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The Proboscidea of the Past

Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#76

" Platybelodon was a genus of large herbivorous mammals related to the elephant. It lived during the middle Miocene Epoch in Africa, Asia and the Caucasus."


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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#77

" Elephant Evolution ?

About 180 million years ago, mammals arose from a reptile-like lineage about the same time as true dinosaurs. About 80 Million years ago, the genetic linage of elephants split from primates. The tree shrew is considered our nearest common ancestor.
It is believed that 50-60 million years ago, Moeritheriums, approximately the size of current day pigs, were the roots from which the proboscideans evolved. Based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, it is generally agreed that the manatees, dugongs, and hyraxes are the closest living relatives of today’s elephants. This is incredible given the vast difference in sizes, external appearance and the fact that these animals occupy completely different habitats.
The order under which Elephants are classified is the Proboscidea. This means animals with trunks/proboscis.
Over the course of evolutionary history, it has been estimated that there have been about 352 species of Probscideans. The creatures of this order have inhabited every continent except Australia and Antarctica. All but two (the African and Asian elephants) have died out. "


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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#78

Credit to Robin German 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#79

(06-06-2020, 08:09 PM)epaiva Wrote: Credit to Robin German 

*This image is copyright of its original author


Palaeoxodon resembled a modern Asian elephant by outer appearance, but genetically they were closely related to the African elephant.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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" For a long time, palaeontologists thought that Palaeoloxodon antiquus from Europe had a rather slenderly built skull roof crest; whereas the Indian species Palaeoloxodon namadicus is characterised by an extremely robust skull crest that extends near to the base of the trunk from the top of the skull.

But some Palaeoloxodon skulls, found in Italy and Germany, with almost the same exaggerated skull crest as the Indian form, led a few scientists into suspecting these might all be single species.
“Just like modern elephants, Palaeoloxodon went through six sets of teeth in their lifetimes. This means we can tell the age of any individual with confidence by looking at its fossilised teeth,” said Dr. Hanwen Zhang, a paleontologist in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol and the Department of Earth Sciences at UK’s Natural History Museum.
“When we looked at a series of skulls from Italy, Germany and India, we found a consistent pattern: the skull crest developed from being very small, not protruding beyond the forehead in juveniles to being larger and more protruding in young adults, eventually becoming very stout in aged adults.”
http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/palaeoloxodon-evolution-08045.html
Art: @rjpalmerartist"


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