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The Jaguar in Iberá

Balam Offline
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Iberá Wetlands

The Iberá Wetlands are a mix of swamps, bogs, stagnant lakes, lagoons, natural slough, and courses of water in the center and center-north of the province of Corrientes, Argentina.

Iberá is one of the most important freshwater reservoirs in South America and the second-largest wetland in the world after Pantanal in Brazil. It is of pluvial origin, with a total area of 15,000–20,000 km2 (5,800–7,700 sq mi).

Since 1982, part of the wetland is included within a provincial protected area, the Iberá Provincial Reserve, which comprises about 13,000 km2 (5,000 sq mi), the largest of such areas in Argentina. There are ongoing plans to further up its protection status to national park.


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Evelyn Proimos


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José Lozada


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Jorge Talkowski


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Diego Kondratzky


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Paul Cottis


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Fabián Soldano

The Jaguar in Corrientes

The yaguareté, jaguar or tiger (Panthera onca) is the largest felid in America. Historically, it was distributed throughout central and northern Argentina, inhabiting jungles, mountains, grasslands and bathed up to the Negro River in Patagonia.

Unfortunately, during the last centuries this beautiful animal has seen its distribution reduced to a few places in the country. Jaguars were still seen in Corrientes in the middle of the last century and in the Iberá region there are still people who remember when they shared the territory with the great spotted cat. Today in Argentina there are only three separate populations of jaguars in the montane jungles of the Northwest, in some sector of the Gran Chaco and in the missionary jungle. All these populations face the serious danger of disappearing in the coming decades, which would imply the total extinction of one of the most beautiful and emblematic animals in Argentina.

Faced with this situation, the Iberá Natural Reserve in Corrientes stands out for bringing together what may be the best conditions in all of Latin America to restore a disappeared population of this species. This is due to the existence of a 1,300,000 ha protected area that is home to vast areas depopulated by people and livestock, and which also has abundant wild animals that can support a long-term population of jaguars.

Faced with this opportunity, we want to point out five main reasons that justify the return of the species to Corrientes and, more specifically, to the Iberá Natural Reserve:


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With an area of 1.3 million hectares, the Iberá Nature Reserve represents a unique opportunity to try to recover this great animal. After two decades of conservation work, this reserve is home to large populations of capybaras, caiman and deer that will need the regulatory role of a large predator to maintain their long-term health. A study by a CONICET researcher shows that within Iberá there would be an area of nearly 650,000 hectares where jaguars could live with abundant food and minimal contact with humans and their livestock. There are few places in all of America that have so much territory suitable for this species and where it can be.

By Proyecto Iberá

Reintroduction Process & Timeline

In 2015, the Jaguar Reintroduction Center began to operate on the island of San Alonso, in the heart of the Esteros del Iberá. Its objective is to produce jaguars —either born there or coming from the wild from other regions— with the right qualifications needed to be able to be released in Iberá with the goal of forming a healthy population of this species so that it can recover its role as the top predator in this ecosystem.

After evaluating the vast continuous area of habitat that could support about 100 jaguars and conducting social surveys that showed great support across the province for the reintroduction of the jaguar, the construction of the Jaguar Reintroduction Center was carried out in 2013.

In 2015, the first breeding female, Tobuna, arrived, followed by the first male, Nahuel, in 2016. During 2017, a male and two females —Chiqui, Tania and Isis— were donated or given by different institutions in Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil, and they were also incorporated into the project. These animals are not suitable to be released, but the hope is that they will have cubs that will be raised without human contact and who will learn to hunt for themselves so that they can be liberated into the wild of the esteros.


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A snapshot from a camera recording of Arami and Mbarete days before their first birthday.

In June 2018, Arami and Mbarate were born —they are the first jaguar cubs to be born in the Reintroduction Center and the first jaguars to be born in Corrientes after half a century of their absence in the province. It is expected that after a phase of adaptation to life in the wild, they will be released in the next years to live free in Iberá, with their movements and locations constantly monitored thanks to satellite radio collars.

Tania, the mother of the cubs, is the daughter of Tobuna and was brought into the breeding program after became apparent that her mother, Tobuna, was not getting pregnant despite several episodes in which she went into heat and copulated with males. Her advanced age of an estimated 17 years is the most likely reason for her inability to become pregnant. A significant fact about Tania is that she lacks a hind foot, which she lost in an accident as a cub. Despite this handicap, the young jaguar quickly learned to hunt for herself in the Jaguar Reintroduction Center and has demonstrated that she is an exceptional mother. The father of the cubs is Chiqui, who was born free and lived in the wild in Paraguay until his mother was killed by poachers at which point he was taken to the Antiguy Animal Refuge.


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Jaguar Juruna during her arrival in Corrientes.

In February of 2019, two female jaguars, Juruna and Mariua, arrived at the Jaguar Reintroduction Center. They were born in the wild in Brazil at the beginning of 2017 and then rescued after their mother was killed by hunters. They were taken to the Conservation Refuge ”NEX No Extinction” near Brasilia, where they lived with little contact with humans, until they were donated to the jaguar reintroduction project in Iberá.

After completing his reproductive role at the Jaguar Reintroduction Center, Chiqui, the father of the cubs, was returned to the Atinguy-Yacyretá Animal Refuge in Paraguay in January 2019.

In August 2018, “Jatobazinho” was found north of Corumbá, Brazil. After swimming across the Paraguay River, he sought refuge under an overturned boat near the Jatobazinho Rural School, which gave him his name. When they found him in the Brazilian region of Pantanal, “Jatobazinho” weighed around 35 kilograms, but the work of organizations and governments allowed his recovery.

“It is believed that it was a juvenile who was displaced by other jaguars, was malnourished and it was obvious that it had not eaten for a long time,” said Alicia Delgado, head of Feline Quarantine at CLT Argentina (Conservation Land Trust).

The recovery process began at the Wild Animal Rehabilitation Center (CRAS) in Campo Grande (Brazil), where it was determined that their best destination was reintroduction into the wild. After five months at CRAS, Jatobazinho was transferred to the Caimán Ecological Refuge, where the Onçafari organization continued his recovery, keeping him without human contact and feeding him food and live prey, to facilitate his reintegration into nature.

By Infocampo & Rewilding Argentina

Jatobazinho was released into Ibera in November 2019: 






In December 2020, a second little of cubs were born to Mariua and Jatobazinho:

The certainty of the birth of Karai and Porã, as they were baptized days later by popular vote, was for the moment the last positive news for the recovery of a species whose existence is seriously threatened in Argentina. Children of Mariua and Jatobazinho, two Brazilian specimens that have been in the CRY since last year, the newcomers expand the number of animals considered "liberable" that consolidate the idea of repopulating Iberá with jaguars (jaguars), 70 years after its extinction in the area.





In January 2021 a third litter of cubs from Juruna and Jatobazinho was born, marking the third litter od jaguars born in the area by the reintroduction project





In January 2021 another major milestone took place, Mariua and her cubs Karai and Porã have been released into the wild in the immense grasslands, wetlands and forests of this National Park. For the first time in the world, the jaguar has been reintroduced in a region where it had disappeared. The decision of the national and provincial governments, and the commitment of the proud people of Corrientes has made it possible.

The recovery of Argentine species and environments through Rewilding takes a fundamental step ahead which will show the way for the future of conservation in the country.

By Rewilding Argentina




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Balam Offline
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AFTER 70 YEARS OF EXTINCTION, JAGUARS ARE ROAMING FREE IN THE IBERÁ WETLANDS




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( This post was last modified: 01-21-2021, 12:02 AM by Dark Jaguar )

(01-20-2021, 11:45 PM)Balam Wrote:
AFTER 70 YEARS OF EXTINCTION, JAGUARS ARE ROAMING FREE IN THE IBERÁ WETLANDS





Thats amazing news, such a fastastic accomplishment of all the people involved on this long process plan of rewild and adaptation.

Seeing this at same time that I am excited I feel bad about the Pampas which have lost its Big cat but at least Pampas still got a variety of amazing small wild cats to fill the environment there.

Let's see how Karai, Porã and mother Mariua will adapt in Iberá. This trio will start a new era into that environment.
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@Dark Jaguar I'm very excited about this new development in jaguar reintroduction. I had a talk with one of the people in the project and asked them why they haven't been able to relocate more jaguars from the Pantanal into the area, and it seems like the legal permits to do so are hard to obtain. I badly want to see a breeding and healthy population of jaguars in Iberá and relocating wild jaguars always seemed like the faster way to do so, but being from a different country makes the whole process more difficult.

Here is where I think Leandro Silveira could be of great assistance, he's been breeding jaguars in captivity for the longest and according to him he has no intentions of releasing them into the wild. Personally, I've never seen the point in continuing to breed jaguars if there won't be any tangible conservational project tied to it, and that has been my biggest critique of him.

In theory he could transport some of the younger cubs that have been born recently to be rewilded into Iberá, and could use some of his senior jaguars to breed and produce even more cubs for the project, similar to how Tania was used.
I think Leandro has a great opportunity here to make a real impact on jaguar conservation.

I hope we eventually see a reintroduction of jaguars in the Pampas too, but unfortunately it wouldn't happen in Uruguay. The country has completely closed off to the possibility of bringing jaguars back since they claim to not have enough space to house them. Most likely these reintroduction in the biome could take place in Brazil and Argentina.
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@Balam

Glad you've spoken to them, Keep your contact with them and keep an eye on weights datas as well.


I also heard in Argentina they started a conservation project by Fundación Rewilding Argentina to study the Maned Wolves in Iberá using VHF and GPS technology and they have collared The first Maned Wolf ever in Argentina so massive congrats to all professionals involved and to the ones who gave support and I am gonna post about it.


About Leandro he is well aware about the Iberá rewild project and he appreciates their great job, he mentions it on one of his recent videos about why Coragem cerrado cub can't return back to nature and how expensive it is to introduce top predators into the wild and I agree with what you said regarding the breeding his adult jaguars to help.


The jaguars sanctuaries and semen collection as you know are reserved for the most vunerable biomes population wise in Brazil, Caatinga and the divided Atlantic Forest are on top priority in case they sucumb specially for Caatinga jaguars since if conservation isn't done and well applied the small numbers of wild Caatinga jaguars left in Northeast Brazil would be the first ones to disappear today and that'll be the moment the Reprocon's semen collection and all captive jaguars kept for this porpoise in Brazil take action. But I gotta say Caatinga jaguars wouldn't be pure bred anymore ( Caatinga houses a massive unique melanism genetic density in its jaguars) which is bad but with no opitions better have mixed wild jaguars than no jaguars at all haha, the best thing to do is to avoid extinction at all costs.


And I'll post more in the Jaguars of Brazil thread more often on these brazilian biomes as I get free time.


I can imagine how hard the bureaucracy is for permissions to legally allow translocations of native wild animals between 2 countries or more.


It would be good act of Leandro and IOP if they donated a few brazilian jaguars (in conditions to be worked for rewild) for Iberá, they would play big role just like Jatobarzinho young male.


NEX No Extinction donated 2 female jaguars (Juruna and Mariua) to Iberá. They were rescued from the wild after their mother died at the hands of hunters. In the NEX Center near Brasília they remained with minimal contact with humans until they were donated to the Jaguar Reintroduction Project in Iberá.


Back to Leandro outside of jaguars in his sanctuary in Goiás State he and his Institute IOP also keep 200 Black Caimans juveniles approved by the Goiás State Environmental Secretariat (SEMAD) the State environmental authority which is quite controversial as the Crocodilians are conducted in an area outside the species distribution, the IOP staff announced the implementation of an ex-situ conservation breeding program for Black Caimans (M. niger) as a potential genetic reservoir for an endangered species and the Crocodilian experts community of Brazil isn't liking this idea since his sanctuary doesn't have enough structure to house such a formidable Top predator as Black Caimans and there's risks of them escaping from the sanctuary with unpredictable ecological consequences in environments where Black Caimans has never occurred.


The Black caiman’s escaping dispersal in the Cerrado or Pantanal would be tragic to the ecossystem as the Black Caimans would impact the local predators of the Biomes and such a top predator that can reach and surpass 6 meters in length could lead the risk of potentially creating conficts with local communities.


Thats what is worring the Brazilian Crocodilian-Research community including the brazilian Black Caiman expert Ronis da Silveira about the safety of the enclosures used by IOP to avoid the escape of M. niger individuals larger than 1.5 m to avoid unnecessary ecological damage and also Neither IOP nor SEMAD has contacted any crocodilian specialist in Brazil to assess the current state of the animals and define criteria for making decisions about their future.


So Leandro, his wife and (SEMAD) holds a huge responsability on their hands, Lets just Hope and prey no accidents of Black Caimans escaping happen in their sanctuary.





This is the Official link complaint about the juveniles Black Caimans case in IOP that was recently published by Brazilian Crocodilians Specialists.

You must Check it Out.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._community
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Balam Offline
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(01-21-2021, 09:36 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: @Balam

Glad you've spoken to them, Keep your contact with them and keep an eye on weights datas as well.


I also heard in Argentina they started a conservation project by Fundación Rewilding Argentina to study the Maned Wolves in Iberá using VHF and GPS technology and they have collared The first Maned Wolf ever in Argentina so massive congrats to all professionals involved and to the ones who gave support and I am gonna post about it.


About Leandro he is well aware about the Iberá rewild project and he appreciates their great job, he mentions it on one of his recent videos about why Coragem cerrado cub can't return back to nature and how expensive it is to introduce top predators into the wild and I agree with what you said regarding the breeding his adult jaguars to help.


The jaguars sanctuaries and semen collection as you know are reserved for the most vunerable biomes population wise in Brazil, Caatinga and the divided Atlantic Forest are on top priority in case they sucumb specially for Caatinga jaguars since if conservation isn't done and well applied the small numbers of wild Caatinga jaguars left in Northeast Brazil would be the first ones to disappear today and that'll be the moment the Reprocon's semen collection and all captive jaguars kept for this porpoise in Brazil take action. But I gotta say Caatinga jaguars wouldn't be pure bred anymore ( Caatinga houses a massive unique melanism genetic density in its jaguars) which is bad but with no opitions better have mixed wild jaguars than no jaguars at all haha, the best thing to do is to avoid extinction at all costs.


And I'll post more in the Jaguars of Brazil thread more often on these brazilian biomes as I get free time.


I can imagine how hard the bureaucracy is for permissions to legally allow translocations of native wild animals between 2 countries or more.


It would be good act of Leandro and IOP if they donated a few brazilian jaguars (in conditions to be worked for rewild) for Iberá, they would play big role just like Jatobarzinho young male.


NEX No Extinction donated 2 female jaguars (Juruna and Mariua) to Iberá. They were rescued from the wild after their mother died at the hands of hunters. In the NEX Center near Brasília they remained with minimal contact with humans until they were donated to the Jaguar Reintroduction Project in Iberá.


Back to Leandro outside of jaguars in his sanctuary in Goiás State he and his Institute IOP also keep 200 Black Caimans juveniles approved by the Goiás State Environmental Secretariat (SEMAD) the State environmental authority which is quite controversial as the Crocodilians are conducted in an area outside the species distribution, the IOP staff announced the implementation of an ex-situ conservation breeding program for Black Caimans (M. niger) as a potential genetic reservoir for an endangered species and the Crocodilian experts community of Brazil isn't liking this idea since his sanctuary doesn't have enough structure to house such a formidable Top predator as Black Caimans and there's risks of them escaping from the sanctuary with unpredictable ecological consequences in environments where Black Caimans has never occurred.


The Black caiman’s escaping dispersal in the Cerrado or Pantanal would be tragic to the ecossystem as the Black Caimans would impact the local predators of the Biomes and such a top predator that can reach and surpass 6 meters in length could lead the risk of potentially creating conficts with local communities.


Thats what is worring the Brazilian Crocodilian-Research community including the brazilian Black Caiman expert Ronis da Silveira about the safety of the enclosures used by IOP to avoid the escape of M. niger individuals larger than 1.5 m to avoid unnecessary ecological damage and also Neither IOP nor SEMAD has contacted any crocodilian specialist in Brazil to assess the current state of the animals and define criteria for making decisions about their future.


So Leandro, his wife and (SEMAD) holds a huge responsability on their hands, Lets just Hope and prey no accidents of Black Caimans escaping happen in their sanctuary.





This is the Official link complaint about the juveniles Black Caimans case in IOP that was recently published by Brazilian Crocodilians Specialists.

You must Check it Out.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._community

To be honest, out of this whole situation to me the organization that keeps shining and showing their impeccable work is Oncafari, I mentioned in the opening post of this thread how crucial they were in the rescue of Jotabazinho and the two sisters for further rewilding in Ibera. Oncafari was the first organization to release orphaned jaguars back into the wild, where IOP failed, and their first-hand knowledge is what is allowing this reintroduction project in Ibera to take place.

The biologist for Oncafari are setting themselves apart as world renounced for big cat conservation, I'm very proud of them, and yet they're very open to the public and in helping all of us who are interested in jaguar ecology by providing information. They have been nothing but kind to me as they provide me data, whereas IOP refuses to release data to the public. 

It seems to me that the team at IOP is involved in a series of controversial projects such as the one you mentioned involving the black caiman on a foreign habitat. Moreover, I still find it uneasy that he's breeding jaguars to keep them in captivity and subjecting them to stress at a young age, depriving them of proper contact with other jaguars, and this was the impression I got from the jaguar Coragem. The video where he explained why he thought he could not be released into the wild did not seat well with me. Coragem appeared extremely agitated, I can't think for a youngster like him the isolation it is would do any good. Why not just bring it to Ibera to continue helping jaguar conservation in a practical way? The permits needed for a jaguar that was born in captivity are different and I assume the relocation process would be easier to get done.

Overall, I can say that I'm not a big fan of the work of Leandro, he's done some really good things for jaguar conservation throughout his career, but other decisions he's made I can't help but disagree on.
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( This post was last modified: 01-22-2021, 01:57 AM by Dark Jaguar )

(01-21-2021, 09:53 PM)Balam Wrote:
(01-21-2021, 09:36 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: @Balam

Glad you've spoken to them, Keep your contact with them and keep an eye on weights datas as well.


I also heard in Argentina they started a conservation project by Fundación Rewilding Argentina to study the Maned Wolves in Iberá using VHF and GPS technology and they have collared The first Maned Wolf ever in Argentina so massive congrats to all professionals involved and to the ones who gave support and I am gonna post about it.


About Leandro he is well aware about the Iberá rewild project and he appreciates their great job, he mentions it on one of his recent videos about why Coragem cerrado cub can't return back to nature and how expensive it is to introduce top predators into the wild and I agree with what you said regarding the breeding his adult jaguars to help.


The jaguars sanctuaries and semen collection as you know are reserved for the most vunerable biomes population wise in Brazil, Caatinga and the divided Atlantic Forest are on top priority in case they sucumb specially for Caatinga jaguars since if conservation isn't done and well applied the small numbers of wild Caatinga jaguars left in Northeast Brazil would be the first ones to disappear today and that'll be the moment the Reprocon's semen collection and all captive jaguars kept for this porpoise in Brazil take action. But I gotta say Caatinga jaguars wouldn't be pure bred anymore ( Caatinga houses a massive unique melanism genetic density in its jaguars) which is bad but with no opitions better have mixed wild jaguars than no jaguars at all haha, the best thing to do is to avoid extinction at all costs.


And I'll post more in the Jaguars of Brazil thread more often on these brazilian biomes as I get free time.


I can imagine how hard the bureaucracy is for permissions to legally allow translocations of native wild animals between 2 countries or more.


It would be good act of Leandro and IOP if they donated a few brazilian jaguars (in conditions to be worked for rewild) for Iberá, they would play big role just like Jatobarzinho young male.


NEX No Extinction donated 2 female jaguars (Juruna and Mariua) to Iberá. They were rescued from the wild after their mother died at the hands of hunters. In the NEX Center near Brasília they remained with minimal contact with humans until they were donated to the Jaguar Reintroduction Project in Iberá.


Back to Leandro outside of jaguars in his sanctuary in Goiás State he and his Institute IOP also keep 200 Black Caimans juveniles approved by the Goiás State Environmental Secretariat (SEMAD) the State environmental authority which is quite controversial as the Crocodilians are conducted in an area outside the species distribution, the IOP staff announced the implementation of an ex-situ conservation breeding program for Black Caimans (M. niger) as a potential genetic reservoir for an endangered species and the Crocodilian experts community of Brazil isn't liking this idea since his sanctuary doesn't have enough structure to house such a formidable Top predator as Black Caimans and there's risks of them escaping from the sanctuary with unpredictable ecological consequences in environments where Black Caimans has never occurred.


The Black caiman’s escaping dispersal in the Cerrado or Pantanal would be tragic to the ecossystem as the Black Caimans would impact the local predators of the Biomes and such a top predator that can reach and surpass 6 meters in length could lead the risk of potentially creating conficts with local communities.


Thats what is worring the Brazilian Crocodilian-Research community including the brazilian Black Caiman expert Ronis da Silveira about the safety of the enclosures used by IOP to avoid the escape of M. niger individuals larger than 1.5 m to avoid unnecessary ecological damage and also Neither IOP nor SEMAD has contacted any crocodilian specialist in Brazil to assess the current state of the animals and define criteria for making decisions about their future.


So Leandro, his wife and (SEMAD) holds a huge responsability on their hands, Lets just Hope and prey no accidents of Black Caimans escaping happen in their sanctuary.





This is the Official link complaint about the juveniles Black Caimans case in IOP that was recently published by Brazilian Crocodilians Specialists.

You must Check it Out.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._community

To be honest, out of this whole situation to me the organization that keeps shining and showing their impeccable work is Oncafari, I mentioned in the opening post of this thread how crucial they were in the rescue of Jotabazinho and the two sisters for further rewilding in Ibera. Oncafari was the first organization to release orphaned jaguars back into the wild, where IOP failed, and their first-hand knowledge is what is allowing this reintroduction project in Ibera to take place.

The biologist for Oncafari are setting themselves apart as world renounced for big cat conservation, I'm very proud of them, and yet they're very open to the public and in helping all of us who are interested in jaguar ecology by providing information. They have been nothing but kind to me as they provide me data, whereas IOP refuses to release data to the public. 

It seems to me that the team at IOP is involved in a series of controversial projects such as the one you mentioned involving the black caiman on a foreign habitat. Moreover, I still find it uneasy that he's breeding jaguars to keep them in captivity and subjecting them to stress at a young age, depriving them of proper contact with other jaguars, and this was the impression I got from the jaguar Coragem. The video where he explained why he thought he could not be released into the wild did not seat well with me. Coragem appeared extremely agitated, I can't think for a youngster like him the isolation it is would do any good. Why not just bring it to Ibera to continue helping jaguar conservation in a practical way? The permits needed for a jaguar that was born in captivity are different and I assume the relocation process would be easier to get done.

Overall, I can say that I'm not a big fan of the work of Leandro, he's done some really good things for jaguar conservation throughout his career, but other decisions he's made I can't help but disagree on.


Onçafari indeed did a very good job on their rewild project with Isa and Fera in pantanal and Pandora and Vivara in Amazon and hopefully they will succeed in introducing the female Puma Cacau ( which I am pretty sure you aware of ) into the Pantanal.

But infos wise there's still the Cerrado jaguar Lua they captured but Onçafari didn't reveal the weight and I'm still waiting that info and yes the researches and conservation of Maned Wolves is their main priority in Pousada Trijunção east Cerrado but as they decided to capture one cerrado jaguar (like Lua) the datas shall be post to the public as well also considering if they capture just a few more cerrado jaguars from that area. So Lua's weight is still a mystery for us.


About Leandro, his wife and the IOP crew the first thing I gotta say is that I am fed up with making hundreds of questions unanswered, so I am not asking about weights anymore.

About Coragem she is a female though, I don't think she's gonna be sent to Iberá specially cause she got a Godmother (a famous female artist) and Leandro will breed her to keep the pure Cerrado jaguar genetics in case Cerrado jaguars faces extinction or severe diminish in population, he also mentioned he only breeds jaguars from the same biome to keep their original genes from each biome.

His breeding idea overall from what I understood is to keep a reserve of genetically healthy jaguars in captivity for the future in case a biome loses its big cat.

Coragem interacts with other jaguars cubs and they relief and calm her down in the moment, she acts aggressively only towards humans when approached as she was found in the wild on a certain age already bonded with her mother with no interaction/contact with humans at all, so she will never be ''docile'' like her captive friends and that's how Leandro said she gotta be, to keep her with her natural wild jaguar spirit.

overall I agree with you, Leandro has done nice job for conservation and publishing datas ( scientific published ) but at same time these controversial cases cannot pass in blank, when I watched for the first time a video of the juvenile Black Caimans about a year ago I was like ''why the hell are there Black Caimans there, if it was other caiman species I'd be more relax but those were freaking Black Caimans as they get massive and are extremely aggressive and tend to be man-eaters and as I know very well how they look even as cubs/calves I noticed it before he even mentioned they were M.niger''


I don't agree with the Black Caimans there outside its natural range but now Lets hope his Black Caiman plan works since its already been started and approved by SEMAD who also gotta take reponsability for this. I hope those juveniles Black Caimans sucessfuly get released in Amazon biome territory where they belong. Only time will tell.

Here's how the juveniles Black Caimans are managed by IOP as Richard Rasmussen visited the sanctuary once again.






I think Leandro did better in the 2000's when he was working on the field capturing jaguars in Pantanal, Amazon, Caatinga as his Institute even studied Caatinga jaguars in Parque Nacional Serra das Capivaras and Parque Nacional Serra das Confusões both in Piauí. but after the sanctuary creation its more like internet and social media as I personally feel nowadays he shares for his followers more content from his sanctuary specially than the wilderness of Cerrado and I personally don't like this as its been a long time he doesn't post a camera trap video of some cerrado jaguar, maned wolf or other cerrado animal, but he is still posting the collar datas of where they have been during the months but as an enthusiast thats not enough for me ( but it is for his public ), in my case I wanna know way more about the wild. also its breeding time there and Maya, Pantera, Pandora are in heat so wild male jaguars are visiting the sanctuary more often ( and to also fight with Xavante ) so he should install a camera outside the enclosures to know who are the  cerrado jaguars that are going there, he only tracks them by the pugmarks and tracks such as the imposing hind legs digs marks that males sometimes leave on the ground when they're willing to fight, I am not sure about his followers but I pesonally wanna see more details on this regard about the wild Cerrado and learn way more about it, if he shared as many wild content as he does of the sanctuary I would be good with it but above all this I really want the weights of the jaguars he captures from that biome.

I think datas has to be published not kept (specially sizes haha) and this goes not only for IOP but also to all projects who works with wild animals.
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Update on the Monitoring of the Iberá jaguars Mariua, Karai and Porã recently released.




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#9

Mariua and her cubs in the wilderness of Ibera, historic photo:


*This image is copyright of its original author


By Rewilding Argentina
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Balam Offline
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THE JAGUAR, A KEYSTONE SPECIES OF IBERÁ'S ECOSYSTEM.

Generally, top predators are keystone species and play notable ecological roles in the ecosystems they inhabit. Without them, natural habitats deteriorate and become poor. Jaguars, for instance, regulate the environment by modifying their prey abundance and behavior.

As with the grey wolf in Yellowstone, we expect that the jaguar's comeback triggers notable changes in Iberá. These changes will help reverse environmental crises such as biodiversity loss, climate chaos, and the appearance of new pandemics.

To weigh these changes in the ecosystem, we are working with researchers from “Proyecto Yaguareté (Jaguar Project)” within the National Scientific and Technical Research Council and the CelBA Civic Association, both organizations leading the investigations.

The investigation includes placing cameras in the field to record the presence and attributes of other species of Iberá. Last week, these cameras captured the park's new inhabitants, Mariua and her cubs Karai and Porã. Although they're still inconspicuous, changes in the environment start to develop.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Photo credits: Proyecto Yaguareté

By Rewilding Argentina
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Balam Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-16-2021, 02:48 AM by Balam )

ANCHORING JAGUARS IN IBERÁ PARK.

One significant challenge of reintroducing jaguars in Iberá, in northeastern Argentina, is that they stay within the park.

Mariua, the first released jaguar, lived in big pens for two years, which allowed for familiarization with this new habitat. Now in freedom, her territory is stable and relatively small, thanks to the abundance of prey. Moreover, the presence of other jaguars in the nearby Reintroduction Center contributes to keeping a narrow range.

Mariua's cubs, Karai and Porã, are old enough to follow her, although for short distances. Slowly and without stress, Mariua explores these wild wetlands, the home where she is now free.

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( This post was last modified: 04-17-2021, 11:23 PM by Balam )

Second release of jaguars!

JURUNA AND HER CUBS, SÃSO AND SAGUA'A, ROAM FREE IN IBERÁ PARK.⠀⠀⠀
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This week, the project to return the jaguar to Corrientes, where it disappeared from 70 years ago for human actions, took a significant step forward when a wild jaguar, Juruna, and her two cubs, Sãso and Sagua'a, left the 30-hectare enclosure to live completely free in the Iberá wetlands.⠀⠀⠀
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This project marks the first time in history that humans are working to return the jaguar to an area where it went extinct.⠀⠀⠀
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Rewilding allows us to generate fully functional and complete ecosystems, face the wildlife and climate crises, and prevent the appearance of new pandemics. Furthermore, Rewilding helps us develop local economies that create genuine jobs and secure the wellbeing of communities while also restoring the nature values we've lost.⠀⠀⠀
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Rewilding invites us to rethink how we relate to the natural world and to all living critters that share our home planet with us.

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Balam Offline
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REWILDING, OR THE RETURN OF ECOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS


The rewilding process seeks to return species to their natural environments in abundant quantities to fulfill their ecological roles. Ultimately, rewilding aims at restoring the ecological interactions among species, thus making ecosystems healthy and functional again.

Predation is one of these interactions. Jaguars and marsh deer used to share their countries over millions of hectares in Argentina until around 100 years ago when human actions reduced their populations rampantly.

But in Iberá, in northeastern Argentina, marsh deer populations have recovered notably, and the jaguar has been reintroduced; in other words, both species are interacting again. In this video, the jaguar Juruna and her cubs feed for days on the remains of a marsh deer that Juruna took down. Thus, predator and prey fulfill their ecological roles once again.

Most likely, this scene does not occur anywhere else in Argentina. Nevertheless, we are working to return them to other ecosystems as well. Slowly but firmly, Iberá becomes more functional, vibrant, and complete.

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