There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****
#1

The latest winners of the 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018' have been revealed – and they're as impressive as ever.
This contest is run by the Natural History Museum and it was the 55th year. More than 45,000 entries from wildlife photographers across 95 countries had been submitted

Here are some of the most spectacular winning entries.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles
'Hellbent': It was not looking good for the northern water snake, clamped tightly in the jaws of a hungry hellbender, but it was a remarkable find for David. Drifting downstream in Tennessee’s Tellico River, in search of freshwater life (as he had done for countless hours over the past seven years), he was thrilled to spot the mighty amphibian with its struggling prey. When the attacker tried to reposition its bite, wrinkly folds of skin rippling, the snake pushed free from its jaws and escaped. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ David Herasimtschuk)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Grand Title Winner
'The golden couple': A male Qinling golden snub-nosed monkey rests briefly on a stone seat. He has been joined by a female from his small group. Both are watching intently as an altercation takes place down the valley between the lead males of two other groups in the 50-strong troop. It’s spring in the temperate forest of China’s Qinling Mountains, the only place where these endangered monkeys live. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Marsel van Oosten)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Animals in their environment
'Bed of seals': A small ice floe in the Errera Channel at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula provides barely enough room for a group of crabeater seals to rest, and the cracks are starting to show. Crabeater seals are widespread in Antarctica and possible the most abundant of all seals anywhere. But they are also depended on sea ice, for resting, breeding, avoiding predators such as killer whales and leopard seals, and accessing feeding areas. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Cristobal Serrano)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Wildlife Photographer Portfolio Award
'Mother defender': A large Alchisme treehopper guards her family as the nymphs feed on the stem of a nightshade plant in El Jardín de los Sueños reserve in Ecuador. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Joan de la Malla)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Behaviour: Invertebrates
'Mud-rolling mud dauber': It was a hot summer day, and the waterhole at Walyormouring Nature Reserve, Western Australia, was buzzing. Georgina had got there early to photograph birds, but her attention was stolen by the industrious slender mud-dauber wasps, distinctive with their stalk-like first abdominal segments. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Georgina Steytler)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Behaviour: Mammals
'Kuhirwa mourns her baby': Kuhirwa, a young female member of the Nkuringo mountain gorilla family in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, would not give up on her dead baby. What Ricardo first thought to be a bundle of roots turned out to be the tiny corpse. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Ricardo Nunez Montero)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Story
'Signature tree': A male jaguar sharpens his claws and scratches his signature into a tree on the edge of his mountain territory in the Sierra de Vallejo in Mexico’s western state of Nayarit. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Alejandro Prieto)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Wildlife Photojournalism
'The sad clown': Timbul, a young long-tailed macaque, instinctively puts his hand to his face to try to relieve the discomfort of the mask he has to wear in Java, Indonesia. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Joan de la Malla)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Under Water
'Night flight': On a night dive over deep water – in the Atlantic, far off Florida’s Palm Beach – Michael Patrick O’Neill achieved a long-held goal, to photograph a flying fish so as to convey the speed, motion and beauty of this ‘fantastic creature’. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Michael Patrick O’Neill)


*This image is copyright of its original author

Winner, Behaviour: Birds
'Blood thirsty': When rations run short on Wolf Island, in the remote northern Galápagos, the sharp-beaked ground finches become vampires. Their sitting targets are Nazca boobies and other large birds on the plateau. Rather than leave and expose their eggs and chicks to the sun, the boobies appear to tolerate the vampires, and the blood loss doesn’t seem to cause permanent harm. (Wildlife Photographer of the Year/ Thomas P Peschak)
4 users Like sanjay's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB