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Asiatic Lion - Data, Pictures & Videos

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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The Gir lions showed by @sanjay search for the human zone in order to find something to eat or glean. As for the African lions you show @Rishi they are truly wild and don't seek at all the human settlements. But of course, they have learnt to know and fear the men and thus stay careful in front of them. Men and lions are watching each other, and in case of a man's false movement, the situation can very quickly be very problematic.

I also believe that lions know what a gun is and between armed men in fatigues (with guns and rifles) and a single tourist they know the difference.

It's a delicate balance I think. Lions inside great parks live as quite free lions do, they have enough preys to hunt and eat and they haven't reason to fear and flee from the guards, just stay cautious. And even less reasons to enter "an human zone". They stay linked to their territories.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-17-2019, 04:42 PM by Rishi )

(07-17-2019, 11:22 AM)Spalea Wrote: The Gir lions showed by @sanjay search for the human zone in order to find something to eat or glean. As for the African lions you show @Rishi they are truly wild and don't seek at all the human settlements. But of course, they have learnt to know and fear the men and thus stay careful in front of them. Men and lions are watching each other, and in case of a man's false movement, the situation can very quickly be very problematic.

Yes, no doubt one side is much more accustomed to human presence, although i've learnt that they spend most of their times in habitat patches or groves & farmlands resembling natural vegetation.

Except unlike those African lions and like the sugarcane tigers of Terai, they really don't have a choice but to depends on cattle & occasional crop-raiding herbivores.
What I'm saying is, there's no way of knowing how those African lions' cousins would have behaved in similar landscapes, because they have been killed off in all similar landscapes.

The reason these ones survive is also the reason fear factor is lower on both sides. What it all boils down to is; they face no repercussions for their cattlelifting.
The locals keep all their old & male calves (which pastoral herders can afford, given the fodder is free) spread out beside & behind the main herd of breeding/milking females & calves, as lion fodder.

The system has downsides as we can all see, but as far as "losing their wildness" is concerned or that lion not charging one of those bikers, it may very well be counted as a behavioural adaptation crucial to the survival in human dominated landscape.
We know that African lion have been known to behave similarly on similar cases.






...so are tigers.






So do the hundreds of leopards that live in Greater-Gir landscape, otherwise infamous for causing most attacks on humans over rest of India.

Lastly I know I regularly say that these lions should be moved to any proper habitats available in the region, but how do we really relocate 400 lions?
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Rishi :

About #1172


When at first men created parks in order to protect lions and tigers they learnt how to behave in front of them. Now, as some parks becoming too small for the lions or tigers populations, the big cats are learning how to behave when they enter into human zones or settlements.

Ine one of the video you showed, a lion crosses the road, and stops to allow to pass a man riding a motorbike. Perhaps the felids are going to learn the highway code... I' m joking, but the felids aren't responsible for their situation. There are some limits to what they can make and support with men and drivers.

And an accident is always possible and threats to becomme more and more frequent. As you told we cannot move 400 lions from an human zone to a wild zone. And if these lions will be more and more numerous, bad interactions between them and human population will becomme more and more common. This is a big risk, I fear.




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Germany Lycaon Online
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Mahipat Darbar

Not the best photo but good non the less .


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Germany Lycaon Online
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Ricky Patel

EMERGING FROM BLOSSOMED GREEN


after taking afternoon nap....yawning king....coming out of his....flowery green abode....

Sasan Gir 
August 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-21-2019, 08:01 AM by Rishi )

(07-17-2019, 04:36 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rishi :

About #1172


When at first men created parks in order to protect lions and tigers they learnt how to behave in front of them. Now, as some parks becoming too small for the lions or tigers populations, the big cats are learning how to behave when they enter into human zones or settlements.

Ine one of the video you showed, a lion crosses the road, and stops to allow to pass a man riding a motorbike. Perhaps the felids are going to learn the highway code... I' m joking, but the felids aren't responsible for their situation. There are some limits to what they can make and support with men and drivers.

And an accident is always possible and threats to becomme more and more frequent. As you told we cannot move 400 lions from an human zone to a wild zone. And if these lions will be more and more numerous, bad interactions between them and human population will becomme more and more common. This is a big risk, I fear.





That tigress was from a national park, ones from the other 50% living in human dominated landscapes rarely do that... Volatile individuals are always the cause of problem, on both sides. 

What you say is very real issue athough, the revenue areas around Gir reserve have almost reached saturation too. That's the reason the lions are expanding their range. Still the lions' satellite metapopulations of Greater Gir are all concentrated around the larger forest tracts. Whatever lion presence you see in villages & farms, is mostly movement between local patches.

Source:
*14th Lion Population Estimation Report-2015
*'Site'ing the right reasons: Critical evaluation of conservation planning for the Asiatic lion
*Managing success: Asiatic lion conservation, interface problems and peoples’ perceptions in the Gir Protected Area

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unprotected & unclassed, these however remain vulnerable to being lost to conversion for other use like industry or infrastructure development. They need to be properly demarcated under each village or municipal administrative unit.

Ironically, the farther you go from Gir the more these kind of patches would be available to them, to west & east & north, larger too. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

But to get the lions to truely form separate independent populations, they need to be randomly rounded up from all over Greater Gir and artificially reintroduced to large viable protected areas (Note: You can't possibly move enough of them to relieve pressure around Gir, which will churn out more lions to swiftly replace them too. This has a different purpose).
Because otherwise the south will remain overpopulated with lions while larger habitat swathes lying farther away would have populations started by only a handful of lions breeding among themselves.

*This image is copyright of its original author

PS: Old post i made on this long ago, containing some more points.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Germany Lycaon Online
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rasik chavda

Even though these are older photos I still wanted to share.



*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author






*This image is copyright of its original author
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Yatin Verma


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