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  What would happen if there were as many tigers as humans on Earth?
Posted by: alabay - Today, 04:07 AM - Forum: Debate and Discussion about Wild Animals - No Replies
Hypothetical question: What would happen if there were as many tigers as humans on Earth ? (around 7,9 billion) Would we live in peaceful coexistence? Maybe the biggest challenge would be for the smaller animals but I guess there would be some economic costs as well. What do you think? Let's say tomorrow morning there suddenly were 7,9 billion tigers on Earth.
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  what do you think of Cryptocurrency/Blockchain/NFT?
Posted by: sanjay - 01-19-2022, 10:53 AM - Forum: Miscellaneous - Replies (6)
Hello WildFact Members,

I am exploring Blockchain possibilities. I can see blockchain is getting popular and it has wide range of applications. Some of the common use case are:

1. DeFi
Decentralized Finance. Lend, barrow and Stack and earn better APY.

2. NFT
Great way for creative person to monetize their assets.

3. Metaverse
With Facbook changing its name to Meta, things will be changing fast in coming future. We will witness next phase of Internet.

4. P2E
Play to earn is going to be huge for gamer. In coming years, Big game company are making economy over blockchain to reward users who play their game. You can mint/collect NFT, sell your weapons to other. This huge Play to earn economy is going to dominate Game world. Axie Infinity is perfect example of such game.

5. DAO
Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO). Yes this could be the next big thing in Blockchain industry.

Any list goes on. I think the above 5 are going to dominate more.

So, to my group members, What is your take on Blockchain or Cryptocurrency disruption ?

Well, If I see enough interest, I am willing to educate and learn myself about this more through a new community.
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  Wild cats are the most muscular mammals on the Earth.
Posted by: alexandro - 01-07-2022, 01:19 AM - Forum: Debate and Discussion about Wild Animals - No Replies
After researching the physiology and anatomical composition of animals, I find that the most muscular mammals are the wild felines.

It is not possible to make comparisons between them, the felines, due to the differences in dissection methods, especially with respect to the extraction of body fat.

This is in reference to the two scientific papers from which these data are taken: Davis (1962) cited in Munro (1969) and Pitts and Bullard (1969).

Lions, possess a mean musculature of 58.8 % without including body fat in the total body weight (Davis 1962), and 57.1 % (Mentioned in (Cuff et. al. 2017)), including the "excessive fat" that one of the specimens had (Something that the original author mentioned).

Bobcats and Canada lynx, had a muscle percentage of 58.5 and 56.5 % respectively including fat, but 66.5 and 66.1 % of fat-free body weight (Pitts and Bullard 1969).

Lions, even with the percentage of muscle including fat (57.1 %), would possess a greater musculature than any mammal according to Munro (1969) who compared the relative musculature of various mammals, including lions (with the figure of 58.8 % not including body fat).

Bobcats and lynx had the highest percentages of musculature, after two species of squirrels, the eastern gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis and red squirrels Tamiasciurus hudsonicus, which possessed percentages of 61.4 and 59.2 % respectively (this taking into account fat as one of the body elements). But squirrels had unusually low amounts of body fat, compared to felids, and things change when body fat is not taken into account as an element of total body weight. Eastern gray squirrels and red squirrels possess relative musculature of 62.8 and 61.5 % of total fat-free body weight, respectively. Lower values compared to bobcats and Canada lynx under the same situation, which amount to 66.5 and 66.1 % respectively.

The image is my creation and the sources are cited, and the copyright of the images are also cited.

Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version).

*I not speak english.


Sources:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/....tb03240.x
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf....tb03240.x
https://www.nap.edu/read/20255/chapter/3#45
https://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2...ossil-lion
https://books.google.es/books?id=FDHLBAA...&q&f=false
https://books.google.es/books?id=-iBS6-2...&q&f=false
https://brainevo.sitehost.iu.edu/publica...BBE.04.pdf
https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/do...1&type=pdf


*This image is copyright of its original author

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  Linxia Cheetah - Acinonyx kurteni
Posted by: Acinonyx sp. - 01-02-2022, 01:41 AM - Forum: Pleistocene Big Cats - Replies (6)
This thread is about a possible extinct acinonyx species which is the linxia cheetah.
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  How do chameleons change colour?
Posted by: Wildling - 12-30-2021, 10:47 AM - Forum: Questions - No Replies
Hello,
I'm writing about the Pygmy Chameleon and am curious as to how these tiny reptilians change colour.
I would appreciate it if someone where to explain how a chameleon's colour changing ability works. 

Thanks
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  What if Sumatran Tigers are introduced to the Sundarbans or Amazon Jungle??
Posted by: LonePredator - 12-30-2021, 04:30 AM - Forum: Debate and Discussion about Wild Animals - No Replies
What if the Sumatran Tigers are introduced to the Sundarbans or the Amazon Rainforest?

So, since the Sumatran Tigers actually live in conditions which are a lot similar to the Sundarbans and also similar to the Amazon Rainforests to some degree, what changes could occur in these habitats if the Sumatran Tigers are introduced?

The existing apex predators of both the Sundarbans and the Amazon are very similar to the Sumatran Tigers. The Sundarban Tigers are almost the same weight as the Sumatran Tigers and so are the Jaguars. Both of them are great swimmers as well. Both live in dense forests as well

Do you think the Sumatran Tigers would be able to survive in these new habitats against the existing apex predators?? Would the existing apex predators of these habitats be able to survive after the introduction of Sumatran Tigers?? Would they co-exist with or without any adaptation/change?

Or any other notable changes could occur?
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  Jaguar corridor initiative and private reserves
Posted by: Sergio.Diniz - 12-28-2021, 05:23 PM - Forum: Jaguar - No Replies
I wrote this answer at Quora and would like to share with other jaguar lovers, but also hear more and keep updated on preservation initiatives that englobe all jaguar populations in Americas.

See https://qr.ae/pGzFbu 

This is my first attempt to create a tread, suggestions are welcome.
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  Cheetahs of Greater Kruger
Posted by: Tonpa - 12-28-2021, 07:14 AM - Forum: Wild Cats - Replies (21)
I've been loosely following the Cheetahs of the Sabi Sands, KNP and other private connected reserves and felt it would be nice to have somewhere to document and follow them on the forum!

I was initially going to make a cheetahs of Sabi Sands thread but since there's probably less then 5 Cheetah in the Sabi Sands at any one time I figured I'd do the whole open system.
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  What is the largest prey that any of the Brown Bears could kill/has killed?
Posted by: LonePredator - 12-26-2021, 03:24 AM - Forum: Bears - No Replies
What is the largest prey that any types of Brown Bears could kill/have killed?
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  How Strong Are Gorillas?
Posted by: wildtrails - 12-17-2021, 12:01 AM - Forum: Questions - No Replies



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