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Thylacosmilus atrox

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-30-2017, 08:06 PM by epaiva )

Thylacosmilus is an extinct genus of saber-toothed metatherian that inhabited South America from the Late Miocene to Piacenzian epochs.[1] Remains of this animal have been found primarily in Catamarca, Entre Ríos, and La Pampa Provinces in northern Argentina.
Thylacosmilus had large, saber-like canines. The roots of these canines grew throughout the animal's life, growing in an arc up the maxilla and above the orbits. Its cervical vertebrae were very strong and to some extent resembled the vertebrae of Machairodontinae.
Body mass estimates of Thylacosmilus suggest this animal weighed between 80 to 120 kilograms (180 to 260 lb), and one estimate suggesting up to 150 kg (330 lb), about the same size as a modern jaguar. This would make it one of the largest known carnivorous metatherians.
Skeleton and reconstructed life appearance of the marsupial sabertooth Thylacosmilus atrox the bones shown in blue are unknown and have been reconstructed on the basis of other borhyaenoid marsupials.
Shoulder height: 60 cm. Book Sabertooth (Mauricio Anton)


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-30-2017, 08:28 PM by epaiva )

Credits to @chasingmammoth @paleodude and @the_dinosaur_man


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-15-2018, 07:10 AM by epaiva )

Credit to @infojurassicworld


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United States Polar Offline
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One of my favorite marsupials in existence: looks like a cat, probably fast as a cat, more robust, but it is a marsupial carnivore.
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India brotherbear Offline
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Another extinct marsupial: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n...-TpNoSL02M 
 
How a Changing Climate May Have Killed Off the Marsupial Lion
The fearsome predator, related to koalas and wombats, ruled the wilds of Australia until the loss of its habitat helped drive it to extinction

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-n...r1jX3Xg.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
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 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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