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World News (not involving animals)

Germany Jeffrey Offline
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#31

Interesting

Could the domino effect of climate change impacts knock us into ‘Hothouse Earth’?

... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has published a new report on the possibility of ‘Hothouse Earth’. The findings highlight the danger of man-made climate change setting off a domino effect of tipping points that would be irreversible and lead to catastrophic environmental, economic and social consequences.

Hothouse Earth could be 4-5°C warmer than pre-industrial temperatures and have sea levels 10-60m higher than today. This would inundate coastal areas, eliminate coral reefs and “places on Earth will become uninhabitable” ...

An example of this domino effect is given as “the loss of Greenland ice could disrupt the Gulf Stream ocean current, which would raise sea levels and accumulate heat in the Southern Ocean, which would in turn accelerate ice loss from the east Antarctic”.

Full News Update at https://eia-international.org/domino-eff...ouse-earth


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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-11-2018, 09:52 AM by peter )

In the seventies of the last century, reports about the devastating consequences of pollution caught the attention of many. Most unfortunately, captains of industry and politicians decided to ignore the message.

Half a century later, largely as a result of global warming, attitudes are slowly changing. The difference between awareness and action is money. Someone will have to pay, that is. As 'someone' equals all of us, action isn't likely. Not any time soon.

Many moons ago, when new methods of productions were introduced (referring to the Industrial Revolution), many people jumped from bridges. A hype that would pass, the others concluded. They adapted. Today, the lack of forethought is widely acknowledged. The problem is it now is close to impossible to affect the course of the machine that was created in the last two centuries.

Money often results in some kind of power. Power equals dominance. Dominance is very different from wisdom. Most of us are not guided by insight, but fear. This is the reason so many millions vote for those using it to their benefit. They don't know that fear and war are close friends. 

At the level of understanding and insight, in spite of a level of prosperity never seen before (in the western hemisphere in particular), not much was learned in the last 8 decades. In this respect, we still live in the Dark Ages.

It will take something special to change. One can only hope it won't be a calamity never seen before. It would be a great pity, as this planet is quite something. 

I propose to continue with the forum. Every contribution, no matter how small, has an effect.
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United States Polar Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 08-19-2018, 09:40 PM by Polar )

@peter,

True, and the amount of global warming deniers are increasing as well even though the effects of global warming are becoming more apparent. My father himself (who isn't dumb in any way) denies global warming by saying it is a "conspiracy peddled by government-paid researchers"! A lot of people from his position strangely tend to also be pro-private research (even though it was private-funded research that produced bad science) and more of a unrealistic libertarian stance on things...I am getting too political.

Yes, it will take a lot to slow down the effects of what we have done to the environment, but I think it is too late at this point to completely reverse it. Unfortunately, many people would instead choose to put the climate issue on the backburner (and outright ignore/deny it) and focus on small-scale issues instead.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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Canada Wolverine Offline
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#34
( This post was last modified: 09-20-2018, 03:17 AM by Wolverine )

WORLD LARGESTS ECONOMIES IN THE HISTORY


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This amazing chart shows that in continuation of large part of the history of civilization India was the largest economy in the planet. ( @Rishi @ @sanjay @Suhail @Vegeta San ). Starting 1000 BC (here not shown) to until 1000 AC India consist to around 40% of world economy. The decline started with the beginning of Muslim invasions in 11th century when India consisted still robust 1/3 of global GDP, exactly during the glorious Mughal era. Sharp decline of India's share started with the British rule when it fell to only ar. 10%. Amazingly after Indipendance India's share of world economy continue to fall and reach a all time low in the 70's of the 20th century, a miserable 5-6% of the global GDP. India - a country which since a times immemorial always has been symbol of unspeakable richness and unimaginable treasures among other nations become a symbol of poverty, misery and famine. But know with the beginning of 21th century we see that slowly step by step it start to recover. The opposite process has started.
In the contradiction of theoritics of so called "family planning" insisting that modern India has too big population and it has to be limited actually the truth is exactly opposite - current share of global population of India is only 16-17%, while in the glorious times of Ashoka almost 4 of 10 people in the world inhabited India and Muglal India consisted 29% of world population. Even if we take into account the neigbouring countries of subcontinent, it consist "only" of 21-22% of world population.
Economy of China according o the chart become equal to India's economy ar. 1500 AC, while the highest point of US economy was the years after WWII - roughly 40% of global GDP.
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China Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#35

(03-01-2018, 12:36 AM)Pckts Wrote:
(02-28-2018, 04:23 PM)Nyers Wrote: South Africa parliament votes to confiscate white-owned land without compensation 


*This image is copyright of its original author


http://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/w...3576c4c0bc

This is a very dangerous game to play... I see a lot of conflict in the near future from this decision.
Pckts, would you want to vote for the mid-election in this year ?
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India Rishi Offline
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India govt. plans ₹65,000-crore project to reduce greenhouse gases from agriculture
The goal of the project, with a run period 2018-2025, is to “sequestrate” 49.9 million tonnes of carbon gasses through improved agro-ecosystems.
Updated: Sep 24, 2018 


*This image is copyright of its original author

Flooded rice paddies emit as much as 500 million tons, which is around 20% of total manmade emissions of methane.

India is set to roll out its most integrated programme yet to cut greenhouse gases from agriculture. The project is primarily aimed at protecting the country’s five biggest vulnerable ecological landscapes, according to a two officials familiar with the matter.

The programme will cover Madhya Pradesh’s Chambal region, Dampa in Mizoram, Odisha’s Similipal, Jaisalmer and Barmer in Rajasthan besides a national wildlife corridor through Uttarakhand, the officials said.

The programme, involving the agriculture and environment ministries, is part of a global initiative of the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), a partnership 183 countries, including India.

Each of these critical biodiversity zones – home to over a third of India’s 300 million tribals, precious wildlife and forests – face a specific threat from unsustainable agriculture, including large-scale land degradation.

Climate change and agriculture have a two-way relationship. Farming contributes to and is adversely impacted by climate change, according to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

The goal of the project, with a run period 2018-2025, is to “sequestrate” 49.9 million tonnes of carbon gasses through improved agro-ecosystems. Carbon sequestration refers to the process of offsetting harmful emissions through mitigation.

“The programme will serve like one national platform to integrate various ongoing schemes for sustainable agriculture,” said agriculture ministry joint secretary Alka Bhargava.

Agriculture activities are widely known to emit three kinds of harmful gases: carbon dioxide from soil cultivation, methane from livestock and nitrous oxide from fertilizers. Greenhouse emissions are a significant driver of climate change by trapping heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and causing global warming, according to FAO.

In the Chambal region, an area covering 97,982 hectares, the main threats include expanding ravines, sparse vegetation and pollution from chemical-runoffs from agriculture, an official document states. Mitigation proposals include organic cultivation and sustainable grazing of cattle.

In Mizoram, the project will span the Dampa Tiger Reserve and the Thorangtlang Wildlife Sanctuary, covering 145,670 hectares in the Lunglei and Mamit regions. Jhum cultivation has been a major threat to land degradation in the state. In Odisha, the project will be spread over 556,900 hectares, including the UNESCO recognized Simlipal Biosphere Reserve.

Jaisalmer and Barmer in Rajasthan have been picked to create an ecologically sustainable “Desert National Park”, spanning 316,200 hectares.

In Uttarakhand, the Corbett Tiger Reserve and the Rajaji Tiger Reserve will be covered, spanning 324,696 hectares in Nainital, Pauri Garhwal, Almora, Dehradun and Haridwar districts.

“The main idea behind the programme is to integrate environmental concerns with agricultural practices and policies,” said Jeffrey Griffin of FAO.

The overall cost of implementing the project is US$ 902 million (₹65,000 crore approximately), with a GEF grant of US$ 33.5 million. The remaining US$ 868 million will be available through the co-financing route. The GEF, of which India is a leading member nation, works for solutions to the world’s most “challenging environmental issues related to biodiversity, climate change, land degradation, chemicals, and international waters”. The government has decided to increase India’s share of funding to the GEF by 25%, an official said.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Suhail Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-07-2018, 02:15 PM by Suhail )

Over 70% of Africa's grazing land is facing degradation due to invasive plant species
Introduced as a viable reforestation solution, Prosopis juliflora is causing land degradation in Africa and has put pastoralists at risk as grasslands are turning into deserts
Updated:04 october 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

When Kenya's agriculture ministry introduced Prosopis juliflora—a thorny weed native to South America—to arrest soil erosion in Baringo County in the Rift Valley, 30 years ago, it was viewed as a viable solution. However, this particular step to combat land degradation backfired with fatal consequences for the local populace and livestock. The noxious weed spread quickly, displaced native flora and destroyed biodiversity. It for med impenetrable thickets, blocking people’s access to fresh waterbodies. 

The “irresponsible” act enraged the pastoral Ilchamus community, which sued the Kenyan government in 2006 and sought compensation for innumerable damages: loss of rich pasture lands, destruction of water sources and damage to livestock. Though the court ordered the government to clear the weed, nothing was done to contain its spread. The community was not compensated either. The weed is still expanding, forcing herders to abandon their lands. There have been other cases also related to the weed, but nothing has happened so far. 

Invasive species like Prosopis juliflora, which thrive on degraded lands, were introduced in Africa as reforestation solutions, says Arne Witt, an expert on alien species, at the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, a Nairobi-based non-profit. Even in India, it is threatening bird population in Tamil Nadu.

“Invasive alien plants reproduce faster and have few or no natural enemies. They impact the productivity of croplands and give rise to human-wildlife conflicts due to gradual land erosion,” Witt explains.

At present, sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is under threat from wild sage (Lantana camara), Chromolaena odorata, a tropical flowering shrub native to the Americas and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora). These species threaten the future of pastoralism in Africa, where over 70 per cent of 500 million hectares (ha) of grazing land is facing degradation. Scientists warn that these degraded landscapes, incapable of supporting either farm animals or wildlife, will soon resemble deserts. 

Restoring degraded lands
To counter these harmful species, Witt advises land restoration. One sure shot way is to ensure that only indigenous plants are used for reforestation. Land degradation is a serious issue in Africa. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the continent loses about 2.8 million ha of forests each year, and about 50 million ha are affected by degradation 

To tackle this, 20 African countries have committed to restore 100 million ha of degraded forestland by 2030 under the African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative. 
The Great Green Wall Initiative, which is part of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, aims to halt the southward spread of the Sahara desert. This would help sequester 250 million tonnes of carbon, create millions of jobs in rural areas and benefit more than 232 million people in the Sahel region of Africa. Under this, some 8,000 km-stretch of land will be restored from Senegal in the west to Djibouti in the east. Founded in 2007 by 21 countries, the initiative has restored about 15 per cent of land till now.

But while these are commendable efforts, the reality is that more eco-systems are being lost each year, says Rwanda’s Lands and Forestry Minister Francine Tumushime. “Land restoration in Africa is a huge challenge, but a holistic approach using land and forestry governance tools would help accelerate the process,” Tumushime says. 
Read full:https://www.downtoearth.org.in/news/environment/over-70-of-africa-s-grazing-land-is-facing-degradation-due-to-an-invasive-plant-species-61745
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Rage2277 Offline
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#38

they should try genetically enhancing livestock to target these shrubs
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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United States Roflcopters Offline
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#39

Did anyone here watch that UFC fight last night? what an event! best entertainment.
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United States Polar Offline
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#40

Didn't like the way Khabib acted post-fight, but I always bet on him!
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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India Rishi Offline
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#41
( This post was last modified: 11-29-2018, 07:49 PM by Rishi )

With India targetting 30% electric vehicles by 2030, Maharashtra plans e-vehicles in Tiger Reserves

Mumbai, Nov 25: To promote a clean environment, Maharashtra government has decided to use only electric vehicles inside tiger reserves for tourists.

As per a government resolution issued on Friday, such electric vehicles should be approved by the regional transport office. At present, Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR) is the only park using only one such vehicle.

"At places where new vehicles are needed, electric vehicles will be bought on priority. In this case, importance should be given to the families displaced from the buffer zone and protected zone of the tiger project. Electric vehicles would be given 50% concession in entry fee," the GR said.

It also said this policy will promote Maharashtra electric vehicle policy - 2018 and environment-friendly tourism. The government has announced the policy to make the State competitive in production of electric vehicles and its separate parts at the global level. "The National Tiger Conservation Authority too has recommended use of electric vehicles in tiger projects for tourism and safari," it said, "this policy will promote Maharashtra electric vehicle policy - 2018 and environment-friendly tourism".

The National Tiger Conservation Authority too has recommended use of electric vehicles in all Tiger Projects for tourism and safari. Maharashtra intends to be a pioneer in applying that protocol.

The Union government has decided to make India a 30% electric vehicle nation by 2030. For this, the Union government has initiated the Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of (Hybrid) and Electric vehicles, which aims to save 120 million barrel fuel and to cut carbon dioxide emission by 40 lakh tonnes.

The United Nations Organization (UNO) also plans to promote electric vehicles on a large-scale by 2030. Taking cue from this, the government of India too has vowed to convert the country into 'electric vehicle nation'. Although the adoption of EVs in India has witnessed a number of bottlenecks, in 2016 Indian govt aimed to make India a 100% EV nation by 2030. But in March this year that Gail was changed to a more realistic 30%.

According to experts, several factors including higher cost of vehicles, power outages, lack of charging infrastructure and dearth of facilities for eco-friendly disposal of batteries to curb pollution are among the factors inhibiting consumers from buying electric vehicles in India.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Germany Lycaon Offline
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#42

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article225129345.html

@epaiva 
I hope everything turns out well for Venezuela, and for you to stay safe in these turbulent times.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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(01-27-2019, 06:45 PM)Lycaon Wrote: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/venezuela/article225129345.html

@epaiva 
I hope everything turns out well for Venezuela, and for you to stay safe in these turbulent times.
@Lycaon Thanks a lot my Friend
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India Suhail Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-17-2019, 03:02 PM by Suhail )

It’s official: the planet is getting greener
ANNEMARIE MCCARTHY Lonely Planet Writer
After nearly two decades of recording data, NASA has confirmed what it began to suspect in the 90’s; the world really is becoming a greener place and two unlikely countries are leading the charge. 
Areas with the greatest increase in foliage are indicated in dark green. Image by NASA Earth Observatory:
*This image is copyright of its original author

For nearly 20 years NASA has been monitoring the Earth’s foliage using two satellites and the high-resolution data has revealed changes in the world’s vegetation in impressive detail, taking four images every day of every area of the planet.

Overall, the planet is 5% greener than it was in the early 2000s. This is the equivalent of the Amazon rainforest in extra leaf cover from plants and trees. At first, NASA believed it was as a result of climate change but with the new data, they’ve concluded that humans are behind a large part of this trend.
Guilin, Li River and Karst mountains, China. Photo by aphotostory/Shutterstock:
*This image is copyright of its original author

They also discovered something that surprised them; India and China accounted for one-third of the greening, despite having only 9% of the world’s green areas. Both countries have embarked on an extensive reforestation programme and, over the period of research, China’s foliage grew more than 10% while India’s increased by more than 6%. The global average was 2.3%.

While the message is positive in some places, the researchers are careful to note that this does not detract from the dire warnings in places like Indonesia and Brazil, where the loss of vegetation is ongoing and will have disastrous consequences for those ecosystems and biodiversity if left to continue. However, it does show that deforestation can be reversed.
Sholayar Reserve Forest, Kerala, India. Photo by Nate Hovee/Shutterstock:
*This image is copyright of its original author

Rama Nemani, a research scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center, explained in a statement: “Once people realize there’s a problem, they tend to fix it,” he said. “In the 70s and 80s in India and China, the situation around vegetation loss wasn’t good; in the 90s, people realized it; and today things have improved. Humans are incredibly resilient. That’s what we see in the satellite data.”
https://www.lonelyplanet.com/news/2019/0...en-planet/
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Finland Shadow Online
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(02-17-2019, 03:01 PM)Suhail Wrote: It’s official: the planet is getting greener
ANNEMARIE MCCARTHY Lonely Planet Writer
After nearly two decades of recording data, NASA has confirmed what it began to suspect in the 90’s; the world really is becoming a greener place and two unlikely countries are leading the charge. 
Areas with the greatest increase in foliage are indicated in dark green. Image by NASA Earth Observatory:
*This image is copyright of its original author

For nearly 20 years NASA has been monitoring the Earth’s foliage using two satellites and the high-resolution data has revealed changes in the world’s vegetation in impressive detail, taking four images every day of every area of the planet.

Overall, the planet is 5% greener than it was in the early 2000s. This is the equivalent of the Amazon rainforest in extra leaf cover from plants and trees. At first, NASA believed it was as a result of climate change but with the new data, they’ve concluded that humans are behind a large part of this trend.
Guilin, Li River and Karst mountains, China. Photo by aphotostory/Shutterstock:
*This image is copyright of its original author

They also discovered something that surprised them; India and China accounted for one-third of the greening, despite having only 9% of the world’s green areas. Both countries have embarked on an extensive reforestation programme and, over the period of research, China’s foliage grew more than 10% while India’s increased by more than 6%. The global average was 2.3%.

While the message is positive in some places, the researchers are careful to note that this does not detract from the dire warnings in places like Indonesia and Brazil, where the loss of vegetation is ongoing and will have disastrous consequences for those ecosystems and biodiversity if left to continue. However, it does show that deforestation can be reversed.
Sholayar Reserve Forest, Kerala, India. Photo by Nate Hovee/Shutterstock:
*This image is copyright of its original author

Rama Nemani, a research scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center, explained in a statement: “Once people realize there’s a problem, they tend to fix it,” he said. “In the 70s and 80s in India and China, the situation around vegetation loss wasn’t good; in the 90s, people realized it; and today things have improved. Humans are incredibly resilient. That’s what we see in the satellite data.”
https://www.lonelyplanet.com/news/2019/0...en-planet/

That is good news and hopefully in future more like that. Still that map picture can be somewhat misleading if not remembering, that it is about changes in situation, not showing actual situation about forests etc. For instance my country, Finland is looking like not green even though we have forests all over country. Also when comparing satellite image of India to that picture it is really easy to notice the difference.

Anyway good news and hopefully people all over the world would understand how important it is to find solutions to this huge problem.
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