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Tigers of South India & Western Ghats

United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-21-2019, 07:21 AM by Rishi )

Southern India is one of the lesser known tiger territories when it comes to individuals, but it is still one of the richest and diverse areas in all of India.
Please share any info on tigers, terrain or other species that inhabit this beautiful place.

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The Indian government declared the forests of Sathyamangalam Wildlife Sanctuary a Tiger Reserve on March 15, 2013.

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This forest along the Nilgiri hill range is to serve as aprotected corridor to faculitate movements and genetic exchange between tigers from Western Ghats, Eastern Ghats and Anamalai, Cardamom hills further south.



Western Ghats

Western Ghats (also known as Sahyadri meaning The Benevolent Mountains) is a mountain range that runs parallel to the western coast of the Indian peninsula, located entirely in India. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is one of the eight "hottest hot-spots" of biological diversity in the world.[1][2] It is sometimes called the Great Escarpment of India.[3] The range runs north to south along the western edge of the Deccan Plateau, and separates the plateau from a narrow coastal plain, called Konkan, along the Arabian Sea. A total of thirty nine properties including national parks, wildlife sanctuaries and reserve forests were designated as world heritage sites - twenty in Kerala, ten in Karnataka, five in Tamil Nadu and four in Maharashtra.[4][5]
The range starts near the border of Gujarat and Maharashtra, south of the Tapti river, and runs approximately 1,600 km (990 mi) through the states of Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu ending at Kanyakumari, at the southern tip of India. These hills cover 160,000 km2 (62,000 sq mi) and form the catchment area for complex riverine drainage systems that drain almost 40% of India. The Western Ghats block southwest monsoon winds from reaching the Deccan Plateau.[6] The average elevation is around 1,200 m (3,900 ft).[7]
The area is one of the world's ten "Hottest biodiversity hotspots" and has over 7,402 species of flowering plants, 1,814 species of non-flowering plants, 139 mammal species, 508 bird species, 179 amphibian species, 6,000 insects species and 290 freshwater fish species; it is likely that many undiscovered species live in the Western Ghats. At least 325 globally threatened species occur in the Western Ghats.[8][9][10]

The Western Ghats are the mountainous faulted and eroded edge of the Deccan Plateau. Geologic evidence indicates that they were formed during the break-up of the supercontinent of Gondwana some 150 million years ago. Geophysical evidence indicates that the west coast of India came into being somewhere around 100 to 80 mya after it broke away from Madagascar. After the break-up, the western coast of India would have appeared as an abrupt cliff some 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in elevation.[11] Basalt is the predominant rock found in the hills reaching a thickness of 3 km (2 mi). Other rock types found are charnockites, granite gneiss, khondalites, leptynites, metamorphic gneisses with detached occurrences of crystalline limestone, iron ore, dolerites and anorthosites. Residual laterite and bauxite ores are also found in the southern hills.

The Western Ghats extend from the Satpura Range in the north, stretching from Gujarat to Tamil Nadu. It traverses south past the states of Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka and Kerala. Major gaps in the range are the Goa Gap, between the Maharashtra and Karnataka sections, and the Palghat Gap on the Tamil Nadu and Kerala border between the Nilgiri Hills and the Anaimalai Hills. The mountains intercept the rain-bearing westerly monsoon winds, and are consequently an area of high rainfall, particularly on their western side. The dense forests also contribute to the precipitation of the area by acting as a substrate for condensation of moist rising orographic winds from the sea, and releasing much of the moisture back into the air via transpiration, allowing it to later condense and fall again as rain.

The northern portion of the narrow coastal plain between the Western Ghats and the Arabian Sea is known as the Konkan, the central portion is called Kanara and the southern portion is called Malabar. The foothill region east of the Ghats in Maharashtra is known as Desh, while the eastern foothills of the central Karnataka state is known as Malenadu.[12] The range is known as Sahyadri in Maharashtra and Karnataka. The Western Ghats meets the Eastern Ghats at Nilgiris in northwestern Tamil Nadu. Nilgiris connects Biligiriranga Hills in southeastern Karnataka with the Shevaroys and Tirumala hills. South of the Palghat Gap are the Anamala Hills, located in western Tamil Nadu and Kerala with smaller ranges further south, including the Cardamom Hills, then Aryankavu pass, Aralvaimozhi pass near Kanyakumari. In the southern part of the range is Anamudi (2,695 metres (8,842 ft)), the highest peak in Western Ghats.


The Western Ghats are home to four tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forest ecoregions – the North Western Ghats moist deciduous forests, North Western Ghats montane rain forests, South Western Ghats moist deciduous forests, and South Western Ghats montane rain forests. The northern portion of the range is generally drier than the southern portion, and at lower elevations makes up the North Western Ghats moist deciduous forests ecoregion, with mostly deciduous forests made up predominantly of teak. Above 1,000 meters elevation are the cooler and wetter North Western Ghats montane rain forests, whose evergreen forests are characterised by trees of family Lauraceae.

The evergreen forests in Wayanad mark the transition zone between the northern and southern ecologic regions of the Western Ghats. The southern ecologic regions are generally wetter and more species-rich. At lower elevations are the South Western Ghats moist deciduous forests, with Cullenia the characteristic tree genus, accompanied by teak, dipterocarps, and other trees. The moist forests transition to the drier South Deccan Plateau dry deciduous forests, which lie in its rain shadow to the east. Above 1,000 meters are the South Western Ghats montane rain forests, also cooler and wetter than the surrounding lowland forests, and dominated by evergreen trees, although some montane grasslands and stunted forests can be found at the highest elevations. The South Western Ghats montane rain forests are the most species-rich ecologic region in peninsular India; eighty percent of the flowering plant species of the entire Western Ghats range are found in this ecologic region.

In 2006, India applied to the UNESCO MAB for the Western Ghats to be listed as a protected World Heritage Site.[31] In 2012, the following places are declared as World Heritage Sites:[32][33] Mammals
There are at least 139 mammal species. Of the 16 endemic mammals, 13 are threatened and amongst the 32 threatened species include the critically endangered Malabar large-spotted civet, the endangered lion-tailed macaque, Nilgiri tahr, Bengal tiger and Indian elephants, the vulnerable Indian leopard, Nilgiri langur and gaur.[35][36][37]
These hill ranges serve as important wildlife corridors and forms an important part of Project Elephant and Project Tiger reserves. The largest population of tigers outside the Sundarbans is in the Western Ghats where there are seven populations with an estimated population size of 336 to 487 individuals occupying 21,435 km2 (8,276 sq mi) forest in three major landscape units spread across Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala.[38] The Western Ghats eco-region has the largest Indian elephant population in the wild with an estimated 11,000 individuals across eight distinct populations.[39][40] The endemic Nilgiri tahr which was on the brink of extinction has recovered and has an estimated 3,122 individuals in the wild.[41] The Critically Endangered endemic Malabar large-spotted civet is estimated to number fewer than 250 mature individuals, with no sub-population greater than 50 individuals.[42] About 3500 lion-tailed macaques live scattered over several areas in the Western Ghats.[43]


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United States Pckts Offline
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Kokilaraj Shanmugam
Tiger Tank Female Scent Marking / Kabini Nagarhole Tiger Reserve / View In Full Screen — at Kabini Backwaters.

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Nagarhole, Karanataka

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Nanjunda Datta
Atlast sighted an Tiger at Nagarhole forest.for few Seconds was just lucky to take only one snap.before she went in deep because of children shouting tiger loudly inthe safari ride — at

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Save the Tiger
January 14, 2013 ·
A four-year-old tiger was found dead in the Nagarhole tiger reserve in Karnataka.. The tiger succumbed to injuries in an apparent territorial fight.According to Conservator of Forests, Gokul, wildlife tourists discovered a tiger in a sitting posture in Kabini backwaters area on Sunday evening."Expect for bleeding from the nose, there are no visible injuries. As per the National Tiger Conservation Authority protocol we will conduct a postmortem tomorrow. Only then we will be able to ascertain what led to its death.


The hunt is on..

Nagarhole tiger reserve, Kabini. Karnataka.India.

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India parvez Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-21-2016, 07:20 PM by parvez )

@Pckts woo killer looks from the kabini male tiger. Amazing. Tfs
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Bangalore to Kabini: the perfect weekend getaway



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As a person living in Bangalore, you are never short of destinations that make for amazing weekend getaways. From beaches to hill stations and everything in between, the places around Bangalore cater to every traveller’s unique preferences. The best part about all these locations is the fact that they are well connected by roads and hence are perfect for going on a road trip.

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One such place is Kabini. It is a very popular travel destination for those who love the wilderness and enjoy getting lost in nature. Kabini lies in the Kodagu district of Karnataka and gets its name from the River Kabini which flows through this region. The Nagarhole National Park, which is tiger reserve and a part of the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, lies in close vicinity to the river as well.

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With options for going on a safari to catch a glimpse of wild animals like leopards, tigers and elephants, or just relaxing in the lush green surroundings by the river, Kabini is the perfect place to disconnect from the hustle and chaos of Bangalore to rejuvenate and revitalize your mind. Owing to its popularity, you’ll never be short of options when it comes to finding accommodation due to the multitude of 5 star resorts, lodges and homestays in the region.
How to get there:

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Kabini is situated at a distance of approximately 214 kms from Bangalore and the good conditions of the roads means that it is an ideal destination for a bike trip. The best route to reach Kabini from Bangalore is as follows: Bangalore – Ramnagara – Maddur – Mandya – Srirangapatna – Mysore – Antharasanthe – Kabini. The journey typically takes around 4-5 hours to complete depending on traffic and how fast you ride. NICE road, which connects Bangalore to the Bangalore-Mysore highway is a dream to ride on, and the final leg of the ride from Mysore to Kabini is astonishing as it offers you a peek into the stunning greenery that awaits you at Kabini.

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You should try to leave Bangalore around 5-6 am to ensure a fast journey as the highway tends to get congested later in the day. There are plenty of reputable restaurants and cafes like Kamath and Cafe Coffee Day where you can get some breakfast or relax and stretch your legs for a while. You will also find petrol pumps and ATMs at regular intervals along the journey.

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To summarise, Kabini is one of the most beautiful and relaxing weekend getaways from Bangalore. Travel here by bike, and the journey itself becomes almost as nice as the destination. If you don’t have a bike of your own or the right bike needed for this trip, then you can rent the bike of your choice from Wheelstreet at extremely affordable rates. Check out Wheelstreet for the most affordable and convenient bike rentals in Bangalore.

https://www.wheelstreet.in/blog/bangalor...d-getaway/
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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-07-2016, 04:13 PM by Ngala )

Photo and information credits: Gopu Photography
Tigress 
Nagarhole, Karnataka, India
March 2015

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Tiger and the Sunset | Dream Kabini
One of the frames of Euco close to my heart. This was when he was in his prime and no male Tiger dared to trespass his territory.
On this evening we saw him at his regular spot on the backwaters where he loved to spend his time in the summer heat under the shade of a culvert with permanent water. As the evening got cooler he decided it was time to move around his domain announcing his presence. He was moving so fast that it was difficult tracking him, but the fact that he was roaring continuously gave away his location. We had planned this shot for 3 years and this was the moment. One of the most satisfying images.


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Raja

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Bandipur Tiger Reserve, Bandipur,
May 2106, #Nikon #Windflower #Bandipur
Please view in Full screen

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Italy Ngala Offline
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Photo and information credits: Jayaprakash Bojan Photography
"Female Tigress on a misty morning, Nagarhole, 2016"

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India parvez Offline
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Tiger shot by Dr.Karanth,

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Italy Ngala Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-23-2016, 12:20 AM by Ngala )

Photo and information credits: Raju Mohan Kottakkal
"Bandipur Prince, 10/04/16"

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India parvez Offline
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Tiger from tamil nadu,

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Karanth tigers,

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Italy Ngala Offline
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Photo and information credits: Jayaprakash Bojan Photography
Nagarhole, 2016

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India shaileshsharadnaik Offline
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(05-12-2016, 05:01 AM)Pckts Wrote: Southern India is one of the lesser known tiger territories when it comes to individuals, but it is still one of the richest and diverse areas in all of India.
Please share any info on tigers, terrain or other species that inhabit this beautiful place.



*This image is copyright of its original author


The Indian government declared the forests of Sathyamangalam Wildlife Sanctuary a Tiger Reserve on March 15, 2013.

*This image is copyright of its original author


This boy needs no introduction, arguably one of the best known male tigers in all of India, not just the south.

Raja aka Prince

Praveen Premkumar Pai


Prince,The Raging Warrior of Bandipur Tiger Reserve, Bandipur. Yes he's Injured but still living his path marking his own territory of around 45km2.Still at the heights of ruling.He's been ruling the forest for about more than few years now facing & defeating other ferocious dominant males reaching out in his limits
Ageing doesn't mater when it comes to strength & responsibilities.He is the best example till date as an example to put in as great warrior who leads his own kingdom.
Every one visiting Bandipur tiger reserve would have this celebrity in their to do list and framing him is always fun &
satisfying.


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^His most recent image^
Sushvingowda's Wildlife Photography 

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^From this past april^



Next is this young fellow who seems to be all lined up as the new ruler

Basavanakatte Male / Bandipur

Hulk & Handsome smile emoticon he is going to be the future King of Bandipur. He has taken over more then half of Prince territory & its gone-be sometime before he takes over full. Little camera shy, but definitely not on this occasion, as he stayed put in the waterhole after having a big meal (gaur) .


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Mastigudi Male or Backwater Male / Kabini / March 2015

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Tiger Tank Male / Jan - 2015 / Kabini


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#‎Kabini‬ Nagarhole. Tiger encounters tough Gaur 


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but it isn't just the tigers to look out for, S. India has a large population of Gaur, Sloth Bear, Sambhar, Leopard and much, much more...
Kabini Jackal

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Leopard

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Nagarhole

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Dhole

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Sloth Bear

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Monitor Lizard

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Sloth Bear again

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Leopard

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Sambar

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Gaur

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All PC credit to Sushvingowda Wildlife Photos


S.p.Jagdish Prasad


The Elephant Emperor !
Tusker.
Kabini 2015.


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Here is the infamous Gaur kill by Prince





Hello

whoever has done this map, has missed Tadoba tiger reserve on that,  So I don't consider this as true representation.
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India parvez Offline
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Impressive specimen from nilgiri,

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Italy Ngala Offline
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Photo and information credits: Shyam Sundar Nijgal from Chayagraphy Ventures
Female Tigress| Kabini | June 2016

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India parvez Offline
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Tiger from biligiri rangaswamy,

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