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How long Javan Tiger live in Java?

Indonesia P.T.Sondaica Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 07-21-2017, 02:48 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: Appropriately renamed )

I have question how long javan tiger live in java
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#2

I heard that the oldest tiger fossils from there was like over 1.6 mya.
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Indonesia P.T.Sondaica Offline
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(07-21-2017, 09:01 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: I heard that the oldest tiger fossils from there was like over 1.6 mya.

I mean modern javan tiger...no ancient tiger thats not anchestor of modern java tiger
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United States tigerluver Offline
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The Javan tiger can be considered a chronospecies of the tiger lineage of the Sunda shelf. Essentially, from the moment the island of Java came to be, the evolutionary forces caused by island isolation began shifting the ancestral P. t. soloensis into the modern Javan tiger. Modern Sunda shelf sea level were reached about 17,000 years ago. So give the ancestral tiger a few thousand years for evolution and you have your modern Javan tiger, more or less. So simply, a bit after the island of Java came to be.
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Indonesia P.T.Sondaica Offline
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(07-22-2017, 08:11 AM)tigerluver Wrote: The Javan tiger can be considered a chronospecies of the tiger lineage of the Sunda shelf. Essentially, from the moment the island of Java came to be, the evolutionary forces caused by island isolation began shifting the ancestral P. t. soloensis into the modern Javan tiger. Modern Sunda shelf sea level were reached about 17,000 years ago. So give the ancestral tiger a few thousand years for evolution and you have your modern Javan tiger, more or less. So simply, a bit after the island of Java came to be.

Thankyou so much sir...but i still dont understain 
This just 17.000 isolation will make a different subspesies indonesian(java bali sumatra)?i think a new subspesies will created 50.000 years isolation...
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United States tigerluver Offline
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Island evolution happens quicker than evolution on the mainland as population are completely separated from each other. This results in no gene flow between the Java, Bali, and Sumatra populations which allows certain traits of the initial tigers that were trapped on each island to amplify rapidly in their progeny (this is called genetic drift and sometimes the founder effect). 

Nonetheless, your point is agreed upon by at least some scientists. Some have proposed that there are only two tiger subspecies today, the mainland tigers and the island (Sumatra, Java, Bali) tigers. Furthermore, regardless of what subspeciation method one agrees with, the Bali and Javan tiger are very similar thus the subspeciation differences are not as strong as say, between the Amur and Sumatran tiger.
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Indonesia P.T.Sondaica Offline
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(07-27-2017, 10:44 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Island evolution happens quicker than evolution on the mainland as population are completely separated from each other. This results in no gene flow between the Java, Bali, and Sumatra populations which allows certain traits of the initial tigers that were trapped on each island to amplify rapidly in their progeny (this is called genetic drift and sometimes the founder effect). 

Nonetheless, your point is agreed upon by at least some scientists. Some have proposed that there are only two tiger subspecies today, the mainland tigers and the island (Sumatra, Java, Bali) tigers. Furthermore, regardless of what subspeciation method one agrees with, the Bali and Javan tiger are very similar thus the subspeciation differences are not as strong as say, between the Amur and Sumatran tiger.

In google now still 9 subspecies...not 2
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