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Asiatic Lion - Data, Pictures & Videos

India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-08-2019, 11:19 PM by Rishi )

(03-08-2019, 10:51 PM)Rage2277 Wrote:
(03-08-2019, 10:28 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(03-08-2019, 08:38 PM)Lycaon Wrote: Sudipa G. Chatterjee



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*This image is copyright of its original author


@Rishi and @Sanju

AFAIK Gir doesn't have either leopard cat or fishing cat, that far dry west.

Hard to tell, but i think it's a Rusty spotted cat. Can you ask the photographer? ..or check if she wrote anything with the photos.
yea i was thinking about that too..they're pretty rare i've never heard of them in that area..though it looks like one looking at the head,rusty spotteds have round faces,but then it's eyes are bulging so the lion must have bit down on the head giving it a somewhat elongated appearance

I got it... That's an Indian desert cat, also called Asiatic wildcat (Felis lybica ornata), the only other small feline found in west & northwest Indian subcontinent. No fishing & leopard cats there, i checked .

I'm fairly sure of it. Only they have pointed ears & white below jaws. Spots & coat colour are similar too.

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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-09-2019, 12:25 PM by Sanju )

Rusty: The short fur is grey over most of the body, with rusty spots over the back and flanks, while the underbelly is white with large dark spots. The darker colored tail is thick and about half the length of the body, and the spots are "less distinct". There are six dark streaks on each side of the head, extending over the cheeks and forehead.

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*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

You can see adult Rusty's have pale spots like the name saying rusty spotted cat. Their tail is lot thick than Asiatic wild cat in the pic. (The above pic angle only is confusing me and making it hard to decide with that narrow head like rusty and those streaks which are distinct similar to rusty's neck rather than stripes of asiatic wild cat's neck)

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So, over all I think it is an Asiatic wild cat. @Lycaon

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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-09-2019, 05:02 PM by Rishi )

(11-18-2018, 03:20 PM)Rishi Wrote: Other than that...

You made a few critical statements which i can't find any sources on. Numbers & statistic cannot be without sources, unless it is widely available on Internet.
Quote:As they already reports of two lions frequently were seen in and out of Barda. there is no translocation to Barda as they are already residing there.
The one i'm most interested in, about whether or not their range has naturally reached close enough to Barda.

@Rishi remember that? Huh I was not interested to retrieve the sources (and possessive to share info that I know then) that I didn't bookmark "then" to give a correct reply but now see what I got for you...

Barda Dungar has a lion gene pool (10 Dec, 2014)

Officials said that two pairs of lions from completely different areas were captured and brought to Rampara and now to Barda to ensure that the genes differed. "If the lioness is from Sasan, the lion would be from a far-off area of Tulsishyam and even Bhavnagar," a forest official told TOI.

In Barda also, the two pairs have already been shifted and they have come close to each other and are also engaged in mating. Officials are keeping a close watch on the development in Barda.

Officials said that among concerns raised by experts, a study by Stephen J O'Brien, chief of the laboratory of viral carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute in Maryland, revealed: "A limited sample of Gir lion from Sakkarbaug zoo revealed high levels of spermatozoal abnormalities. These results affirm the hypothesis that genetic diminishment of natural population may have unfavourable physiological effect such as increased spermatozoal abnormalities."

Experts say inbreeding and loss of genetic variation decrease the ability of wild populations to adapt to climatic changes and make them vulnerable to new diseases, parasites and pollutants.

Officials said that the gene pools are a long-term measure to help conserve genetic diversity. This is captive conservation of lions.

According to them, inbreeding has always been a concern. This could lead to deterioration in genes and rise in diseases harming the animals. "The gene pools will help us monitor and create healthy specimens," said a senior official involved in the project.


(Jan 01, 2017) Seven-year-old Asiatic lion shifted to Barda sanctuary near Porbandar from Gir forest two years ago (the one shifted to Barda in 2014 dec above news), died on December 30 after a week-long "Unnatural" illness

(Oct 6 2018) Principal chief conservator of forest (wildlife) Akshay Kumar Saxena said, “In wake of the recent death of lions, we will be giving the Barda project a ‘fresh look’ and ensure that there is a healthy population of lions in the region. There are also unconfirmed report of couple of lions reaching the Barda area recently from Forest officials and Trackers.”
@Rishi
Quote:Top Comment

Shifting lions to Barda is not the solution! Translocation of some individuals to Kuno Palpur should be part of reclaiming the lost distribution within India of the Asiatic lion...
- Ovie Agege Moving lions to Barda Sanctuary not enough: Expert   'Barda Dungar within reach of outbreak'

There already are reports of the local people having cited a couple of lions in Barda Dungar forest along with some Beat guards and foresters..
(Oct 7, 2018) @Rishi
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India Sanju Offline
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Ignore that Maldhari Part that's ridiculous and wrong propaganda. Other than that, good lion pics and Gir Landscapes.
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Germany Lycaon Offline
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Another hunt video




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Germany Lycaon Offline
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A pride of lions killing a boar




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India Sanju Offline
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Great Videos @Lycaon
Amazing effort Like Fantastic

1st Video is incomplete hunting of "Chital" Deer. Would love to see what happened next.
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Germany Lycaon Offline
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Some more natural prey

Male with nilgai cow kill


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Credits : http://thetravellerweare.blogspot.com/2014/05/gir-king-and-we.html
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India Sanju Offline
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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@Rishi :

About #228, #229 and #230 from the "Lion directory topic": https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-lion-di...o#pid73179


After having searched on google "Bado the asiatic lion", I discovered this video. Perhaps it has been already posted here, in this case sorry. By the way Bado is perhaps one of these two male lion (the one with the darker mane ?) before its dreadful fight... According to the photo introducing the video, Bado would be the lion on the right and this photo would have been took long after the fight (perhaps a bit retouched too).




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India Sanju Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author
Scary cat: Jayendra, an Asiatic lion, is part of the European endangered species programme at Edinburgh Zoo.
In the wild the animals inhabit Gujarat in India
STEVEN SCOTT TAYLOR/ALAMY
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2019, 04:52 PM by Rishi )

(03-10-2019, 02:20 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Rishi :

About #228, #229 and #230 from the "Lion directory topic": https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-lion-di...o#pid73179


After having searched on google "Bado the asiatic lion", I discovered this video. Perhaps it has been already posted here, in this case sorry. By the way Bado is perhaps one of these two male lion (the one with the darker mane ?) before its dreadful fight... According to the photo introducing the video, Bado would be the lion on the right and this photo would have been took long after the fight (perhaps a bit retouched too).





The thumbnail is of photoshopped African lions, but the video could be of them (not 100% sure) but from years ago, when they were young.
Turns out people misidentified them, both are called Nagraj by different people.

But they're the past... Have a look at the present.



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Germany Lycaon Offline
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Red eyed young male 

 Jimmy Patel
 


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A stuffed lion in Palestine


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Full document : small note of lions in the middle east
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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RIP Bado,
Bye your way, you were indomitable
You lost a fight
And a whole eyepiece
You recovered
And ruled again on your territory...
Never surrendered. 



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Ink and bamboo stick.
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