - became extinct in the wild in 1922 (in Morocco). This Barbary lion had been the dominant animal in the blood sports of the Roman arenas.
http://www.pothos.org/content/indexedda.html?page=lions

Aside from the fact that the Barbary lion has now been grouped into the same subspecies as Asiatic lions and lions in northern parts of Africa (including West Africa), that is the Northern lion (Panthera leo leo; see my reply here), it's not necessary that the last wild Barbary lion became extinct in even 1942, because it's possible that a small remnant population may have survived in remote montane areas into the early 1960s: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3616087/

Map of subspecies of lions by the Cat Specialist Group, 2017, pages 71–73: https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/hand...=y#page=71

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United States Lycaon Online
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#49

Atlas lion in sindibad park Morocco.


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#50

(02-23-2020, 08:00 PM)Lycaon Wrote: Atlas lion in sindibad park Morocco.


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Or a partial Atlas lion, if you like, with possible Central African roots, though this male in Casablanca is pretty impressive, more robust than the lions in Rabat's Zoo, like you said earlier here.
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#51

As mentioned in the thread for the Asiatic lion, Reginald Innes Pocock had published the book "The Fauna Of British India Including Ceylon And Burma Mammalia (Volume 1)", in which he talked about the Asiatic lion, as well as African lions to a lesser extent. In pages 218–220, he mentioned that Captain Smee thought that Gujarati or Indian lions differed from African lions by their smaller manes. Pocock reckoned that Captain Smee's conception of African lions having bigger manes was probably due to specimens kept at European menageries (which can have thicker manes than wild lions), or due to the heavy manes of Barbary lions from Algeria or Cape lions from what was the Cape Colony, which had often been exported to Europe for exhibition in the early part of the 19th century. This thread is dedicated to Like how the Barbary lion of the Maghreb (Northwest Africa) was the type specimen for the Northern subspecies of lions in northern parts of Africa and Eurasia (particularly India), which was given the trinomen Panthera leo leo by the Cat Specialist Group in 2017, the Cape lion of modern South Africa was the type specimen for the Southern subspecies of lions in Southern and Eastern Africa, which were given the trinomen Panthera leo melanochaita, more details here: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-cape-li...#pid111709
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#52

This is a book about animals that were kept at the Tower Menagerie in London, from the year 1829. It speaks of there being 3 varieties of lions, the Bengal lion (Asiatic lion), the Cape lion, and the Barbary lion, and it mentions that the Bengal lion had a more extensive mane than the Cape lion, though the Cape lion was bigger than both the Asiatic lion and other African lions! https://archive.org/stream/towermenageri...4/mode/2up

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India Rishi Offline
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#53
( This post was last modified: 04-30-2020, 10:48 AM by Rishi )

The lines in this photo look so eerily similar to what about a Barbary pride would have looked like, in the Mediterranean forests of northern Atlas range.

Pic by TjMoody Wild Animal Photography — at Woodland Park Zoo.


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United States Lycaon Online
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#54

Another angle of that well known photo.


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United Kingdom Asad981 Offline
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#55

Since the Great Barbary lion is extinct it does not have any scientific studies on it. Our best source on the habits and accounts of barbary lions come from a French hunter, The Lion-killer. I will post many accounts and information about North African lions from his books later, stay tuned.

Jules Gerard


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United Kingdom Asad981 Offline
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#56
( This post was last modified: 05-09-2020, 06:37 AM by Rishi )

Painting depicting a fight between two male Barbary lions while a lioness watches the fight. Circa 1890



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