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The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)

Netherlands peter Offline
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#1
( This post was last modified: 09-22-2017, 09:28 PM by Ngala )

Post information about the Sumatran tiger in this thread (thanks for the advice, Richard).
 

 
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Indonesia phatio Offline
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#2

Unlike in India, tigers in Sumatra are notoriously hard to spot, partly due to the dense rainforest environment that they live in,
and partly due to their more cautious personality. so the camera-trapping method is the only solution at this moment.
here's some short video from the Camera Traping method.

the first known footage of a  male Sumatran tiger roaring in the wild, December 2012.
credit to Sumatran Tiger Trust (PKHS)




 

 
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Indonesia phatio Offline
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#3

another adult male Sumatran tiger in the wild marking his territory
credit to Sumatran Tiger Trust (PKHS)



 

 
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Indonesia phatio Offline
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#4

now from captive specimen. Jai Jai (male) and Melati (female) fighting during their first introduction in London Zoo



 

 
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India sanjay Offline
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#5

They are Sumatran tiger ? unbelievable !. How massive they are. TFS for sharing Phantera

 
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Wanderfalke Offline
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#6

thanks a lot for the cam trap videos. the tiger from the zoos indeed look like having quite a massive build.
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Pckts Offline
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#7

Their heads look enormous!
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Indonesia phatio Offline
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#8

The story to photograph a wild sumatran tiger

We already know how difficult it is to capture a tiger in the wild on camera, especially the siberian and sumatran tiger.
I remember reading a story from the indonesian blog of how hard to capture a wild sumatran tigers on camera.
the only solution is by using the camera trap. ok, here i try to translate it for you guys.

at first, they (including the blog writer) wants to photograph wild elephant.
so they set up a tree house next to the 'natural road' where they believe wild elephants usually using it.
and they didn't disappoint. at day 1, a group of elephants crossing that road.
when the large herbivore near by, they need to keep silent. A group of angry or panic elephants means trouble. Big trouble.
Angry elephant will break tree branches and throw it into random directions.
the last thing you want is to get hit, especially when you are high up in a tree.
so they understand completely not to underestimate the force of 15-20 wild elephants below them.
here's the pictures they got.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Mission 1 accomplished. the next target is wild tiger.
they set up a camera trap with a goat in a cage as a live bait to attract the sumatran predator.
that night they didn't sleep. They were watching and waiting from the tree house.
but nothing happened until the sun finally peered just over the horizon.

at day 2,they decided to change the live bait with a dog.
When the night falls, from their tree house, they hear the dog barks constantly.
Right before midnight, they hear tiger's roar echo through the dark sumatran jungle.
when in the black of night you hear a wild tiger roar, It can send a chill right through you, said the blog writer.
it brings a majestic and mystical power that one couldn't describe. very different from the roar of a captive tiger in a zoo,
when a tiger is just a domestic cat with a very large body, he added.
and then the dog suddenly became quiet. right after that, they saw the blitz flashing 3 times followed by a deafening roar.
and then everything went quiet. nothing happened again. the rest is just an eerie and quiet night.

in the morning they found the dog sitting in the corner of the cage, still shaken by what happened.
it must be scary experience, but fortunately the dog still alive and unharmed.
The tiger probably is a big dominant male judging from his footprints with a diameter of over 20 cm.

and here he is...

*This image is copyright of its original author

remember when you see this scary face and those eyes, this is not a face of an ordinary captive tiger.
this is the face of a wild sumatran tiger trying to eat his prey in the jungle at night.
everytime i see this photo and i imagine being that poor dog in the cage, it's always gives me an eerie feeling.

 

 

 
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#9
( This post was last modified: 03-08-2015, 07:03 AM by peter )

Nice info and a great picture of a wild tiger. Many thanks, my friend.

A print with a diameter of 20 cm., according to Hoogerwerf (1970), is right at the top of the list. He saw a print of that width on hard beach sand only once and wrote a print with a diameter of 18 cm. usually corresponds with a pad width of 9-10 cm. This is similar to the pad width of a large Amur female. Male Java tigers, in this respect, might have compared to them, although I think they could have been a bit heavier. The photographs of males I saw indicate they were more robust. They most certainly had longer, wider and heavier skulls. Java tigers were not as small as many think.    

I've finished the tables on Indonesian tigers. I managed to distinguish between adolescents (2-3), young adults (4-6) and mature animals (7 years and over). The differences are remarkable. 
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India sanjay Offline
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#10

Got this video, This is awesome moment when Bukitbarisan Sumatran Tiger Rangers released A captive Sumatran tiger into the wild.



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Pckts Offline
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#11
( This post was last modified: 03-24-2015, 11:35 PM by Pckts )

Sumatran Tiger-
photo clicked by-Rennett Stowe


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Pckts Offline
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#12
( This post was last modified: 03-24-2015, 11:50 PM by Pckts )


*This image is copyright of its original author

Apparently there has been an ongoing study for the past couple of years on Disease Surveillance of Sumatran Tigers.
Scientist think that maybe Canine Distemper Virus could be to blame for the aggression towards man.
"Disease surveillance programme – Wildlife Vets International (WVI)This project kicked off with a workshop for Indonesian wildlife vets, representatives of the Indonesian Veterinary Medical Association and the Wildlife and Conservation Office (BKSDA), hosted by TSI and facilitated by WVI.From this inaugural meeting the Sumatran Tiger Health Forum was established. It facilitated an agreed framework and protocols for disease surveillance across the island and a network of wildlife vets and supporting organisations."

"In recent years it has been reported that conflict tigers are behaving uncharacteristically – apparently healthy animals losing their fear of people and straying into villages. These symptoms are worryingly consistent with infection with Canine Distemper Virus (CDV), which can be fatal in large cats.  Furthermore, such behaviour makes tigers far more vulnerable to poachers."

There are two studies already completed and the results are shown in Reports at the bottom of the page
http://www.21stcenturytiger.org/previous...an-tigers/

 
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Pckts Offline
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#13
( This post was last modified: 03-25-2015, 12:03 AM by Pckts )

I posted some info on what Greenpeace is doing in Sumatra on another thread, but Check out bad the Deforestation really is

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

These volunteers travel throughout Sumatra taking photos and bringing attention to how bad the destruction is compliments of Companies like Mattel, KFC and tons of others... Palm oil is the main reason

*This image is copyright of its original author

Protestors dressed as Orangatangs in front of a KFC

*This image is copyright of its original author

The boxes used there destroy forests

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Tiger caught in snare and bulldozed over during destruction of their forest

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


 

 
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Pckts Offline
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#14

Nice looking 148kg Sumatran tiger from a while back

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Israel Amnon242 Offline
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#15
( This post was last modified: 09-18-2015, 12:42 AM by Amnon242 )

Johann. Malayan tiger. I gave him here, because, there is no thread for malayan tigers and because he looks like sumatran.

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