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Wolf (Canis lupus)

Argentina Tshokwane Away
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#91

Credits to Carolyn Golba - Heart of the Wild Yellowstone.

Good Friday Morning,


In a wolf pack, order is regularly reinforced by displays of dominance and submission through a complex mix of vocal and physical communications. Wolves employ a variety of non-vocal forms of communication to express and maintain their status, relying on their posture, facial expression, ear and tail positioning, and more to communicate their intention. Body language can also be accompanied and reinforced by vocalizations.

Many dominance and submission displays are not violent or aggressive, as the subordinate wolf will quickly adopt a submissive posture. Often, subtle messages, like an authoritative stare from a dominant wolf and, in response, an averted glance by a subordinate wolf, are enough keep individual status understood. Alternately, especially if willingness to submit isn’t demonstrated, assertive aggression may ensue. Mistakenly, people too often interpret assertive dominance display language as being malicious and excessively cruel, but in reality, it is simply one of many ways wolves communicate and it generally does not result in any significant physical harm.

A wolf’s posture, when interacting with fellow pack members, says a lot about its status in the pack. Subordinates crouch trying to appear as small as possible and often lick the dominant wolf’s muzzle like a puppy, while alphas are readily identifiable as they broadcast confidence with their tall posture, stiff-legged gaits and tails sticking out and slightly raised.
Wolves frequently use ear and tail positioning, as well as facial expressions, to communicate. For example, ears flat back, close to the head with the tail tucked between the legs, accompanied by a slinking, slumping body posture, communicates submission. Ears perked up or forward with the tail straight out and slightly up indicates dominance. Ears sticking straight up or low and out to the side, teeth bared and a wrinkled snout, clearly communicates a very cross and threatening message.

Sometimes the lips will slightly curl, revealing just a few teeth as an initial warning, which is often all that is needed to send a clear message. And a reciprocating lick to the nose by the submissive wolf may help diffuse tension and avoid escalation.

When seeking to play with a fellow pack mate, a wolf will often stretch their front legs out and raise their hind quarters in the air in what is called a play bow. Play can include a game of chase. Or it can involve jaw sparring, from high-energy duels where two wolves will rear up on their hind legs and engage their front legs and jaws, to casual jaw sparring even while lying and rolling on the ground. A range of whining, groaning, and growling vocalizations usually accompanies jaw sparring.

All of this fortifies bonds and status and hones physical skills. Wolves are such interesting and complex animals. We can learn so much from them. Have a great day!- Carolyn

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Italy Ngala Offline
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#92
( This post was last modified: 01-13-2018, 10:10 PM by Ngala )

From Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve, India,

Photo and information credits: Ajit Kulkarni
LONE WOLF FROM THE LAND OF TIGERS
Although the Indian Wolf has been found abundantly across Indian sub continent in grasslands and having a peaceful Co existence with human habitations, but in recent decades has been threatened due to habitat loss. 
This individual made for a surprise sighting right inside core area of tiger reserve. Although there are old records of this, but today this rare sighting made our safari a success. 
Undoubtedly a rare sighting. Thanks for watching.

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United States Spalea Offline
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#93

@Ngala :

About#92: Nice photo ! Do the indian wolwes at last live in (small) group ? Or are they solitary ?
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#94

(01-14-2018, 03:05 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Ngala :

About#92: Nice photo ! Do the indian wolwes at last live in (small) group ? Or are they solitary ?

Seems that they live in a smaller groups than other relatives subspecies. In fact, is estimate that there are around 2000-3000 wolves in India; judging the large state with many wildlife reserves and large uncontamined habitats, the population is very low. In Italy is estimated a population around 2000-2500 wolves.
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United States Spalea Offline
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#95

(01-14-2018, 06:31 PM)Ngala Wrote:
(01-14-2018, 03:05 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Ngala :

About#92: Nice photo ! Do the indian wolwes at last live in (small) group ? Or are they solitary ?

Seems that they live in a smaller groups than other relatives subspecies. In fact, is estimate that there are around 2000-3000 wolves in India; judging the large state with many wildlife reserves and large uncontamined habitats, the population is very low. In Italy is estimated a population around 2000-2500 wolves.

Yes quite agree, with one difference...Among wild animals in Italy, the wolf is the top predator. In India, taking into account the tigers, leopards, bears, hyenas, dholes (often in big prides) and so on, the wolwes don't have an easy life. Without a doubt they are smart enough to adapt, but most indian animal sanctuaries being not big (average 50-200 km2), - outside the sanctuary, the human pressure prevails - I imagine that the indian wolf must be a discreet canid even more so if they live in small groups.
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Rishi Offline
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#96
( This post was last modified: 01-14-2018, 08:21 PM by Rishi )

@Spalea @Ngala Indian wolves (both plains & Himalayan ones) are pack animals only in name. They don't form packs described in that Kipling's horrendous excuse for a book. 

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Basically living in mating pairs, & practically outcompeted by copredators, they live in the scrublands & fringe forests. That's why their sightings in safari in larger reserves are rare... With cheetahs-lions gone the arids & grasslands are theirs.

They prefer it closer to humans, where other predators aren't much of a bother. Picking off herbivores raiding the farms at night, their presence near the villages is not unwelcome.

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The Himalayan/Tibetan wolves live their lives very similar to Arctic wolves...
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#97
( This post was last modified: 01-14-2018, 08:34 PM by Ngala )

(01-14-2018, 07:28 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(01-14-2018, 06:31 PM)Ngala Wrote:
(01-14-2018, 03:05 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Ngala :

About#92: Nice photo ! Do the indian wolwes at last live in (small) group ? Or are they solitary ?

Seems that they live in a smaller groups than other relatives subspecies. In fact, is estimate that there are around 2000-3000 wolves in India; judging the large state with many wildlife reserves and large uncontamined habitats, the population is very low. In Italy is estimated a population around 2000-2500 wolves.

Yes quite agree, with one difference...Among wild animals in Italy, the wolf is the top predator. In India, taking into account the tigers, leopards, bears, hyenas, dholes (often in big prides) and so on, the wolwes don't have an easy life. Without a doubt they are smart enough to adapt, but most indian animal sanctuaries being not big (average 50-200 km2), - outside the sanctuary, the human pressure prevails - I imagine that the indian wolf must be a discreet canid even more so if they live in small groups.

Yes, i'm in accord with you that in Italy the wolf is one of the top predators with bears (and Lynx, though they come from the north or the east [Swiss Alps, Austrian Alps and from the Julian Alps from Slovenija], there aren't a stable groups, even if it looks like it's coming back), but in reality there aren't due to the conflict or sharing the territories with other larger predators (although it certainly affects), but is due to the poaching and habitat loss.

For sure it's very elusive and away from the human eyes.
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Argentina Tshokwane Away
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#98

Credits to Russ Kehler - Old Wolf Photography.

I'm always intrigued by the human like relationships I see when watching wolves. I realize there are issues with anthropomorphizing yet it is difficult to ignore sometimes. 754M is long gone but he was known for being the kind Uncle who took his nephews and nieces under his wing, to teach them how to survive in the wild. He is seen here crossing the stream leading one of them to an elk kill.

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Argentina Tshokwane Away
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#99

Credits to Julie Argyle - Heart of the Wild Yellowstone.

Happy Wednesday everyone! Today I am reminiscing about the incredible year I had in the park watching wolves. Most of these photo's were taken at a very long distance and were also in rain and snow storms, but wow, what an incredible time I had watching this particular pack. So many memories that will last a lifetime. I never imagined when I started watching the Alpha Female of this pack a few years ago that her life would ever turn out this way. Such an amazing and incredible story. I can't wait to see what her future holds. And I definitely can't wait for spring to get here. Have an incredible day! - Julie

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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-15-2018, 10:14 AM by Rishi )

Interesting, was shocked reading that 90% of their food comes from the ocean http://themindcircle.com/swimming-sea-wolves/

Quote:Sea Wolves Who Swim For Hours & Live Off The Ocean

A population of sea wolves lives along the wild pacific coast of British Columbia. “We observed from exhaustive DNA studies that these kinds of wolves are genetically different from their continental kin,” says McAllister. “They behave differently and swim from one island to another while preying on sea animals. Morphologically, they are distinct – they have smaller size and are different physically from their mainland counterparts,” says Ian McAllister, a photographer who won an award and has been studying these animals for almost two decades.

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With the aid of breath taking pictures, he captured the magic of these wolves. When he swam towards the wolves, “the curious canine moved close to him that he could heard them grunting into his snorkel. After taking several frames, he then pushed back into deep water without attempting to look up.” writes the bioGraphic.

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These sea wolves could be called pescatarians because 90 percent of their food comes directly from the ocean, and obtained a fourth of it by consuming salmon. Despite the distinctive food patterns, they are also excellent swimmers, swimming to an archipelago 7.5 miles from the nearest landmass is their farthest record.

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peter Online
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(02-15-2018, 05:48 AM)Sully Wrote: Interesting, was shocked reading that 90% of their food comes from the ocean

http://themindcircle.com/swimming-sea-wolves/

First time I heard about sea wolves. Great photographs. 

Brown bears involved in salmon are larger than everywhere else. Polar bears doing blubber also are very large. Sea wolves, on the other hand, are smaller than relatives involved in deer. Remarkable.
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Wolves from Canadian national park Wood Buffalo, probably the largest non-Arctic wolves in the planet, hunt wood bisons. The wolf pack is 25 strong, some of the adult males perhaps weight around 60 kg.




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United States Spalea Offline
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@Wolverine :

About #102: unexpected outcome at 3:16 ! How do you explain it ? The panic of the herd on the run ?
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2018, 02:20 AM by Wolverine )

@GrizzlyClaws do you have any data for average weight of the wolves in Wood Buffalo NP (Alberta)? According to David Attenborough they are the largest wolves in the world and that's logical because they are specialised on hunting of bisons. I am not able to find any detailed data about these wolves.

The largest subspecies should be:
1. Arctic wolf
2. Mackenzie Valley wolf from Western Canada, including Alberta.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwestern_wolf
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(03-10-2018, 12:21 AM)Wolverine Wrote: @GrizzlyClaws do you have any data for average weight of the wolves in Wood Buffalo NP (Alberta)? According to David Attenborough they are the largest wolves in the world and that's logical because they are specialised on hunting of bisons. I am not able to find any detailed data about these wolves.

The largest subspecies should be:
1. Arctic wolf
2. Mackenzie Valley wolf from Western Canada.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northwestern_wolf


I don't feel competent in this area, and in the past, it was Guate's job to collect those data.
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